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Can I take California PE exam in other state?


pangbaby

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for example, in DC area?

I am planning to take the california PE exam next year, since they don't require many year's experience. But do I have to fly to california to take the test? Is there a testing location in the eastern area?

Thanks!

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for example, in DC area?

I am planning to take the california PE exam next year, since they don't require many year's experience. But do I have to fly to california to take the test? Is there a testing location in the eastern area?

Thanks!

You can get somebody to proctor the test for you. But getting a California PE will probably only help you if you want to practice in California, because other states may not accept it for comity if you don't meet their minimum experience requirements. Better check it all out with the California board and the board of any state where you want to practice.

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Yes, to your question.

I did apply CA this summer and took my PE exam in CA (San Deigo - 15 mins walking from hotel to the testing location) this OCt. I currently work in NY (only 2.5 years experiences) However, once you pass your PE that you will still need to wait until you meet your experience in your state and apply to transfer the license to your state (you need to pay application in your state but you don't need to take the PE exam again)...I have 5 to 6 coworkers pass their PE exam in CA and 2 of them already transfer to NY already.

Fairplex is another choice because the hotel is right next to the testing center. You only need take bus for few stop to the airport.

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You can take the national portion ofthe PE Civil exam anywhere, but the special surveying & special seismic exams I believe have to be taken in CA.

Nothing like flying cross country to take a test!!

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OK, I guess flying to CA is the best solution. Thanks! I may give it a try, since I really don't want to wait 4 years to get my first PE license (plus, the company has some salary incentive for PEs, i guess it doesn't matter where you get your PE license)

btw, are you a Civil Engineer? One thing that bothers me is that i didn't learn survey and seismic in school, so i don't know whether i can pass the CA PE exam by learning it by myself...hope it is not too hard.

Yes, to your question.

I did apply CA this summer and took my PE exam in CA (San Deigo - 15 mins walking from hotel to the testing location) this OCt. I currently work in NY (only 2.5 years experiences) However, once you pass your PE that you will still need to wait until you meet your experience in your state and apply to transfer the license to your state (you need to pay application in your state but you don't need to take the PE exam again)...I have 5 to 6 coworkers pass their PE exam in CA and 2 of them already transfer to NY already.

Fairplex is another choice because the hotel is right next to the testing center. You only need take bus for few stop to the airport.

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Why are you taking it in California unless you plan on practicing there?

Many states won't accept your California PE for comity if you didn't meet their requirements for experience at the time you took the PE exam. This means you will have to retake the exam to get licensed in many other states.

Also note that NCEES will no longer allow proctoring in the near future, so I don't know if you will be able to have it proctored if it is a NCEES administered exam.

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Why are you taking it in California unless you plan on practicing there?

Many states won't accept your California PE for comity if you didn't meet their requirements for experience at the time you took the PE exam. This means you will have to retake the exam to get licensed in many other states.

Also note that NCEES will no longer allow proctoring in the near future, so I don't know if you will be able to have it proctored if it is a NCEES administered exam.

The reason is simple!

CA can allow you to take the PE exam (NCEEs) with only 2 years experience. For example that NY required 4 years of experience to take the PE exam. While waiting for extra 2 years that why not take in CA. However, you need to apply NY and paid for the application fee again but you DO NOT NEED TO TAKE THE PE EXAM AGAIN (That is list in NCEEs NY board requirement)

http://www.ncees.org/Licensing_boards.php?...xamRequirements

"If a comity applicant took the PE examination in another jurisdiction before obtaining the experience required in your jurisdiction, would your statutes require that the applicant retake the PE examination, even if the applicant has the experience required by your jurisdiction at the time of comity application?

No "

That is quote from NCEEs in NY board.

However, I do see some other states answer YES. So you need to take the PE again even if you just want transfer here.

Two of my coworkers already take the PE (one eletrical and one mechanical) in CA and wait two years and transfer back to NY already.

My coworker mention to me about one thing and made my took my PE in CA. He said " you never know that after two years you will still have free time to prepare for the exam"

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Chaocl,

If it were me (which it's not), I wouldn't trust the NCEES survey. The survey shows that Montana doesn't care if you take the PE exam early. However, during the August meeting, the board rejected 3 - 5 people that took the exam early. For what it is worth, check with the laws of your state first.

Second, what if you want to get licensed in a state that does care later on? Then you would have to retake the exam.

For what it is worth, I wouldn't try taking the exam early and then try to get comity to skirt the rules.

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Guest Dexman1349

Personally I don't find the value in getting a PE if you can't use it (or have no intention of using it). Having a Cali PE and working in NY won't allow you to do any additional work in NY. I'm not even certain you would get a raise for it. Then youhave to consider your states laws when it comes to comity. Despite the fact that Cali uses the same NCEES survey as 35 other states, it doesn't mean it's WORTH the same in other states.

I know in Illinois they will deny comity to a cali license because they require you have 4 years experience BEFORE you can apply to take the exam.

Check your laws, then check your reasoning why you're doingit. If you do it, I wish you luck.

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This is a very interesting thread...

