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# of Hours of study & prep

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I studied 150 to 200 hours and passed on the first try on the Civil: Water Resources depth. I have very little experience in the construction, transportation and structures. I spend a lot of time on structures (~30-40 hours). Maybe 4 hours on construction and probably 16 hours on transportation. I focused on Water Resources since it was my depth. I studied over a sixth month period, but there was a 6 week period in the last eight weeks where I was totally wiped out from studying and I simply didn't study. It was a brain recharge. I pushed hard the last two weeks. Sample test, exam cafe. Probably averaged 4 hours a night.

Edited by bbrams

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1st try - 40 hours - score 67

2nd try - 50 hours - score 66

3rd try - >200 hours - score 83

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1st try - Flipped through the MERM for 6 minutes waiting for them to open the doors on the day of the exam - score 99.8

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more number of hours of study is not always a positive result in exam. I studied my ass off last time i failed. I did not study much this time, studied veryy selective and passed. Not trying to give an impression to anyone that study less is good option. Just that i did not sweat lot this time as i already studied last time, just kind of a refresher. I did not try to study covering more topic this time too. I took a review and workshop class and just tried to hit hard on some selective topic and it worked for me

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I passed the civil structural, the first time, by studying the NCEES practice problems for the civil exam and the structural I exam - I found the structural I practice problems to be extremely good practice for the structural depth of the civil PE. (not only does it help you with the difficulty regime and scope, but the problems can be very good practice. by very good practice, I mean they were very good practice.)

I did the 6-minute solutions for the structural I (which I heard were similar to the 6 minute solutions for the structural depth) and they did refresh some concepts and code checks in my mind, but were in no way similar to the exam problems. NCEES practice problems were much more on target.

I started studying in January, and tried to hit the books at least every week, mostly on the weekends. Maybe 3 to 5 hours during the work week - more intense during the weekend.

The amount of studying you do will be directly dependent upon how much you remember from school and what you actually do in practice at your job. Being a blast engineer, I'm not as familiar with IBC, AASHTO, etc - but I have an extremely strong grasp of the key principles of structural engineering and design. So, I took the Civil PE with structural depth, learned all the easy general Civil stuff (general civil morning can't be hard - it's not in-depth enough to be hard) and focused on honing my structures knowledge for the afternoon into a razor-sharp tool of engineering knowledge destruction. it worked

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I took the CE test last spring (2009) and if I had to guess... I probably studied for around 300 hours. I didn't pass. But what I learned was I spent way too much time reviewing EVERYTHING in the CERM. I did every problem in the supplemental questions book which was probably a mistake. When I got the breakdown of my failed test I aced the morning but bombed the afternoon (got a 65% overall).

Soooo, for the spring 2010 exam I spent an additional 60-80 hours or so reviewing everything I could get my hands on related to Transportation. I should have realized this before because my degree is in Forestry Engineering (no highway design classes) and I am not a Transportation Engineer.

If I had to do it all over I probably whould have touched on main topics is the CERM but really devoted more time to my afternoon focus. All in all I left the test this year with a ton more confidence and can't wait to get my results!

Edited by J4S0NI2ICE

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I took chem e the first time in april '10.

I studied for about 200 hours, literally until I couldn't think of any other material to cover. I'd say, which was probably way more than I needed (I hope, right?)

Here's what I did:

I took the practice test untimed and I got more than half right.

My first order of business was to work on the weak parts that the test identified (in my case, distillation, adsorption, mass transfer, and indexing "trivia" sections in the ChERM 5th ed.) until they were strong parts, using the Lindeburg supplemental problems*.

I remembered from the FE that there would be some questions in the practice exam that were almost exactly like what appeared on the real test but that the practice test is a lot harder...it wasn't quite like that this time. The practice test was only a little harder, but not as much of a copy of the real test. It was still waay closer than any of the ppi problems.

My second order of business was to get to where I could do any of the sample test problems in under two minutes without using any published references (unless it was a steam table, TEMA table, or a "trivia" section). I made a single page crib sheet that contained the most common constants in different unit systems, hard to find conversion factors, and common mistakes (ie how to spot where they are trying to trip me up on a unit conversion, wt% vs fraction, etc.), and other notes to myself.

Anything that required an involved method (such as the NTU for heat exchangers) got a separate crib sheet that explained the fastest way to group terms to get it done in under two minutes. I went through the practice test a third time to verify that I could recognize everything in it and solve it from memory in under two minutes.

My third order of business was to go through the exam topic specifications line-by-line and read textbook chapters on them. I would also do a couple fundamentals problems out of the relevant textbooks' relevant chapters if I got the feeling that was necessary (did a lot of extra work on VLE, for instance).

