Jump to content


Photo

References for the Construction Depth


46 replies to this topic

#1 Road Guy

Road Guy

    35 years and a wakeup

  • Admin
  • 17,954 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Colorado
  • Interests:Yoga Pants, Ski!, SCUBA, Backpacking, Kicking Ass, etc
  • Discipline:Construction

Posted 03 February 2009 - 04:45 AM

Since this is a new module, what references did you use for the exam?

Trying to build a sticky to help current and future test takers...

#2 SPSUEngineer

SPSUEngineer

    Civil Site Engineer

  • Senior Member
  • 205 posts
  • Location:Northeast Tennessee
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 03 February 2009 - 05:10 PM

Good idea road guy. I'm interested in knowing because some of the listed references cost $$$

#3 tymr

tymr

    Project Manager

  • Senior Member
  • 181 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Discipline:Construction

Posted 03 February 2009 - 09:39 PM

I own all of the NCEES recommended references and plan on taking them to the exam. Three additional references I like and plan on taking with me are Construction Planning, Equipment, and Methods by Peurifoy, etal; Standard Handbook for Civil Engineers by Ricketts, etal; and the Caterpillar Handbook.

#4 TXengrChickPE

TXengrChickPE

    Here we go Steelers, here we go!

  • EB Supporting Member
  • 1,667 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 03 February 2009 - 09:56 PM

QUOTE (Michael Miller @ Feb 3 2009, 11:10 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Good idea road guy. I'm interested in knowing because some of the listed references cost $$$

I don't know about the construction references... but I know that obtaining all of the structural references set me back quite a bit of $$$. Believe me, IT WAS WORTH IT!!! Sure, after the exam, I realized that I probably could have done without one or two of the recommended references... but it would have killed me to not have something that I did need.

My recommendation is to buy, borrow (or steal?) everything on the NCEES list.

#5 GerardCA

GerardCA

    Intern

  • EB.com member
  • 7 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Diego
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 31 July 2009 - 05:23 AM

Did someone use the Ruwan Rajapaske Construction Book?
I would like to know how good was this book for this module
thanks

#6 Guest_Dexman1349_*

Guest_Dexman1349_*
  • Guests

Posted 31 July 2009 - 01:51 PM

Some must haves:

CERM (latest version)
MUTCD
OSHA standards
Bob's Rigging and Crane Handbook (I think they're up to the 6th edition).

Having a timber/framing book would be helpful, as would one on Masonry, but I'm not really sure what's available or what is exactly on the NCEES list.

Obviously the remaining books on the NCEES list are also important, but I didn't have access to them when I took the exam back in April '08.

#7 ElCid03

ElCid03

    Lord of the Bunker

  • Veteran
  • 885 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Somewhere in Parwan Province
  • Interests:Dodging IDF, Jingle Trucks, and Old School Civilization.
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 05 August 2009 - 12:17 AM

QUOTE (TXengrChickPE @ Feb 3 2009, 05:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't know about the construction references... but I know that obtaining all of the structural references set me back quite a bit of $$$. Believe me, IT WAS WORTH IT!!! Sure, after the exam, I realized that I probably could have done without one or two of the recommended references... but it would have killed me to not have something that I did need.

My recommendation is to buy, borrow (or steal?) everything on the NCEES list.


This avatar is not fair!


#8 yatkins

yatkins

    Intern

  • Members
  • 31 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Los Angeles
  • Discipline:Construction

Posted 08 October 2009 - 10:08 PM

Does anyone else think the available review material for the construction portion sucks? The CERM covers very little and the sample problems from Lindberg have errors and don't even come from CERM material. The Ruwan book is very convoluted and disorganized. It would be nice to have a book written by somebody who has knowledge of the construction module. I've already offered my services to Ruwan to help edit his next edition.

#9 sgsmith2_PE

sgsmith2_PE

    Project Manager

  • Senior Member
  • 124 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fuquay-Varina, NC
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 09 October 2009 - 03:34 PM

Yatkins, agreed 200%. And to top it off, I took a $600 review course for the PE. When we got to the end of the class they were handing out practice tests for AM and PM disciplines. I got kind of excited because I thought I was going to get some good review questions. Of course, the guy is like oh yeah sorry we don't have a practice exam for the Construction PM part....arghhhh!!! In retrospect, I wish I would have signed up to take Geotech.

