# of Hours of study & prep - Page 4 - Anything about the PE Exam - Engineer Boards
Jump to content
Engineer Boards
Sign in to follow this  
cdcengineer

# of Hours of study & prep

Recommended Posts

Passed. First try. Civil:WRE

I studied about 50-60 hours total. I used reference materials, practice problems and practice exams. No prep classes.

I started strong in mid-January by using the CERM and working through the morning topics. I got through Construction, Geotech, and the Materials topics before I got swamped by work in mid-February. I didn't really have a chance to study again until close to the end of March. I was very panicked and was convinced I was screwed. I ended up taking the week off work leading up to the exam. Best decision ever. I spent that weekend quickly going through all the remaining morning topics. Monday I took off and just relaxed. Tuesday I took a practice exam. I worked through it untimed with my reference materials, but not looking at the solutions until I was completely done. I used this time to tab my references as I went. Wednesday and Thursday I took two more practice exams. I timed these just like the real exam. One hour lunch break and all.

I think doing the timed exams and getting a feel for the speed with which I needed to work was crucial to exam day. It also got me comfortable with using the references. The other big piece of advice that I can give is to split the exam questions into three groups. Questions you read and you absolutely know you can solve, questions that seem solvable with a little search through your reference materials, and finally questions you must make a sacrifice to the engineering gods to be able to solve. Work through those three groups in that order on exam day and you will be better off for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 Times

First 3 times were in Transportation PE Civil. 

Last time was in WRE.

1st time - Winged it to see what was on the test. Total 25 hours.

2nd time - Wasn't prepared cause my house flooded. Total 50 hours.

3rd time - Thought I really passed. Took Testmaster and all. 125 hours.

4th time - Tired of the game and went full head on ballistic style. 450 hours. I've solved over 600 problems. I came to the test with 7 binders of my problems, and 3 reference book (CERM, a civil engineering dictionary and Eddy and Metcalf Book) Passed April 2019.

 

 

Edited by Fisherman504
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Took civil - water resources. I didn’t take a class, just studied on my own. I started studying mid February, every hour on my lunch break I would work some problems and would study about 2 hours in Saturdays and Sundays. By March I was up to 4-6 hours every Saturday and Sunday. Two weeks before the exam I took a Friday off work and set up a mock test. Then spent Saturday and Sunday going over what I missed the weekend before the exam I took another mock practice exam, then Monday and Tuesday before the exam studied both nights, then took Wednesday and Thursday off from studying. I think in all I was around 100 to 150 hours? 

I used NCEES practice exam and Goswhami practice exam I got off Amazon. I had all of the 6 minute solution books from a coworker and the CERM. Just worked a ton of problems. Passed on my first try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Passed Civil:WRE first time with probably ~100 hours.

I took the on-demand EET course for both breadth and depth. I watched the lectures after work and weekends starting in early January, took a four week break in February for a trip, and continued prepping up until the exam. I hardly did any practice problems until I did a couple practice exams the week prior to the exam. I was incredibly nervous until that point, as I studied Environmental Engineering in undergrad and didn't have a lot of the background for about 60% of the breadth section but very confident in water related topics. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

~150 - 200 hours. Took Dr. Tom's Classroom since my degree is in Chemical and I was taking Mechanical TFS. A lot of similarities shared between the disciplines but there were things I thought Dr. Tom's Classroom helped me prepare for.

Pass on first attempt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Took WRE:

Didn't get seriously into studying until the end of January. 

Started light on the hours to not overwhelm myself at first.

In February probably studied 5-7 hours during the week and 8-10 hours on S&S. Focusing more on the AM.

In March probably studied 7-10 hours during the week and 12-16 hours on S&S. Main focus was PM.

I think in April it was 8 hours a day on the 1st-4th lol. 

Bought a ton of practice tests. Did them multiple times, switching them up so I wouldn't get the correct answer due to memory. Definitely helped me seeing a wide range of questions that could be asked on both AM/PM. 

A week before the exam I bought 3 more AM tests and 2 more PM tests. I'm confident without buying those books and working them out, I may not of passed. 

Read the CERM on topics I knew I needed more help than others. The rest was skimming and highlighting sections that I thought could be relevant. 

 

Took PPI, and while the teacher was helpful in Q&A sessions, I had a hunch that it was a waste of time to watch the entire session. And in hindsight it was. 

Passed on the first try. 

Edited by john813

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Fisherman504 said:

4 Times

First 3 times were in Transportation PE Civil. 

Last time was in WRE.

1st time - Winged it to see what was on the test. Total 25 hours.

2nd time - Wasn't prepared cause my house flooded. Total 50 hours.