I also took a lot of notes that simplified the concepts in the textbooks in the ways that I thought NCEES could actually formulate a test question about them. I feel like this was where I made most of my key breakthroughs in preparation. I also indexed Perry's for the trivia sections around this point.

My fourth order of business, the last thing I did, was read through the practice test problems a fourth time. This time, I read it really close, in order to see into the mind of NCEES, if you'll pardon the expression. My main purpose was to try and visualize what other NCEES problems might look like, what could they change about the questions over these topics without making them prohibitively difficult, what did I see in the textbooks that these problems demonstrate, what "trivia" do the solutions of the problems infer. Stuff like that.

Now, I haven't gotten my results yet, but I did finish an 8 hour test in under 5:30.

*supplemental problems were for the 6th ed, so it was kinda confusing at first because I had the 5th ed. ChERM. I read here that the 5th ed. is superior to the 6th ed for chemical, so I guess I got lucky.

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I took the Civil/Geotech in April of this year - Still don't have results back. I took a PE review class which I actually found to be pretty worthless other than one of the sessions. Was out of town for work so only went to four of the sessions (8 hours a pop for 32 hrs) and then studied for about 2.5 days before the test (so 25 hours there) for a total of about 60 hours. I felt pretty comfortable and thought that I had more than enough time on the test. In retrospect I should have just not taken the review class and spent that time doing my own review.

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There may be a post like this out there, but I didn't find it...

Anyway:

How many hours did you study - 275

# of times you've taken the test - 1

Let's see if hours studied relates to success...

Study time - <12 hours. I reviewed the sample test twice and made sure I fully understood the concepts and solutions to each problem. I also made sure I knew how to quickly find information in all of the ASHRAE books and MERM.

# of times taken the test -1

Took mechanical exam with HVAC in the afternoon. I was lucky enough to have passed on the first time.

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Studied maybe 80-100 hours. All of it was studying the NCEES sample exam for mechanical. I worked the whole thing twice through and made sure I understood every question.

Mechanical Thermal Fluids.

Took it once and passed. Got an 88, but I only felt like I got 55 out of 80 questions correct.

Edited by txaggie04PE

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Studied on my own for a total of about 200 hours. Took Civil Construction PM and passed first try. Actually spent the majority of my time (75% or more) studying for AM portion. After taking the test, I feel like I definitely spent too much time on studying Stuctures for AM as the structural questions on test weren't as involved as I thought they would be.

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Took the Mechanical PE Exam for the first time in April 2010. 5 yrs out of college. Took the testmasters review course. About 100 Hours of class. Spent about 60 hours studying outside of class, practice problems, tabbing ASHRAE manuals, MERM, etc. Took HVAC depth, passed with 87.

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I probably studied around 150 - 200 hours. Passed on the first time, so it was well worth it.

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I spent around 200 hours studying and passed the Civil-Structural on the first attempt.

It took about 50 hours of studying before I gained confidence in transpo, geotech, and water. That's roughly 16 hours per subject. Out of the 200 hours, I spent 25% or so studying for the afternoon portion.

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I spent 275 hours studying for the Electrical Power exam. Some of that time was spent prepping materials and organizing, but all time counts.

Power Systems Analysis was key and so was Intro to Electric Power Systems (Goetze)

Passed 1st attempt.

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I took chem e the first time in april '10.

I studied for about 200 hours, literally until I couldn't think of any other material to cover. I'd say, which was probably way more than I needed (I hope, right?)

Here's what I did:

I took the practice test untimed and I got more than half right.

My first order of business was to work on the weak parts that the test identified (in my case, distillation, adsorption, mass transfer, and indexing "trivia" sections in the ChERM 5th ed.) until they were strong parts, using the Lindeburg supplemental problems*.

I remembered from the FE that there would be some questions in the practice exam that were almost exactly like what appeared on the real test but that the practice test is a lot harder...it wasn't quite like that this time. The practice test was only a little harder, but not as much of a copy of the real test. It was still waay closer than any of the ppi problems.

My second order of business was to get to where I could do any of the sample test problems in under two minutes without using any published references (unless it was a steam table, TEMA table, or a "trivia" section). I made a single page crib sheet that contained the most common constants in different unit systems, hard to find conversion factors, and common mistakes (ie how to spot where they are trying to trip me up on a unit conversion, wt% vs fraction, etc.), and other notes to myself.

Anything that required an involved method (such as the NTU for heat exchangers) got a separate crib sheet that explained the fastest way to group terms to get it done in under two minutes. I went through the practice test a third time to verify that I could recognize everything in it and solve it from memory in under two minutes.

My third order of business was to go through the exam topic specifications line-by-line and read textbook chapters on them. I would also do a couple fundamentals problems out of the relevant textbooks' relevant chapters if I got the feeling that was necessary (did a lot of extra work on VLE, for instance).