I'm not a fan of that new rule that you can only take the PM section that you put on your application...now I'm stuck with Construction...

#10 Guest_Dexman1349_*

Guest_Dexman1349_*
  • Guests

Posted 09 October 2009 - 11:36 PM

QUOTE (sgsmith2 @ Oct 9 2009, 09:34 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm not a fan of that new rule that you can only take the PM section that you put on your application...now I'm stuck with Construction...


WTF? Last I knew they just give you one booklet that contains all of the afternoon sections and you just have to fill in a bubble on the scantron form as to which one of the them you are answering.

Is this a state specific thing, or has the NCEES changed the rules?

#11 sgsmith2_PE

sgsmith2_PE

    Project Manager

  • Senior Member
  • 124 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fuquay-Varina, NC
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 14 October 2009 - 08:49 PM





QUOTE (Dexman1349 @ Oct 9 2009, 07:36 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
WTF? Last I knew they just give you one booklet that contains all of the afternoon sections and you just have to fill in a bubble on the scantron form as to which one of the them you are answering.

Is this a state specific thing, or has the NCEES changed the rules?





I think it may just be North Carolina...dunno. But I'm hating it now....lol.

#12 humner

humner

    Vice President

  • Veteran
  • 810 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 27 February 2010 - 09:03 PM

http://www.wsdot.wa....eldFormulas.pdf found this site, like the way the formulas are laid out

#13 humner

humner

    Vice President

  • Veteran
  • 810 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 01 March 2010 - 08:03 PM

Okay, here is another site for great downloads. You can download and print sections you need. http://www.iowadot.g...ual.html?reload

#14 wstahlm80

wstahlm80

    Intern

  • Members
  • 26 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St. Louis Metro
  • Discipline:Construction

Posted 17 July 2010 - 04:41 PM

Here are the References I have which have been useful:

Bob's Rigging & Crane Handbook "Sixth Edition" (The Hoisting Triangle)
Construction Planning, Equipment, and Methods
Estimating Construction Costs
Handbook of Temporary Structures in Construction
The Procedure Handbook of Arc Welding
ACI SP-4 Formwork for Concrete (includes ACI 347-04 Guide to Formwork for Concrete)
ACI 503 Building Code Requirements for Masonry Structures
ACI 318 Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete
Standard Practice for Bracing Masonry Walls Under Construction
PCA Concrete Inspection Handbook
ACI 347.2R-05 Guide for Shoring/Reshoring of Concrete Multistory Buildings
ASCE 37-02 Design Loads on Structures During Construction
ASCE 7-05 Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures
IBC 2006
PCA Design and Control of Concrete Mixtures
AASTHO A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets
MUTCD 2003
Highway Capacity Manual
Steel Construction Manual
Roadside Design Guide
29 CFR 1910
29 CFR 1926
OSHA Standards for General Industry
OSHA Standards for Construction Industry
NDS Wood Design Package
CSI MasterFormat


There are some other "texbooks" I have in my library which I may/may not bring that cover topics such as Reinforced Concrete, Water Resources, Geotechical Engineering, etc...but for the most part, this is what I wheel in for the afternoon.






#15 armenterosjl

armenterosjl

    Intern

  • Members
  • 11 posts
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 22 October 2010 - 12:15 AM

QUOTE (Road Guy @ Feb 3 2009, 12:45 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Since this is a new module, what references did you use for the exam?

Trying to build a sticky to help current and future test takers...


I used two references by the same author (Ruwan Rajapakse):
- Civil PE Exam Construction Module (Third Edition).
- Civil PE Exam Construction Module. Practice problems.
But take care, there are a lot of mistakes in those books.

#16 teamspears2010

teamspears2010

    Intern

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 16 December 2010 - 07:42 PM

I'm interested in taking the Construction portion. For those that took the exam, can you provide some feedback into what books were more helpful than others?

#17 jv21

jv21

    Principal in Charge

  • Senior Member
  • 357 posts
  • Location:FL
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 16 December 2010 - 09:55 PM

QUOTE (teamspears2010 @ Dec 16 2010, 02:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm interested in taking the Construction portion. For those that took the exam, can you provide some feedback into what books were more helpful than others?


