Jump to content


Photo

lally columns


5 replies to this topic

#1 wimp

wimp

    Intern

  • Members
  • 25 posts
  • Location:Rhode Island

Posted 12 July 2007 - 04:21 PM

Any structural engineers out there know anything about Lally columns. I have a house to renovate / design and am relizing that builders use lally columns without realizing how much load they are putting on them. Are there any load tables out there for Lally columns which are purchased at local lumber yards?
One site said the allowable load for a 3.5" dia 16 ga. column is 8.2Kips
are these columns really only 16 ga?? that's only approx .06" wall thickness!!
seems really low considering these columns are widely used in most residential construction.

any guidance would b e appreciated.

#2 rdbse

rdbse

    Research Fellow

  • Senior Member
  • 109 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nashville, TN
  • Discipline:Structural

Posted 12 July 2007 - 05:10 PM

I do not have a table for lally columns, but a 3-1/2" 16 Ga. stud 12'-0" long is good for about 3 kips. The circular section of the column will have better section properties resulting in a greater capacity.

Regardless, I would use standard pipe columns, and that's why I do not like doing residential work.

#3 wimp

wimp

    Intern

  • Members
  • 25 posts
  • Location:Rhode Island

Posted 12 July 2007 - 05:18 PM

QUOTE (rdbse @ Jul 12 2007, 01:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I do not have a table for lally columns, but a 3-1/2" 16 Ga. stud 12'-0" long is good for about 3 kips. The circular section of the column will have better section properties resulting in a greater capacity.

Regardless, I would use standard pipe columns, and that's why I do not like doing residential work.


I agree, when I do new work, I use HSS square tubes, but this one is existing. I think I will have them replace them since we will be adding significant load to them.

thanks for the input

thankyou.gif

#4 singlespeed

singlespeed

    Tormented

  • EB Supporting Member
  • 380 posts
  • Location:Newnan
  • Discipline:Electrical

Posted 12 July 2007 - 07:33 PM

When you see the load ratings, be sure to note what assumptions were made - some tables that I have seen state eccentricity of load, yield strength of steel, and compressive strength of concrete used to fill the steel post.

#5 MA_PE

MA_PE

    engine near

  • EB Supporting Member
  • 11,802 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:MA
  • Discipline:Structural

Posted 12 July 2007 - 08:36 PM

A quick search got me this link.

post jacks

As stated above, note that allowable loads assume concentric loading with a safety factor of 2.5. These guys a 11 ga

#6 snake340

snake340

    Intern

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • Discipline:Structural

Posted 26 September 2011 - 01:25 PM

Check this link for load tables

http://www.destefano...lly_columns.pdf

The same laod table is usually available on Lally's website (http://www.lallycorp.com/index.html), but the site seems to be down right now.

You can't compare a Lally column to a 16 ga. stud because Lally columns are filled with concrete, which gives them almost all of their axial strength.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

=