I also took a lot of notes that simplified the concepts in the textbooks in the ways that I thought NCEES could actually formulate a test question about them. I feel like this was where I made most of my key breakthroughs in preparation. I also indexed Perry's for the trivia sections around this point.

My fourth order of business, the last thing I did, was read through the practice test problems a fourth time. This time, I read it really close, in order to see into the mind of NCEES, if you'll pardon the expression. My main purpose was to try and visualize what other NCEES problems might look like, what could they change about the questions over these topics without making them prohibitively difficult, what did I see in the textbooks that these problems demonstrate, what "trivia" do the solutions of the problems infer. Stuff like that.

Now, I haven't gotten my results yet, but I did finish an 8 hour test in under 5:30.

*supplemental problems were for the 6th ed, so it was kinda confusing at first because I had the 5th ed. ChERM. I read here that the 5th ed. is superior to the 6th ed for chemical, so I guess I got lucky.

I passed, but RI only reports pass/fail. I will email the board and see if they can tell me what my score was.

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I started keeping track of my time, but there were too many hours and I gave up... I studied 8-10 hours Sat and Sun, and 3 hours as many weeknights I could manage. I started about 4 months before the exam-- Good luck!

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I probably put in 30-40 hours of useful studying...

I took the Environmental exam and bought one of the DVD prep courses...found it very useful to focus my efforts.

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There may be a post like this out there, but I didn't find it...

Anyway:

How many hours did you study - 275

# of times you've taken the test - 1

Let's see if hours studied relates to success...

I went overboard. I studied about 390 hours over 6 1/2 months.

It paid off because I took the Electrical Power Exam once and passed (received my results today)!

I have been out of college since 1991 but completed my masters in 2006. I felt I needed the extra study time just to get back in the groove.

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I did not plan on passing the first time, due to time constraints, and only truly studied for less than 15 hours. I also spend 5 hours one day correcting errata in all my code and ppi books. I did go all out on my Ultimate Book Cart and this helped since I have a talent of remembering where I saw something and in what book.

Passed first attempt.

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Studied about 80-90 hours total, began 2 month prior to the April exam

tried to study enough to pass due to busy family life and work life - worked out for me Passed on 1st attempt

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I didn't keep track, but figured I studied about 250 hours total over about 3 1/2 months. I took the Mechanical-HVAC depth and passed first try.

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I just took the Mechanical PE Exam, Thermofluids module. I haven't received my results yet, (Wonderful state of Mass.), however I should find out any day?!?!

I started studying beginning of Feb. for April 16 exam. I spent every Saturday in library for 4-6 hours, (40-60 hrs.), I studied at home for 1-2 hours every Sunday (10-20 hrs.) and I studied at lunch at work for about 30-45 min. 2-3 times/week. (10-20 hrs.). So total study time was between 60-100 hours. Also, I took the FE Exam and passed the first try in April 2009 and I graduated with my BSME in May 2009. I went to school at night for 6 years and have 10+ years engineering-related working experience which is why I was able to sit for the exam so quick. I decided not to study as much as others for the PE exam since I was still pretty fresh from school and studying for the FE exam. In retrospect I would have liked to study more, however I also took the GMAT in beginning of Feb. and my wife and I have 11-mo. old twins. So I happy in that I studied as much as reasonable.

I think I passed, however I'd say that I'm between 60-70% confident, not as high as I would like. Hopefully I find out soon!!!

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Took Civil/Structural. Passed first attempt Studied about 70 hours including a review class. Important to review all the breadth but don't go crazy. Spend most of your time on depth questions.

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I just took the Mechanical PE Exam, Thermofluids module. I haven't received my results yet, (Wonderful state of Mass.), however I should find out any day?!?!

I started studying beginning of Feb. for April 16 exam. I spent every Saturday in library for 4-6 hours, (40-60 hrs.), I studied at home for 1-2 hours every Sunday (10-20 hrs.) and I studied at lunch at work for about 30-45 min. 2-3 times/week. (10-20 hrs.). So total study time was between 60-100 hours. Also, I took the FE Exam and passed the first try in April 2009 and I graduated with my BSME in May 2009. I went to school at night for 6 years and have 10+ years engineering-related working experience which is why I was able to sit for the exam so quick. I decided not to study as much as others for the PE exam since I was still pretty fresh from school and studying for the FE exam. In retrospect I would have liked to study more, however I also took the GMAT in beginning of Feb. and my wife and I have 11-mo. old twins. So I happy in that I studied as much as reasonable.

I think I passed, however I'd say that I'm between 60-70% confident, not as high as I would like. Hopefully I find out soon!!!

Just found out today that I passed! Woot!!

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