3 questions or so were straight from the OSHA book, I think I used each of the other books on the ref. list about once to pull material from.

Mostly schedule and earthwork questions and things like that. There were a couple crane selection. maybe 1 on rigging
I'd say about 8-10 answers could be found in the ref. books.

I've been in Construction for 10 years and had to guess on a couple... but felt the majority of the questions were pretty clear and managable. I had a much harder time in the morning

#18 Callan74

Callan74

    Project Engineer

  • Senior Member
  • 51 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CO
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 19 December 2010 - 04:59 PM

QUOTE (teamspears2010 @ Dec 16 2010, 12:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm interested in taking the Construction portion. For those that took the exam, can you provide some feedback into what books were more helpful than others?



Besides the CERM...The book I used second most was All-in-One Civil PE Exam Guide by Indranil Goswami. Honestly this book was worth it's weight in gold. If I couldn't find a question in the CERM..found it in Goswami!!

Another great resource was the quick reference for the CERM...used this alot too...great place to include extra notes and formula's...

Top 3 ref I used for CM PE
1) CERM
2) CERM Quick reference
3) Goswami

#19 lotty

lotty

    Intern

  • Members
  • 12 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Washington
  • Discipline:Construction

Posted 07 January 2011 - 09:43 PM

1. Civil Engineering All-In-One PE Exam Guide: Breadth and Depth by Indranil Goswami (May 2009)
2. Civil PE Professional Engineer exam Construction module,Third Edition by Ruwan Rajapakse
3. CERM
4. Welders Pocket Guide
5. SmartPros Material(Bought the review class and printed out all of the material and had it bound)
6. 1926 OSHA Construction Industry Regulations
7. All of the recommended references from NCEES except the wood design book (wished I would have)
8. ACI SP-2


#20 costboy

costboy

    Intern

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 19 January 2011 - 06:30 PM

The short answer is I used (successfully) the following references for the October 2010 Civil/Construction exam:

(1) CERM
(2) PE Exam Construction Module, by Rajapakse
(3) NCEES sample Civil PE exams
(4) Lindeberg’s (PPI2Pass) sample Civil PE exams
(5) CFR1926 (Construction)
(6) MUTCD
(7) SP4 - Formwork for Concrete (includes ACI 347)
(8) ACI 347.2R-05

More detail on my usage and methodology here:
http://engineerboard...p...t&p=6865156


#21 jrf500

jrf500

    Project Engineer

  • Senior Member
  • 51 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:ND
  • Discipline:Construction

Posted 03 March 2011 - 04:38 PM

I'm going to bring up a topic here that's been hashed over in this thread, and others. But I'm struggling a bit to get a grasp on what people are saying. The opinions of test takers vary so much on this topic....I don't know what to do. I'm interested in what references should be brought to the PE exam for the CONSTRUCTION module. I've read this entire thread many times, along with the good thread on advice for CONSTRUCTION PE test under the "PE Exam Results" tab. Among many other threads.

Where I'm at a loss is the opinions vary so much on what to bring. A lot of people list a huge list of references including everything the NCEES lists among others. Some say they went in with the CERM, OSHA 1926 and a few solved problems and had no issues. Big difference of opinions! I know everyone is different and that's fine.

What I have now and have been studying from:

1) CERM
2) All-in-One Goswami book
3) Ruwan Rajapakse books (one with problems, and one regular book).
4) OSHA 1926
5) School of PE binder/notes
6) 6 Minute Soln's for Geo, Transpo, and Waters
7) Lindeburg Sample Exam & NCEES Sample Exam
8) MUTCD

I know I have more than enough material to cover the morning test, that's not my concern. I'm concerned if I have enough for the afternoon construction portion. I'm missing multiple ones off the NCEES list obviously. But a lot of that material is reprinted in the CERM or Ruwan books (Formwork pressure, etc). I have mixed feelings, I'm not being cheap...I'll gladly buy more references if I need. But I don't know if I'll get thru them in detail prior to the exam, so I don't see the benefit in lugging in multiple references that I'm unfamiliar with. On the other hand, if I need them to pass.....I will get them in a heartbeat.