I've heard NCEES is against jurisdiction shopping and a national registry of applicants would solve that. Do I understand right that there are some people who are properly licensed in one state (meeting their education, experience, and examination requirements) who are not eligible for a comity application because they didn't (at the time!) meet the new state's experience criteria required to take the examination - even though they meet the new state's experience requirement at the time of comity application?

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Guest Dexman1349

Yes you are IlPadrino. For the most part, if you have 4 years experience and passed the exam (regardless of order), you're ok. However there a few states that have an issue. My office manager took the exam shortly after graduating (because he could back then in the state he got his initial license, Michigan), he waited the 4 years and got his Michigan license. However, he then applied to Illinois (I think), and they wouldn't provide comity because they required you have 4 years experience BEFORE the exam was taken. Consequently, he has 20+ years experience, 6 or 7 different PE licenses, but not in Illinois.

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Sraymond,

Yes, I also have read that the NCEES is against taking exams in states that you don't live in. It bugs the heck out of me because the decision on whether you should be licensed in a particular state is solely up to that state. For example, the Washington State Board doesn't get to say if I should get licensed in Nevada or not if I would like to pursue licensure in Nevada. The NCEES has a concern that a person can retake the exam an excessive number of times by applying to a variety of state boards. I am pretty sure that they have announced they will not allow proctored exams in the future which will effectively shut down this problem.

To answer your question, yes you are correct. Here is an excerpt from the Montana State Board minutes last August:

"Rodney Burrows – Professional Engineer by Comity Rodney Burrows submitted an application for professional engineer by comity on June 17, 2009.Mr. Burrows did not have the required four years of engineering experience prior to taking the professional engineer exam.

Motion: David Elias moved to deny the application of Rodney Burrows in accordance with 37-67-306(3) MCA. Jake Neil seconded the motion. The motion carried.

The Board recommended that Rodney Burrows apply for the Professional Engineer by exam. Mr. Burrows does meet the minimum qualifications to sit for the professional engineer exam in order to obtain licensure in Montana as a professional engineer."

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Guest Dexman1349

Photo,

You're right in saying that each state should not have control over which states you get your licensure from. However, NCEES is opposed to "shopping" for a license. This is where you get your license in a state with lower standards (fewer years experience, easier application, etc), just so you can bypass the requirements for your state. Like I said above, most states have very similar standards so this *usually* isn't an issue, but a few do exist.

One other thing to consider if you want to get your license in Cali and "back-door" your way into your NY PE: If you want to get licensure in a 3rd state (say Conn), the comity is based off of your original "Primary" license (Cali). I have been told that your primary license has to be current if you want to get comity in another state. Thus, it you would have to keep your cali license current. You can NOT use your NY license, because comity was used to obtain it. I'm not 100% on this.

In addition to the cost of maintaining your primary, you also have to maintain your continuing education requirements.

Edit: I was just told by several co-workers who have multiple licenses that if your primary license lapses, the states you have comity in will also become invalid and thus VERY difficult to get back as well as apply to new states.

IMO, it's not worth the added time and money to get your Primary license in a state where you don't (or have no intention to) work in.

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I think there might be a slight misunderstanding of comity.

When I apply to another state with comity, I have to fill out the complete application (experience, references, work history, etc) just as if I was a regular applicant. The only thing that comity does is allow me not to take the exam if I meet all of the other state requirements. The engineer's license is much different than a reciprocal license, because you have to meet all of the state requirements for licensure in the state that you are applying.

A lot of people will use reciprocal license and comity interchangeably, but as I'm learning, engineering licenses are far from reciprocal.

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Guest Dexman1349

Just make sure you're on the same page as your state board. Some states may see it my way, others may see it yours. Either way, make sure you understand their position because they're the ones who make the call.

If you plan on needing multiple licenses, I would strongly suggest establishing an NCEES record. The NCEES will maintain your records and recommendations so that getting comity/reciprocity is handled correctly.

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I think there might be a slight misunderstanding of comity.

When I apply to another state with comity, I have to fill out the complete application (experience, references, work history, etc) just as if I was a regular applicant. The only thing that comity does is allow me not to take the exam if I meet all of the other state requirements. The engineer's license is much different than a reciprocal license, because you have to meet all of the state requirements for licensure in the state that you are applying.

A lot of people will use reciprocal license and comity interchangeably, but as I'm learning, engineering licenses are far from reciprocal.

Best explanation I ever heard is that a driver's license is reciprocal - you can use them in any state without have to register in those states. Comity is as you said - you have to meet the requirements and be approved by each state.

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Guest Dexman1349
When I apply to another state with comity, I have to fill out the complete application (experience, references, work history, etc) just as if I was a regular applicant. The only thing that comity does is allow me not to take the exam if I meet all of the other state requirements. The engineer's license is much different than a reciprocal license, because you have to meet all of the state requirements for licensure in the state that you are applying.

I'm not aware of any reciprocal licensure with engineering. It may exist, but to my knowledge you have to hold a PE in the state where the plans are to be used. ie. I have to hold a Cali license if I am stamping plans for a Cali project despite the fact I have a Colorado license.

