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summit550

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Still waiting to hear on my results. Was curious what those who have found out they've passed have gotten as a response from their employers. Wondering if they're using the economy as an excuse not to compensate you better even though you got your PE.

Lets hear it.............

 

Phalanx

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Still waiting to hear on my results. Was curious what those who have found out they've passed have gotten as a response from their employers. Wondering if they're using the economy as an excuse not to compensate you better even though you got your PE.Lets hear it.............
Well I was laid off on April 2nd, so I won't be getting a raise from unemployment. On the other hand, three of my buddies have received their pass results. Here is what their gracious employers offered:

One guy in Wisconsin received a $1/hr raise.

One guy in Washington received a $0.50/hr raise and a $500 bonus.

The last guy from Montana was taken out for beer and wings but did not receive a raise.

That being said, all of them are looking for new jobs. It's not that they are suddenly smarter because they are a PE, but they all feel that they are worth more.

 

WoodSlinger

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Still waiting to hear on my results. Was curious what those who have found out they've passed have gotten as a response from their employers. Wondering if they're using the economy as an excuse not to compensate you better even though you got your PE.Lets hear it.............

That is always the question that is asked when one gets licensed, "Are you worth more today than you were yesterday". In my mind, if your duties do not change at work because you become licensed, no compensation is required. When I passed my exam a number of years ago, I didn't receive a bonus or an increase, but my responsibilites didn't change either. I feel the only time a wage increase is appropriate is if you are promoted because of the PE. Otherwise, it's really just a couple of letters you get to put behind you name.

That being said, it does make looking for employment elsewhere easier, and could possibly help in getting a little extra bump in pay. Probably not in this economy though.

 

asunw

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I don't think you're automatically worth you but if you are required to stamp your own plans whether or not your responsibilities have changed. I think you deserve a raise.

 
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D

Dexman PE

Still waiting to hear on my results. Was curious what those who have found out they've passed have gotten as a response from their employers. Wondering if they're using the economy as an excuse not to compensate you better even though you got your PE.Lets hear it.............

That is always the question that is asked when one gets licensed, "Are you worth more today than you were yesterday". In my mind, if your duties do not change at work because you become licensed, no compensation is required. When I passed my exam a number of years ago, I didn't receive a bonus or an increase, but my responsibilites didn't change either. I feel the only time a wage increase is appropriate is if you are promoted because of the PE. Otherwise, it's really just a couple of letters you get to put behind you name.

That being said, it does make looking for employment elsewhere easier, and could possibly help in getting a little extra bump in pay. Probably not in this economy though.
This is why alot of engineers end up looking for a new job after getting the PE. With the PE you can then market yourself as available to take on more responsibilities, which will then lend the new company the ability to pay you more.

I talked about this in a similar thread: "Fatty raises". It's all about what you bring to the table for your employer. If you have always been a CAD tech and will continue to be a CAD tech after getting a PE, yes the PE is just 2 more letters and not worth anything to the company. In fact, you actually become more of a liability for the company because they have to update their liability insurance to include your registration and your ability to stamp drawings.

But for me, getting the PE opened the opportunity for me to attend corporate PM training which allowed me to manage several projects on my own and take on more responsibility (including the possibility of stamping drawings). I ended up getting a ~10% raise while I watched a co-worker not get a thing because he didn't want to be a project manager.

 

TBSS

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I don't think you're automatically worth you but if you are required to stamp your own plans whether or not your responsibilities have changed. I think you deserve a raise.
I agree. If you are required to stamp your own designs as well as the designs of everyone else in your department, you deserve a decent pay raise even if your day to day responsibilites have not changed. I know the company has professional liability insurance but if something bad happens, your license is on the line. However, if you still do the same designs and the boss continues to stamp them then I don't really see how you would deserve a pay raise because you haven't increased your value to the company just by possessing the license. Just my $.02.

 

BenM

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I just found out yesterday that I passed the PE, and I'll be getting a ~ $10k raise as a result.

I've been 'acting' in a supervisory role for the last year that I can now officially assume since the PE was the last requirement of getting the official job title, hence the raise. Either way I'm happy about it!

FWIW I will be stamping plans, it's about the only thing I haven't been doing in my 'acting' role....

 
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Qwistin

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This has never made sense to me. Even if your job responsibilities don't change, they should consider paying to keep you. Apparently, I do the job of a PE, but my stuff is 'checked' by a PE since I'm still an EIT. If they don't pay me for my new credentials (which the firm is able to market my being a PE) then I will go elsewhere. They will have lost what they invested in me, training wise, and experience gain wise. It behooves them to increase my pay.