I know opinions on this will vary and that's fine. I know it's also been hashed thru some already, but any insight would be much appreciated.

#22 Cristian

Cristian

    Intern

  • Members
  • 4 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 11 April 2011 - 10:59 PM

The references I used to study for my PE in April 2011 (Construction) were:

- CERM
- Goswami
- OSHA
- ASCE 37/02
- ACI 347 (forms)
- NCEES sample exams and 6 minute excercises
- MUTCD (just part 6)

I think that CERM alone would have not been sufficient, I am glad I reviewed both books. Goswami can be useful in combination with CERM as it presents equations in a simplified way. I checked all of the above references in great depth while I was studying, and it was certainly helpful.

Preparation:
I reviewed all exercises that are part of the original CERM book. I worked on the PPE 6 minute morning exercises (geo, structures, transpo and hydro) as well. I also solved the NCEES 2011, 2008, and 2001 sample exams. I also reviewed the Rajapakse book, but even tough I had it tagged, it was not very helpful as it does not have an index. However, solving some of the excercises on that book was helpful.

My advice is to focus on the material you can review. I had other references that I had not checked in detail and they were basically just weight in my bag. Also work on exercises as much as you can. I had Lindenburg Sample Examination and Practice Problems, but I had no time to do them. I think it would have been good if I would have checked them as well.

Now the waiting game has started, I hope I passed the test.

Edited by Cristian, 11 April 2011 - 11:04 PM.


#23 pryra

pryra

    Intern

  • Members
  • 7 posts
  • Discipline:Construction

Posted 19 April 2011 - 08:01 PM

QUOTE (Cristian @ Apr 11 2011, 06:59 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The references I used to study for my PE in April 2011 (Construction) were:

- CERM
- Goswami
- OSHA
- ASCE 37/02
- ACI 347 (forms)
- NCEES sample exams and 6 minute excercises
- MUTCD (just part 6)

I think that CERM alone would have not been sufficient, I am glad I reviewed both books. Goswami can be useful in combination with CERM as it presents equations in a simplified way. I checked all of the above references in great depth while I was studying, and it was certainly helpful.

Preparation:
I reviewed all exercises that are part of the original CERM book. I worked on the PPE 6 minute morning exercises (geo, structures, transpo and hydro) as well. I also solved the NCEES 2011, 2008, and 2001 sample exams. I also reviewed the Rajapakse book, but even tough I had it tagged, it was not very helpful as it does not have an index. However, solving some of the excercises on that book was helpful.

My advice is to focus on the material you can review. I had other references that I had not checked in detail and they were basically just weight in my bag. Also work on exercises as much as you can. I had Lindenburg Sample Examination and Practice Problems, but I had no time to do them. I think it would have been good if I would have checked them as well.

Now the waiting game has started, I hope I passed the test.




Hi Cristian,

Did you have a lot of problems of Surveying....I failed a couple of years ago and I recalled 3 or so problems in the Constr'n PM dealing with Surveying (ie. elevation, benchmarking, etc.)? Do you recall any good sources for the "Temporary Structures" as there were 5 questions in that area?

Thanks!


#24 Jayman_PE

Jayman_PE

    Quid pro quo

  • Senior Member
  • 271 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minnesota
  • Interests:Bicycling, running, outdoors.
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 02 October 2011 - 06:29 PM

Well, I'm getting an early start for the April 2012 Construction PE exam. Based on the great information others have shared on this site, I recently ordered, or dowloaded, all of the NCEES suggested reference material (incl. used AISC 13th edition for $18.76 at Bucks 4 Books & substitutde the ACI 318-05 with ACI 318-08 & commentary (found a great deal too good to pass up)). In addition I found

CERM 12th edition + morning breadth package
PPI Construction reference package,
Six Minute Solutions for Struct, Transpo, Water/Env., Geotch,
All-in-one Civil PE, Goswami
Wiley Dictionary of Civil Engineering and Construction
Bob's Crane and Rigging Handbook
Construction Methods and Management 7th edition
NCEES sample exam from 2004
Principals of Geotechnical Engineering (Das) 25th Anniv. Ed.


