Is it possible to get into a Graduate/Master of Engineer program if my Bachelor is not related? how? - General Engineering - Engineer Boards Jump to content
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Is it possible to get into a Graduate/Master of Engineer program if my Bachelor is not related? how?


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I believe that at many schools you can pursue a Masters that's not related to your Bachelors, but you will have to complete any prerequisites that you don't have. In engineering that probably means taking all of the undergrad engineering courses related to your Masters focus. You may not immediately be admitted to the engineering school as a grad student; rather you might have to start as a undeclared or general studies grad student until you complete the necessary prerequisites. But like others have said, it all varies by school.

Edited by jean15paul_PE
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  • 4 months later...

my PM has undergrad in physics & math and then an MSEE. 

I went for a MSNukeE with my BSECE. Online learning doesn't work for me so all plans for any masters program were abandoned lol 

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On 8/25/2019 at 8:08 PM, johnnxiv said:
My Bachelor is Information Technology

Answer: Yes.

Solution: First, reach out to the department chair (ideally, the graduate coordinator for your intended program) and let them know the situation and ask what coursework the want to see you complete. Office of graduate studies would be your second choice, they won't be quite as well-versed in the department requirements. In the meantime, pick up all the math (the entire calc series through ODE, likely linear algebra also), general physics (the entire series through modern physics, some schools are OK stopping at electricity & magnetism, YMMV), chemistry (usually general chemistry I is sufficient, but I took up to II and OChem), lower division engineering (statics for sure, circuits 1, dynamics, and materials engr if available, I did) at your local community college to start building your case that you're prepared for further studies in upper division engineering courses (because you will need to take ALL those courses anyway). At this point, unless you're independently wealthy, I wouldn't bother applying for a second bachelors. Do it if you want, but it's not necessary and was not any kind of obstacle to getting licensed. Stay laser-focused, it will take some time. Also, take the GRE and get a decent score on the quantitative portion. Before doing ALLLL of that though, really look inside and decide if this is what you really (I mean REALLY) want. If so, go for it. I'm from Silicon Valley so to my mind you can already make a decent living doing I.T.-type work anyway. YMMV.

Supporting info: BA English and French, MS Mech. Engr.

Total time to completion: ~6 years part-time (~4 while taking evening CC classes and working full-time and exactly 2 full-time years in grad school).

Edited by squaretaper LIT AF PE
added Circuits 1 (this was hard)
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2 minutes ago, squaretaper LIT AF PE said:

Answer: Yes.

Solution: First, reach out to the department chair (ideally, the graduate coordinator for your intended program) and let them know the situation and ask what coursework the want to see you complete. Office of graduate studies would be your second choice, they won't be quite as well-versed in the department requirements. In the meantime, pick up all the math (the entire calc series through ODE, likely linear algebra also), general physics (the entire series through modern physics, some schools are OK stopping at electricity & magnetism, YMMV), chemistry (usually general chemistry I is sufficient, but I took up to II and OChem), lower division engineering (statics for sure, dynamics and materials engr if available, I did) at your local community college to start building your case that you're prepared for further studies in upper division engineering courses (because you will need to take ALL those courses anyway). At this point, unless you're independently wealthy, I wouldn't bother applying for a second bachelors. Do it if you want, but it's not necessary and was not any kind of obstacle to getting licensed. Stay laser-focused, it will take some time. Also, take the GRE and get a decent score on the quantitative portion. Before doing ALLLL of that though, really look inside and decide if this is what you really (I mean REALLY) want. If so, go for it. I'm from Silicon Valley so to my mind you can already make a decent living doing I.T.-type work anyway. YMMV.

Supporting info: BA English and French, MS Mech. Engr.

Total time to completion: ~6 years part-time (~4 while taking evening CC classes and working full-time and exactly 2 full-time years in grad school).

This is a very good outline of how things will probably go... but with a Mechanical Engineer leaning. I don't think the OP said what discipline he's interested in pursuing. 

But I agree with @squaretaper LIT AF PE, the department would definitely tell you what's required.

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3 minutes ago, jean15paul_PE said:

... but with a Mechanical Engineer leaning.

You think so? I wasn't deliberately trying to bias it towards mechanical. I thought everyone had to take the math, calc, and physics series? I mean, it's all lower division so it should carry to whatever discipline OP wants. (I did mention that Chem II, OChem, and materials + dynamics were optional).

I dunno, part of this exercise is also in problem solving and grit, so OP will find a way if they want it enough. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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18 minutes ago, squaretaper LIT AF PE said:

You think so? I wasn't deliberately trying to bias it towards mechanical. I thought everyone had to take the math, calc, and physics series? I mean, it's all lower division so it should carry to whatever discipline OP wants. (I did mention that Chem II, OChem, and materials + dynamics were optional).

I dunno, part of this exercise is also in problem solving and grit, so OP will find a way if they want it enough. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

I don't know. I saw static, dynamics, materials, and thought mechanical engineering... If it was electrical or chemical or something, those probably wouldn't be applicable. Even if they were required for an undergrad degree, they probably aren't prerequisites for any other classes, so that's the thing you might be allowed to skip. (My university didn't offer Chemical Engineering, but the Electrical Engineers took a single 3-credit Static-Dynamic combination course.)

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2 minutes ago, jean15paul_PE said:

Even if they were required for an undergrad degree, they probably aren't prerequisites for any other classes

Ah, makes sense! That's why, at the end of the day, OP has to ask the department directly so they don't waste any time taking unnecessary classes like I did (oops).

And...I forgot to add Circuits so I'll add that to the list above.

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6 hours ago, squaretaper LIT AF PE said:

You think so? I wasn't deliberately trying to bias it towards mechanical. I thought everyone had to take the math, calc, and physics series? I mean, it's all lower division so it should carry to whatever discipline OP wants. (I did mention that Chem II, OChem, and materials + dynamics were optional).

I dunno, part of this exercise is also in problem solving and grit, so OP will find a way if they want it enough. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

I didn't have to take modern physics and was able to mostly skirt around E&M... And I don't even know enough about circuits to meaningfully tell you what I don't know about circuits.

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6 minutes ago, Will.I.Am PE said:

And I don't even know enough about circuits to meaningfully tell you what I don't know about circuits

Something something keep your fingers outta there something something.

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3 minutes ago, squaretaper LIT AF PE said:

Something something don't stick your tongue in there something something.

FIFY.

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