"Are you worth more today than you were yesterday" is a question that they expect you to answer with "no". You should answer "yes". A PE IS worth more. The question I was once posed was "do you know any more today than you did yesterday". The answer for that one is "yes, to use my PE to get a better job somewhere else."

How these questions encourage young engineers to get licensed is beyond me. *grumble grumble*

 

summit550

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This has never made sense to me. Even if your job responsibilities don't change, they should consider paying to keep you. Apparently, I do the job of a PE, but my stuff is 'checked' by a PE since I'm still an EIT. If they don't pay me for my new credentials (which the firm is able to market my being a PE) then I will go elsewhere. They will have lost what they invested in me, training wise, and experience gain wise. It behooves them to increase my pay.
"Are you worth more today than you were yesterday" is a question that they expect you to answer with "no". You should answer "yes". A PE IS worth more. The question I was once posed was "do you know any more today than you did yesterday". The answer for that one is "yes, to use my PE to get a better job somewhere else."

How these questions encourage young engineers to get licensed is beyond me. *grumble grumble*
I agree with you on this one...but I also see others points as well.

I expect a giant pay increase not because I'm a new person but because the way our contracts with clients are written they pay much more for a PE than an EIT regardless of how long I've been one. No way in F'ing hell I'm going to let them bill me out at 30% more and pocket the extra cash especially with how our rate structure works., ie they make more money the more they pay me (multiplier).

 
D

Dexman PE

This has never made sense to me. Even if your job responsibilities don't change, they should consider paying to keep you. Apparently, I do the job of a PE, but my stuff is 'checked' by a PE since I'm still an EIT. If they don't pay me for my new credentials (which the firm is able to market my being a PE) then I will go elsewhere. They will have lost what they invested in me, training wise, and experience gain wise. It behooves them to increase my pay.
"Are you worth more today than you were yesterday" is a question that they expect you to answer with "no". You should answer "yes". A PE IS worth more. The question I was once posed was "do you know any more today than you did yesterday". The answer for that one is "yes, to use my PE to get a better job somewhere else."

How these questions encourage young engineers to get licensed is beyond me. *grumble grumble*
I agree with you on this one...but I also see others points as well.

I expect a giant pay increase not because I'm a new person but because the way our contracts with clients are written they pay much more for a PE than an EIT regardless of how long I've been one. No way in F'ing hell I'm going to let them bill me out at 30% more and pocket the extra cash especially with how our rate structure works., ie they make more money the more they pay me (multiplier).
Be careful with how you're billing out. The big project I was working on at the time had me locked in at the EIT rates through the end of the project despite the fact that I got my PE 1/2 way through. The company was not billing me out at a higher rate and my duties for the project did not change, so they didn't give me an immediate raise. I didn't get the raise until after this project was complete because only then was I actually doing more and was able to be billed at a higher rate.

 

summit550

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This has never made sense to me. Even if your job responsibilities don't change, they should consider paying to keep you. Apparently, I do the job of a PE, but my stuff is 'checked' by a PE since I'm still an EIT. If they don't pay me for my new credentials (which the firm is able to market my being a PE) then I will go elsewhere. They will have lost what they invested in me, training wise, and experience gain wise. It behooves them to increase my pay.
"Are you worth more today than you were yesterday" is a question that they expect you to answer with "no". You should answer "yes". A PE IS worth more. The question I was once posed was "do you know any more today than you did yesterday". The answer for that one is "yes, to use my PE to get a better job somewhere else."

How these questions encourage young engineers to get licensed is beyond me. *grumble grumble*
I agree with you on this one...but I also see others points as well.

I expect a giant pay increase not because I'm a new person but because the way our contracts with clients are written they pay much more for a PE than an EIT regardless of how long I've been one. No way in F'ing hell I'm going to let them bill me out at 30% more and pocket the extra cash especially with how our rate structure works., ie they make more money the more they pay me (multiplier).
Be careful with how you're billing out. The big project I was working on at the time had me locked in at the EIT rates through the end of the project despite the fact that I got my PE 1/2 way through. The company was not billing me out at a higher rate and my duties for the project did not change, so they didn't give me an immediate raise. I didn't get the raise until after this project was complete because only then was I actually doing more and was able to be billed at a higher rate.
Point taken. That's not how our contracts are written however, they are long term contracts 5-years which allow for promotions and basically flat rates for types of workers and we just bill hours. I've taken on a ton more responsibilities than other EITs but can't get the raise until I get the PE.