I would like to know where to find a really good clear and concise text for the exam on planning and scheduling with CPM and PMP methods? Any suggestions?


thanks,
Jason
MN

Edited by Jayman_10x, 02 October 2011 - 06:39 PM.


#25 csb

csb

    Veteran

  • Charter Member
  • 13,051 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:acquiring satelites...
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 04 October 2011 - 04:40 PM

I used a business textbook I owned, but I think all the info you need could be covered on a sheet of paper. I'd get comfortable solving those type of problems and make notes. The text would be overkill, I think.

Are you familiar with the concepts prior to this point?

#26 Dexman PE PMP

Dexman PE PMP

    Most Likely to be Arrested for PMP'n his PE-ness

  • Moderators
  • 18,152 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:A mile above the beach dwellers.
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 04 October 2011 - 05:28 PM

I would also suggest printing off and getting familiar with at least section 6 of the MUTCD. It's not for the planning/scheduling parts, but it is a helpful reference for traffic control.

Edited by Dexman PE, 04 October 2011 - 05:29 PM.


#27 Jayman_PE

Jayman_PE

    Quid pro quo

  • Senior Member
  • 271 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minnesota
  • Interests:Bicycling, running, outdoors.
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 06 October 2011 - 04:22 AM

Thanks guys. I forgot to list it but I did print out the MUTCD - part 6. Also, can anyone refer me to a solid text for the scheduling and CPM, PMP networks? I have never worked with them before, nor have I scheduled. Although I have set back schedules before bananapowerslide.gif

#28 giddyupmaster

giddyupmaster

    Noob

  • Members
  • 12 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Evansville, Indiana
  • Discipline:Construction

Posted 19 November 2011 - 01:31 PM

Here is a list of the references I used for the Civil PE Construction Depth. I used each book at LEAST once for my exam in October.

CERM
Design Loads on Structures During Construction (ASCE 37)
Formwork for Concrete (ACI SP-4)
Guide to Formwork for Concrete (ACI 347, this is included with ACI SP-4)
MUTCD Part 6
OSHA for the Construction Industry
National Design Specifications for Wood Construction

For ASCE 37, ACI SP-4 (and ACI 347), and the MUTCD Part 6, I was able to find PDF's to download on the internet. Some sites were fairly sketchy and I highly recommend a good antivirus before you go looking for files to download. I might be able to find where my pdf's came from if someone needs help.

Since I work for a state DOT as a construction engineer, I have contact with construction contractors on a daily basis. I simply asked one of their engineers if they had an extra OSHA manual lying around that I could borrow or rent from them.

I also bought the CERM for the Construction Depth (or something like that), it was just over $100 and was less than 200 pages long. Another engineer that I work with also bought this, we felt like largely it was a waste of money. Most material was just copied from the large CERM. Hopefully the next edition of the smaller book is better.

#29 treyjay

treyjay

    Professional Engineer

  • Senior Member
  • 74 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 19 November 2011 - 10:26 PM

Here is a list of the references I used for the Civil PE Construction Depth. I used each book at LEAST once for my exam in October.

CERM
Design Loads on Structures During Construction (ASCE 37)
Formwork for Concrete (ACI SP-4)
Guide to Formwork for Concrete (ACI 347, this is included with ACI SP-4)
MUTCD Part 6
OSHA for the Construction Industry
National Design Specifications for Wood Construction

For ASCE 37, ACI SP-4 (and ACI 347), and the MUTCD Part 6, I was able to find PDF's to download on the internet. Some sites were fairly sketchy and I highly recommend a good antivirus before you go looking for files to download. I might be able to find where my pdf's came from if someone needs help.

Since I work for a state DOT as a construction engineer, I have contact with construction contractors on a daily basis. I simply asked one of their engineers if they had an extra OSHA manual lying around that I could borrow or rent from them.

I also bought the CERM for the Construction Depth (or something like that), it was just over $100 and was less than 200 pages long. Another engineer that I work with also bought this, we felt like largely it was a waste of money. Most material was just copied from the large CERM. Hopefully the next edition of the smaller book is better.



I feel the same way about the Construction Depth Manual. I got the impression that it was rather hastily put together to meet a publication date goal. I think that with further editions this book will become a useful manual for the civil-construction exam. There are a few gems in the present edition, but right now, it is not worth the money.

