The path to a 200k annual pay (on an hourly basis)

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rppearso

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I am a dual discipline PE in Electrical and Chemical engineering (degree in ChE and minor in EE/mathematics). I used to work in oil and gas making like 140k a year and got caught in a mass layoff. Some substitute teaching and odd stints with telco companies and contractors and I'm at like 85k a year.

What is the path to 200k a year, is that pretty much unheard of in our stagflation economy or is it reasonably doable? I live in Anchorage AK and pretty much anything happening (house repairs, etc) is an astronomical amount of money, even just materials. I am looking to do some contracting on nights and weekends as well. Is there a good resource for remote contract jobs I can do at my own pace and distance?

I was set up to have my investments working for me so I could just do what I wanted like get an advanced degree in mathematics and maybe study magnetohydrodynamics and wakefield accelerators but the economic situation in America is becoming untenable, basically if a window breaks in our house we have to get a second job.

How is everyone else doing this? Does it feel like engineering is a hobby and you have to do other things to build wealth so you can do engineering/science?
 
What is the path to 200k a year... ...or is it reasonably doable?
For engineering? Yes, it's doable, but that's on the far right side of the salary curve. No engineer should expect to get there 10 years after school.
You typically need to move into a management track and have a lot of experience.
There are a few sub-disciplines and areas where its more common. Generally you are looking at defense contractors, some national labs, and of course the big companies in Silicon Valley. The former two will require a lot of experience. The latter is just being that good, and some luck.
It's more likely in some disciplines that others: nuclear, petro, some computer engineers, and to a lesser extent systems engineers/logistics come to mind.

I used to work in oil and gas making like 140k a year and got caught in a mass layoff.
That is the nature of petroleum sector. Feast or famine. Aerospace is similar.

Does it feel like engineering is a hobby and you have to do other things to build wealth so you can do engineering/science?
No. Engineering is my career. I live comfortably.
 

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