 

MA_PE

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That is always the question that is asked when one gets licensed, "Are you worth more today than you were yesterday". In my mind, if your duties do not change at work because you become licensed, no compensation is required. When I passed my exam a number of years ago, I didn't receive a bonus or an increase, but my responsibilites didn't change either. I feel the only time a wage increase is appropriate is if you are promoted because of the PE. Otherwise, it's really just a couple of letters you get to put behind you name.
I talked about this in a similar thread: "Fatty raises". It's all about what you bring to the table for your employer. If you have always been a CAD tech and will continue to be a CAD tech after getting a PE, yes the PE is just 2 more letters and not worth anything to the company. In fact, you actually become more of a liability for the company because they have to update their liability insurance to include your registration and your ability to stamp drawings.
You guys are oversimplifying here. In the consultant game, credentials are quite important. The addition of a credential, especially an engineering registration for an engineering firm, DOES improve your worth to the company even if you never stamp anything.

It's worth something for the company to say "we have XX enginerrs in our emply and XX% are registered as professional engineers." The hiogher the ratio the better/more qulified the company looks.

At our company, policy is a $1/hr automatic raise when you pass the PE.

 
D

Dexman PE

You also have to consider the discipline, position, and/or industry you work in. For example, my last employer actually discouraged the engineers from getting PE's because the company didn't need them. There was no value to the company for you to have a PE. Additionally, a consultant's career lives and dies with his PE, whereas many construction, government, and utility positions don't need them.

Although you can make the argument that you are worth more because you have a PE, you have to remember that value is subjective. You, personally, may be worth more with the PE, but if you're employer doesn't want/need you to be a PE (or have any corporate gain from you having your license), your license is essentially "worthless" in that regard. You can then gain value with it by applying/transferring to a new/different position (either new company, or new position within the same company) where this value can be recognized.

I know several EE's and a couple ME's who have their license but have it purely because they wanted it. They never got a raise, nor expected one, because the areas they work in don't need the licensure. To them, the license is priceless. To their employer, it's worthless.

 
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wilheldp_PE

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If you are in an exempt industry (i.e. your PE holds no weight within your company or with its customers), then becoming licensed does not increase your value to the company. Any increase in pay is just a bonus to congratulate you for an accomplishment...it should not be expected.

If you work in consulting, or any other industry where a PE is vital to the execution of your work, then you should expect a raise. Why? Because your employer WILL charge customers more for your time. For instance, at my company, an EIT is billed at $100/hr, but a PE (regular engineer) is billed at $125/hr. (with senior engineers billed at $135/hr). If your company is able to charge 25% more for the services you provide to their customers, then you should be entitled to more compensation.

There is/was a lot of big talk from rppearso/ironman and Bean about simply not providing services for your company unless your compensation is raised commensurate with your credentials, but it doesn't work that way. If you don't get the raise when you pass, you should just start looking for employment elsewhere. The job market still sucks, but having those little letters after your name make you infinitely more marketable in certain industries. If you like your current company, get an offer from somewhere else, and use that offer as leverage to ask for a raise. If they still won't budge, at least you have a backup plan.

 

Bean PE

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There is/was a lot of big talk from rppearso/ironman and Bean about simply not providing services for your company unless your compensation is raised commensurate with your credentials,
I think my comments may have been misunderstood. My specific comment was about not providing additional services when faced with decreasing compensation while improving your credentials. I'm already providing additional services with reduced pay and benefits; I'll have a problem if compensation is again reduced, particularly if I'm able to put a couple letters after my name.

While I have common ground with rppearso, it's tempered with a hefty dose of reality; there are just certain points where I won't compromise further. Everyone has such a point, I just happen to know where exactly it is.

 
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wilheldp_PE

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I think my comments may have been misunderstood. My specific comment was about not providing additional services when faced with decreasing compensation while improving your credentials. I'm already providing additional services with reduced pay and benefits; I'll have a problem if compensation is again reduced, particularly if I'm able to put a couple letters after my name.
That's all fine and good, but you are still an at-will employee. If you decide to not do what the company expects of you, they are perfectly happy to fire your ass (unemployment is a lot cheaper than paying even your reduced salary).

 

Bean PE

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That's all fine and good, but you are still an at-will employee. If you decide to not do what the company expects of you, they are perfectly happy to fire your ass (unemployment is a lot cheaper than paying even your reduced salary).
I'm aware of that. And since I'm young, unmarried, and have no kids, I'm in a financial position to be a little less conservative about the issue.

 

pelaw

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I'd say, immediate 5-6k annual raise is in order. About $100 per week.

 

SE Taker

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Several years ago when I passed the PE, I got a couple of dollars per hour raise but the economy was much better then. I did get a promotion to go along with the raise. When I pass the SE, I am hoping for some kind of raise.

 
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