#30 corainheaven

corainheaven

    Intern

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 21 November 2011 - 09:32 AM

Above reference is really helpful. In case you are interested in knowing how to make perfect road construction then you should select Asphalt Drum Mix Plant for making perfect construction and develop the infrastructure of the country.

#31 giddyupmaster

giddyupmaster

    Noob

  • Members
  • 12 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Evansville, Indiana
  • Discipline:Construction

Posted 23 November 2011 - 03:24 AM


Here is a list of the references I used for the Civil PE Construction Depth. I used each book at LEAST once for my exam in October.

CERM
Design Loads on Structures During Construction (ASCE 37)
Formwork for Concrete (ACI SP-4)
Guide to Formwork for Concrete (ACI 347, this is included with ACI SP-4)
MUTCD Part 6
OSHA for the Construction Industry
National Design Specifications for Wood Construction

For ASCE 37, ACI SP-4 (and ACI 347), and the MUTCD Part 6, I was able to find PDF's to download on the internet. Some sites were fairly sketchy and I highly recommend a good antivirus before you go looking for files to download. I might be able to find where my pdf's came from if someone needs help.

Since I work for a state DOT as a construction engineer, I have contact with construction contractors on a daily basis. I simply asked one of their engineers if they had an extra OSHA manual lying around that I could borrow or rent from them.

I also bought the CERM for the Construction Depth (or something like that), it was just over $100 and was less than 200 pages long. Another engineer that I work with also bought this, we felt like largely it was a waste of money. Most material was just copied from the large CERM. Hopefully the next edition of the smaller book is better.



I feel the same way about the Construction Depth Manual. I got the impression that it was rather hastily put together to meet a publication date goal. I think that with further editions this book will become a useful manual for the civil-construction exam. There are a few gems in the present edition, but right now, it is not worth the money.



I think you may be right about the publication date. I don't RECALL seeing it when I first ordered my materials (Early June), but saw it sometime in late September. I didn't want to buy it, but I wasn't going to miss out on passing the test because I was too cheap to pay another $130.

#32 Jayman_PE

Jayman_PE

    Quid pro quo

  • Senior Member
  • 271 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minnesota
  • Interests:Bicycling, running, outdoors.
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 23 November 2011 - 06:48 PM

It would be nice if a 6 minute solutions for Construction came out. Of course, there is a lot of overlap in Geotech, Structures and Transpo.....

#33 TRu40

TRu40

    Intern

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 15 December 2011 - 07:05 PM

Has anyone used and had success with Construction Depth Reference Manual for the Civil PE Exam by Thomas Korman PhD PE PLS (Aug 28, 2011)? I am wondering if it is worth the buy.

#34 ptatohed

ptatohed

    Chief Engineer

  • Supporting Member
  • 1,644 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Murrieta, CA
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 31 January 2012 - 05:28 PM

It would be nice if a 6 minute solutions for Construction came out. Of course, there is a lot of overlap in Geotech, Structures and Transpo.....



They do now. :) http://ppi2pass.com/...lems-sxccn.html

#35 treyjay

treyjay

    Professional Engineer

  • Senior Member
  • 74 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 16 February 2012 - 02:23 AM

Here is what I used for success on Const Depth in no particular order:

1. CERM
2. NCEES Sample problems (Construction)
3. Nunnally "Construction Methods & Management"
4. Mamlouk "Materials for Civil & Construction Engineers"
5. CERM Const. Depth Manual
6. Ruwan Books
7. School of PE Construction Notes (AM & PM)
8. All NCEES listed Const. Design Standards (you need all of them)


Don't think you can pass on some of the Design Standards...you need them & you need to know them. I used 6 of the 9 directly on the exam and would have missed points if I did not have them. My guess is that the ones I did not use could easily be of need on the next exam. Know how to use the OSHA Manual for engineering types of questions.

As far as CERM Const. Depth Manual goes, it really is not a "stand alone" reference, has no practice problems, and is really of no help without other references...but it does have some gems. Maybe future editions will be better.

Const. 6 Minute Solutions was not available so I don't know how it compares, but my guess is that any source of construction engineering problems to work is going to be very beneficial.