3rd time - Thought I really passed. Took Testmaster and all. 125 hours.

4th time - Tired of the game and went full head on ballistic style. 450 hours. I've solved over 600 problems. I came to the test with 7 binders of my problems, and 3 reference book (CERM, a civil engineering dictionary and Eddy and Metcalf Book) Passed April 2019.

 

 

Congratulations! You must be elated.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About 190 hours of study. However I did a lot of problems and took  the NCEES, GOSWAMI, and Civil PE practice tests. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/14/2019 at 10:21 AM, eNgINeEr_93 said:

I feel like this is kind of a silly question, because it varies per person. In my opinion, study your ass off. Study as many hours as it takes to feel confident about all of the subjects. I took EET and would highly recommend it. They get you on the right path and give you the tools necessary to study the right material, as well as hundreds of practice problems and quizzes. Im not sure how many hours i studied, but I can one thing, say coming out of the exam feeling confident was worth every minute I set at the dining room table with my head in the books.

I 100% agree!! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/10/2010 at 2:48 PM, bta15 said:

I studied for approximately 16 hours. 2 hours each weekend for a month prior to the test, then 8 hours the day before the test, no review course. I took the Civil Transportation exam and passed the first try.

 

6 minute solution FTW.

 

On 5/10/2010 at 2:48 PM, bta15 said:

I studied for approximately 16 hours. 2 hours each weekend for a month prior to the test, then 8 hours the day before the test, no review course. I took the Civil Transportation exam and passed the first try.

 

6 minute solution FTW.

Edited by engineerme1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hahaha I remember this was one of the first threads I ever read on EB...back when I was googling, "Is 60 hrs enough to pass PE exam?" (SPOILER ALERT - not for me!!!)

It differs for everyone, but I finally passed the October 2018 exam after putting in a solid 200 hrs of study.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/15/2019 at 12:07 PM, john813 said:

Took WRE:

Didn't get seriously into studying until the end of January. 

Started light on the hours to not overwhelm myself at first.

In February probably studied 5-7 hours during the week and 8-10 hours on S&S. Focusing more on the AM.

In March probably studied 7-10 hours during the week and 12-16 hours on S&S. Main focus was PM.

I think in April it was 8 hours a day on the 1st-4th lol. 

Bought a ton of practice tests. Did them multiple times, switching them up so I wouldn't get the correct answer due to memory. Definitely helped me seeing a wide range of questions that could be asked on both AM/PM. 

A week before the exam I bought 3 more AM tests and 2 more PM tests. I'm confident without buying those books and working them out, I may not of passed. 

Read the CERM on topics I knew I needed more help than others. The rest was skimming and highlighting sections that I thought could be relevant. 

 

Took PPI, and while the teacher was helpful in Q&A sessions, I had a hunch that it was a waste of time to watch the entire session. And in hindsight it was. 

Passed on the first try. 

Which exams did you purchase for your simulated exams?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

250 hours.  500-600 problems.  

Engineering Pro Guides as primary guiding document.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mine was around 190 hours but only for 7 weeks. I started late in mid-February.

not to steal any thunder but I have summarized my whole study journey here: 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

200-ish hours? Took and passed Civil PE Transportation on the first try. I started studying in late December in order to spread out the overall burden, since I already knew there were several weeks when I wouldn't be able to study at all.

I wanted to put everything I had into passing, so I went with EET AM / PM and took every listed reference to the test except Pedestrian Facilities (someone had 'walked off' with it ...). I thought EET prepared me very well for the test, but I also picked it because of the excellent reference binders that came with the course.

Unlike others on the board, I took exactly zero practice tests. All of my time was spent on reviewing concepts, navigating references, and working a few practice problems using reference tables and other resources. I spent a few hours tabbing things to quickly get my bearings in the actual test, but only marked significant chapters or indices rather than specific concepts. My situation is unique, since I have a lot of experience in research, reading, and looking up code trivia.

When you think about it, I believe something like 50-60% of the PE is conceptual questions rather than calculations?

I was already very confident in my ability to quickly solve problems, so I worked mostly on understanding the fastest route to solutions, practicing a few key or confusing concepts, and recognizing/categorizing problems in terms of what reference they were likely to use.

My first pass in each section was solely writing notes about what equation/concept/reference each problem was citing. A few I knew from memory, so I marked those (about five in the AM and five in the PM), then did the next easiest (i.e., simple lookups) another five in the AM and five in the PM, and then did the ones I needed to solve (10 AM and 10 PM), which got me up to roughly 40 correct overall. The remainder were more challenging code trivia with exotic locations and calculations with "traps" (another 10 in the AM and PM). This got me to about 60/80. The last 10 remaining to solve in the AM and PM I felt were more "reaching" or guessing questions, or those with so many steps that they were inefficient to attempt to solve with 100% certainty. I attempted to solve these with at least educated guesses or by eliminating between 1-2 answers.

