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Structural Problems - AM Breadth


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#1 Lucky1

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 04:02 PM

Morning Breadth Exam - Structural Problems

Any recommendations on the best resources to prepare for these problems?
Some of the 6 MS problems are more oriented for those taking the structural depth since they are more code related. Plus the 6 MS problems don't seem too representative of the exam when compared to the NCEES sample questions book.
Any strategies for this portion of the morning exam would be appreciated.

#2 Dexman PE PMP

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 04:13 PM

I found the CERM to be enough for the entire AM session. Granted I used the 10th edition back in April 2008, so the test may have evolved a little, but I would imagine it hasn't changed much.

#3 Jacob_PE

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 05:36 PM

QUOTE (Dexman PE @ Sep 2 2011, 11:13 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I found the CERM to be enough for the entire AM session. Granted I used the 10th edition back in April 2008, so the test may have evolved a little, but I would imagine it hasn't changed much.

When you say 'enough' for the entire AM session, had you studied the CERM at great length and it helped you to be able to solve the problems easily, or do you mean that the look up questions were easily found in the CERM?

#4 Dexman PE PMP

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Posted 02 September 2011 - 06:05 PM

When I studied I read, tabbed, and highlighted the entire CERM. My studying involved learning my references at the expense of doing problems. And by read the CERM, I mean I sat down and read it cover to cover like a novel. I read it completely through at least twice and would re-read several sections if I didn't understand things the first/second/third time through, or if I had identified specific areas indicated on the NCEES outline that needed to be focused on.

Aside from taking a couple practice exams, I didn't do any practice problems (this approach is not recommended for everyone). After a few months of reading, highlighting, and re-reading the CERM, I could easily use a few key words from the problem on the exam as a means to look up similar examples within the CERM. By combining equations used in the example problems with the proper unit conversions (including the units indicated within the problem and answer itself), I could get the right equations setup to work the problem. I relied alot on those example problems to at least get me pointed in the right direction.

Most people really don't understand all that the CERM has to offer because they don't take the time to at least skim through all of the topics and sub-topics. Yes, spending a few hours tabbing each chapter and section is helpful, but I wanted to learn more about the chapter than just the title. I was able to find a ton of construction related information within the sub-chapters of the 10th edition of the CERM (before it was revised to provide a specific "construction" section) back when I took the first offering of the construction depth in April 2008 (before there was any real study info specific to construction). From what I've seen in the 11th Edition (and probably the 12th as well), is that alot of this construction stuff is still in the original sub-chapters, and that you should not assume that all construction info is contained in the construciton section. For example, sometimes it's just easier to explain the construction related to structures within the structures section so that all of the information remains in context.

#5 dmparri3

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Posted 07 September 2011 - 03:47 PM

Here's what I did for the AM and I passed and felt I did really well on this section:
1. Ignore the CERM problems unless you have tons of free time and want to be able to teach a review course. In reality, the exam questions for the AM aren't that hard and if you already have a BSCE from an ABET school, you should be familiar with all of the subject matter anyway.
2. Do all of the 6 min. solutions breadth problems first.
3. Do all of the NCEES breadth problems next (the closer to the exam, the better since these are more representative of the exam problems).
4. The only reference that I used for the AM was the CERM and working through these problems will familiarize you with the appropriate sections.
5. After you've worked these problems, check the NCEES outline to make sure that you've covered all of the areas. Working through the 6 min. solutions and NCEES problems will cover most of these areas.
6. Review any areas from the outline that you aren't comfortable with.
7. Ace the AM section of the exam and relax in the PM! smile.gif

#6 Lucky1

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Posted 30 September 2011 - 11:15 AM

QUOTE (dmparri3 @ Sep 7 2011, 08:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Here's what I did for the AM and I passed and felt I did really well on this section:
1. Ignore the CERM problems unless you have tons of free time and want to be able to teach a review course. In reality, the exam questions for the AM aren't that hard and if you already have a BSCE from an ABET school, you should be familiar with all of the subject matter anyway.
2. Do all of the 6 min. solutions breadth problems first.
3. Do all of the NCEES breadth problems next (the closer to the exam, the better since these are more representative of the exam problems).
4. The only reference that I used for the AM was the CERM and working through these problems will familiarize you with the appropriate sections.
5. After you've worked these problems, check the NCEES outline to make sure that you've covered all of the areas. Working through the 6 min. solutions and NCEES problems will cover most of these areas.
6. Review any areas from the outline that you aren't comfortable with.
7. Ace the AM section of the exam and relax in the PM! smile.gif


Thanks for your input. This looks like a great plan. I'm trying to minimize any surprises and was looking for confirmation that the 6 min. solutions and NCEES breadth problems would be adequate for this topic.



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