Don't waste time with reading construction administration stuff....it will be of little use.

NCEES Sample Problems will give you the best idea of what you are up against.

#36 sledgeconcrete

sledgeconcrete

    Continuing Education Fan

  • Supporting Member
  • 26 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Missouri
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 16 April 2012 - 09:01 PM

1. NCEES Sample Problems...it lists the references they used to solve the problems. I took several of the "textbooks" that used in the solutions and I ended up using those books more than the CERM only because I was familliar with them. Several of the reference textbooks I used in graduate school. If you are not familiar with them they won't help.

2. CERM

3. ACI Formwork book with ACI 347-04...used this one a lot on the April 2012 exam.

4. AASHTO Green Book - tables are faster than calculations in my opinion

5. OSHA 1926 Several questions on each exam about OSHA. If you have taken an OSHA 10/30/40 hour class take the other reference materials as well.

6. MUTC good for a few answers...if you bring it.

7. Peurifoy et al, Construction Planning, Equipment, and Methods. I wish I had the estimating textbook, but I didn't.

8. Nunnally Construction Methods and Management

9. AISC Steel Manual - weld symbols, Moment of Inertia

10. Any text book by Ven Te Chow - Hydrology, Open Chanel Hydraulics

11. Das - Foundation Engineering, Geotechnical Engineering

12. PCA Design and Control of Concrete Mixtures

13. My Hibbler Structural Engineering textbook because I knew where all the shear and moment diagrams were

I do not think that the NDS timber design guides are needed. That would be 4 books to study for very few problems

A civil engineering dictionary might be beneficial for some of the definition type questions...I don't have one, but I wish I would have

Don't use books that you aren't familiar with because you will burn time. However if there are a few questions that you guess on and will come back to and you have plenty of time, you may want to dig through some of your extra books to find an answer. Make sure you answer every question as you get to it even if you have to guess. You don't want to hear "5 minutes left" and realize that your answers are off a line because you skipped a question.

#37 Jayman_PE

Jayman_PE

    Quid pro quo

  • Senior Member
  • 271 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minnesota
  • Interests:Bicycling, running, outdoors.
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 17 April 2012 - 10:11 PM

Make sure you answer every question as you get to it even if you have to guess. You don't want to hear "5 minutes left" and realize that your answers are off a line because you skipped a question.


Sledge,

I agree with almost everything you said, except your last point. My strategy was to read each question in order. If I knew how to do it I did. If not and/or it appeared to take a lot of time I skipped it and circled the question number on my answer sheet. This prevented me from mistakingly bubling answers for a different question. It worked great. Guessing along the way might evoke a false sense of confidence and one forgets to circle back to them later. Just my 2 cents.


Jason

#38 Lucky1

Lucky1

    Project Engineer

  • Senior Member
  • 51 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Afghanistan
  • Discipline:Construction

Posted 07 June 2012 - 08:45 AM

Is the book by Puerifoy, "Estimating Construction Costs" useful? I haven't seen any recommendations on this or other good estimating books to use as references.

#39 Jayman_PE

Jayman_PE

    Quid pro quo

  • Senior Member
  • 271 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minnesota
  • Interests:Bicycling, running, outdoors.
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 07 June 2012 - 01:26 PM

Very useful. Use this for production calculations and pump problems. Also, Peurifoy's explanation on bank volume calcs/water requirements/bank density vs. loose density is the best I've ever seen. Clear and concise. It can be useful for AM problems as well. Absolutely get this book.

#40 Lucky1

Lucky1

    Project Engineer

  • Senior Member
  • 51 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Afghanistan
  • Discipline:Construction

Posted 07 June 2012 - 03:07 PM

Thanks for the tip on the estimating book. Any recommendations for good scheduling books that have the same format as NCEES problems?