I mis-understood the discussion for this. Re-evaluating my earlier post:

Once you get a primary license (lets say California), that license represents your examination (at least for other states). If you apply for comity (lets say New York), you have to fill out the entire application as if you are a new engineer, except that you provide your primary license information in place of the exam requirements. The new state (New York), has the option to accept or deny the exam substitution at thier descresion. This will then provide you a stand alone license that is not affected by your California license (except for criminal activity). If your Cali license expires, your NY license remains valid and vice-versa. (note: some states may differ from this, I am not aware of any that do).

Now lets say you want a 3rd license (New Jersey). When you apply for that license (again, filling out the entire application), you would then have to provide your Cali info first (because it's your primary license and represents your examination) and your NY info second (because you got it through comity). If your Cali license is no longer valid, you cannot substitute your NY license as your primary because you did not take an exam for NY. You would then have to re-instate your Cali license (which may include re-taking the exam) in order to complete the New Jersey comity application.

My key point is that it is critical that you keep your primary license current. If it lapses, you run the risk of not being able to obtain licensure in other states (or being able to re-instate your primary) without having to re-take the exam.

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I'm not aware of any reciprocal licensure with engineering. It may exist, but to my knowledge you have to hold a PE in the state where the plans are to be used. ie. I have to hold a Cali license if I am stamping plans for a Cali project despite the fact I have a Colorado license.

I mis-understood the discussion for this. Re-evaluating my earlier post:

Once you get a primary license (lets say California), that license represents your examination (at least for other states). If you apply for comity (lets say New York), you have to fill out the entire application as if you are a new engineer, except that you provide your primary license information in place of the exam requirements. The new state (New York), has the option to accept or deny the exam substitution at thier descresion. This will then provide you a stand alone license that is not affected by your California license (except for criminal activity). If your Cali license expires, your NY license remains valid and vice-versa. (note: some states may differ from this, I am not aware of any that do).

Now lets say you want a 3rd license (New Jersey). When you apply for that license (again, filling out the entire application), you would then have to provide your Cali info first (because it's your primary license and represents your examination) and your NY info second (because you got it through comity). If your Cali license is no longer valid, you cannot substitute your NY license as your primary because you did not take an exam for NY. You would then have to re-instate your Cali license (which may include re-taking the exam) in order to complete the New Jersey comity application.

My key point is that it is critical that you keep your primary license current. If it lapses, you run the risk of not being able to obtain licensure in other states (or being able to re-instate your primary) without having to re-take the exam.

You are right. But I do not plan to have a thrid license in other state now (I might change my mind when I was age 65 and +). It is a good advice to someone trying to get their PE license.

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Now lets say you want a 3rd license (New Jersey). When you apply for that license (again, filling out the entire application), you would then have to provide your Cali info first (because it's your primary license and represents your examination) and your NY info second (because you got it through comity). If your Cali license is no longer valid, you cannot substitute your NY license as your primary because you did not take an exam for NY. You would then have to re-instate your Cali license (which may include re-taking the exam) in order to complete the New Jersey comity application.

That's news to me (not saying it ain't so, though!). It would present some difficult in management, though, as I'm not aware of any state that verifies licensure differently for those granted a license by comity. Do most comity applications require verification of examination by NCEES directly?

I'd think this issue varies by state - each one may handle the application by comity differently.

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I don't believe you the Montana board requires continuous licensure in the state where you took the test this is the case for the Montana board. I'm pretty sure I've seen in their minutes where a person was originally licensed in Montana, got comity somewhere else, let their Montana license lapse, and then applied for comity in Montana years later. But I don't have the time to dig through the state meeting minutes to verify.

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I been told a long time ago that if you apply to take the CA PE exam that your result will be only in the CA (paid every application, and all documents that required...plus they might reject). Later on if you pass and you want to transfer your CA PE license to NY that you need to submit everything to NY (paid application fee, working experience, education, photos, and every required documents.... NY board can still reject you because you did not meet the requirement or other issues). However, before you did taking any FE or PE exam that ask before you act.

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Starting with the October 2010 exam, the NCEES will no longer recognize proctored exams. That means that if you sit for the exam in New York, your results will go to the New York Board.

(http://www.ncees.org/About_NCEES/Licensure_Exchange/Licensure_Exchange/Licensure_Exchange_August_2009.php)

what does it mean?

If I took in CA PE that the result will be on the CA website and I will have the CA PE license number. (That is always this way....if you take your PE exam in A state that your result will be on the A state). I don't see any problem with transfer your license to another states unless you meet the requirement in another state.

Let's say I am a good student that I educated in NY from ABET school. I pass my FE and 4 years design experience in NY. When I want to take my PE exam in NY that all my family must moved to CA or other states. It is just unfair to those people who have to move to another states before they obtain their PE license.

I 100% belived that this NCEES action will ban because this is unconstitutional because the college study for 4 years and 4 years working experience will be only good in your state only. "NCEES limit that you can only get the PE license in your states only"----some people can said if there is a limit that you just simply not take it! But people can set up their goal in senior year in high school by that time they didn't set up limit yet!!!

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