After the test, I felt no worse than I had during the FE, which I also passed on the first try.

From what I've seen, focusing on understanding easy questions and getting as many of those right as possible is a key to substantially improving scores without unwarranted effort.

EET helped a lot in this case by teaching and reviewing the fundamentals of each section, with an emphasis on problems that were almost certain to appear on the test. Their classes certainly helped me be very efficient in my studying!

Edited by Sirian
details on weeks studying
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/17/2019 at 3:01 PM, aspiringWRE_PE said:

Which exams did you purchase for your simulated exams?

 

I know I have a few more not listed but looking at my Amazon orders:

Pe Prepared (All AM and PM tests offered for WRE) 

Gruttadauria ref manual/ practice exam

Civil Engineering PE Practice Exams: By Civil PE Practice (AM only) 

Goswami exam books. 3 in total I believe. 

Older NCEES Exam prep books. 2004 and I think 2010(2004 only had 20 questions for AM IIRC) 

2014 NCEES practice exam 

 

 

Edited by john813
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/15/2019 at 1:07 PM, john813 said:

Took WRE:

Didn't get seriously into studying until the end of January. 

Started light on the hours to not overwhelm myself at first.

In February probably studied 5-7 hours during the week and 8-10 hours on S&S. Focusing more on the AM.

In March probably studied 7-10 hours during the week and 12-16 hours on S&S. Main focus was PM.

I think in April it was 8 hours a day on the 1st-4th lol. 

Bought a ton of practice tests. Did them multiple times, switching them up so I wouldn't get the correct answer due to memory. Definitely helped me seeing a wide range of questions that could be asked on both AM/PM. 

A week before the exam I bought 3 more AM tests and 2 more PM tests. I'm confident without buying those books and working them out, I may not of passed. 

Read the CERM on topics I knew I needed more help than others. The rest was skimming and highlighting sections that I thought could be relevant. 

 

Took PPI, and while the teacher was helpful in Q&A sessions, I had a hunch that it was a waste of time to watch the entire session. And in hindsight it was. 

Passed on the first try. 

Where did you purchase the practice test? I did the NCEES and six min solutions but I feel they didn't really help. Failed WRE April 19

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/17/2019 at 3:01 PM, aspiringWRE_PE said:

Which exams did you purchase for your simulated exams?

I am trying to figure out what practice test helped the folks out there the most. I did school of PE but not enough practice test I guess. I am WRE as well 😞 maybe October will be our time

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/14/2019 at 3:03 PM, Fisherman504 said:

4 Times

First 3 times were in Transportation PE Civil. 

Last time was in WRE.

1st time - Winged it to see what was on the test. Total 25 hours.

2nd time - Wasn't prepared cause my house flooded. Total 50 hours.

3rd time - Thought I really passed. Took Testmaster and all. 125 hours.

4th time - Tired of the game and went full head on ballistic style. 450 hours. I've solved over 600 problems. I came to the test with 7 binders of my problems, and 3 reference book (CERM, a civil engineering dictionary and Eddy and Metcalf Book) Passed April 2019.

 

 

What problems did you use to study? practice test online?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, CharlieHotel47_CE_WER said:

What problems did you use to study? practice test online?

I've used the following to study. I also took Testmasters 2018 classroom based course so I used all of their problems. What I did was I rewrote the problems and solve them twice. First time I would put little notes in different color ink telling me to convert or to go to certain equations. 

1. NCEES Practice Exam 1999, 2000, 2011, 2013.

2. Six minute solutions from PPI

3. Handbook of Civil Engineering Calculations by Tyler G. Hicks.

4. CERM 15th edition

I didn't bother taking the first three to the test. If I didn't pull it from the books while studying, it wouldn't be of any help to me in the test as I needed to quickly reference and find them. My own personal binders has a Table of Contents on how to solve the same problems multiple ways. 

After all the studying I had approximately 600 or so problems. After taking this test 4 times, I can honestly say that you have to anticipate studying materials you haven't seen every single time. You would set yourself up for failure if you study what you thought was your weakness and didn't go beyond that. Even though I knew I was strong in Geotechnical morning type questions. I went back and study more for it and found problems I haven't encountered. 

Just make sure you weed out the problems that aren't relevant or up to codes such as Transportation questions from the 1999 NCEES. Don't assume the Depth would carry you. You should load up as much as you can studying for the morning session.

You will get it in the Fall. I promise you. 

 

Edited by Fisherman504

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...