#41 civilshah

civilshah

    Intern

  • Members
  • 27 posts
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 28 July 2012 - 08:59 PM

I have some Civil Construction Depth References for Sale which I used extensively for my exam preparation and during the exam. Check out the EB link

http://engineerboard...showtopic=19782

#42 passthecivilPE

passthecivilPE

    Intern

  • Members
  • 6 posts
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 29 August 2012 - 12:47 AM

All:

Grab any and all practice problems and use the above references while you study, especially the NCEES Practice Exams. Write your solutions down clearly and concisely, and mark where you found the reference information – you will be able to use these solutions during the exam if you put them into an organized binder and tab them so you can quickly reference your material. Organize your reference material around you during your study sessions similar to how you will have it during the exam (i.e., books on the floor in your bag and a couple books on the table in front of you, or in your box crates, etc.).

Best of luck,
passthecivilPE

www.passthecivilPE.com - Special Discount NOW on the new passthecivilPE Guide Book

#43 S28

S28

    Intern

  • Supporting Member
  • 37 posts
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 30 January 2013 - 06:56 PM

Has anyone purchased passpe.com's Construction PE Depth Review Module by Dr. Shahin Mansour? I found it while using Google... just wondering if anyone has used it and likes it or if it isn't worth the money...?

 

Link to the module is listed below... 

 

http://035a5f2.netso...topics-1-1.aspx



#44 anxiouspetaker

anxiouspetaker

    Intern

  • Senior Member
  • 37 posts
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 31 January 2013 - 01:39 PM

Has anyone purchased passpe.com's Construction PE Depth Review Module by Dr. Shahin Mansour? I found it while using Google... just wondering if anyone has used it and likes it or if it isn't worth the money...?

 

Link to the module is listed below... 

 

http://035a5f2.netso...topics-1-1.aspx

 

Unfortunately I bout it about a week before the test and I wished I'd had it all along!!!  I would saved myself ALOT of money!!!  I found this book to be one of the most useful and helpful ... it goes over all the construction AM & PM topics with beautifully typed up notes and awesome problems ... I HIGHLY recommend getting both the AM & PM constuction reference book and the practice problems ... i didn't get the CDs so I don't know about those but the books were about $130+shipping ... best 130 you could spend for construction, imo ... very comprehensive too!!!


  • S28 likes this

#45 ENGINEER IV

ENGINEER IV

    Intern

  • EB.com member
  • 11 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 05 June 2013 - 04:45 AM

My reply would be late but for the sake of people who will take the future Construction Module, I will recommend the Construction Module book of Dr. Shahin Mansour.  I used it, I passed.  Try solving other problems from other books/references and use Mansour's reference to fully familiarize yourself.  The book of Rjapanske (???) is a joke !



#46 ahill84

ahill84

    Intern

  • Members
  • 3 posts
  • Discipline:Civil

Posted 08 November 2013 - 12:43 AM

Currently building references to study for April 2014 exam, but have a few questions I thought someone might be able to help answer!

 

1.  For NDS Wood Design, 2005 or 2012?  NCEES website says 2005 but seems like it would have been updated by now?

2.  Steel Construction Manual, 13th or 14th edition?  I have the 13th edition from undergrad, tabbed, and noted.  Also NCEES says 13th edition, but I read that some people get the 14th edition.  Any thoughts on the differences that might affect an exam taker?

3.  ACI 318-08.  I currently have ACI 318M-08 from my undergrad, tabbed and noted.  I think the M just means "metric".  Is this going to be a huge issue or can I just convert?

4.  OSHA 29CFR 1926.  I see a 2008 and 2012 version on Amazon, any thoughts not the differences?

 

I've been skimming the forums and see some good stuff on other references, but was quite worried about all these "version" questions based on the NCEES reference list.

 

Thanks for any help!!

 

Andrew



#47 desantmf

desantmf

    Professional Engineer

  • Supporting Member
  • 101 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Discipline:Construction

Posted 12 November 2013 - 04:17 AM

Andrew, in general I usually suggest just buying what the ncees website tells you to. You probably won't get anything wrong, but there may be one question. If i were you this is what i would do,

1. get the 2012 NDS version, you will probably only use this book one or twice and a newer version he better, also ncees wil probably update to this version soon, so for resale value this is better.
2. keep The steel manual you have- 13th.
3. Get the ACI 318-08, and not the metric. It won't be a huge issue but might make your life a little easier during he test.
4. Get the OSHA version 2012 just make sure it is 29CFR1926.

Let me know if you have any other questions,

Mark



Reply to this topic



  


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

=