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PE - Taking Exam Before Gaining Experience

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John_Cena

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Hello everyone,

I'm looking to take the PE exam before gaining the 4 years of experience. I have a M.Sc. degree in civil engineering as well.

I'm looking at Nevada, seems they accept M.Sc. as 2 years of work experience and they told me they accept early examination as well. My question is;

Is there anyone who has taken PE exam early like me in either Nevada, Wyoming, etc?

Have you had any problem later when transferring your license from a state which allows early examination (ex. Nevada) to the ones that don't (ex. Colorado) even after obtaining your 4-years of experience?

Really appreciate your feedback!!! Thanks!

 

Ruth_W

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Hello everyone,

I'm looking to take the PE exam before gaining the 4 years of experience. I have a M.Sc. degree in civil engineering as well.

I'm looking at Nevada, seems they accept M.Sc. as 2 years of work experience and they told me they accept early examination as well. My question is;

Is there anyone who has taken PE exam early like me in either Nevada, Wyoming, etc?

Have you had any problem later when transferring your license from a state which allows early examination (ex. Nevada) to the ones that don't (ex. Colorado) even after obtaining your 4-years of experience?

Really appreciate your feedback!!! Thanks!
I live in California, which seems to have similar rules as Nevada, and I took the PE exam last year while I was still completing my masters degree. In fact, in CA I will qualify for the full license after just 1 year of work experience due to having a masters. However (and someone is free to correct me on this), I believe I am not allowed to transfer my license to other states that mandate 4 years for everyone regardless of education level until I have reached the 4 year mark myself. 

 

MadamPirate PE

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Is there anyone who has taken PE exam early like me in either Nevada, Wyoming, etc?
I have a buddy who took it in Wyoming, as an early examination. They didn't award him his license until he completed his 4 years of experience. So he passed at 3 years, but he didn't get his license until he submitted the paperwork proving he had four years of experience. At that point, he's able to apply for comity elsewhere. 

 

5 to 9

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I’m just surprised that John Cena has time in his busy schedule to become a licensed professional engineer. Is there even anything that John Cena cannot do??

 

RBHeadge PE

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Hello everyone,

I'm looking to take the PE exam before gaining the 4 years of experience. I have a M.Sc. degree in civil engineering as well.

I'm looking at Nevada, seems they accept M.Sc. as 2 years of work experience and they told me they accept early examination as well. My question is;

Is there anyone who has taken PE exam early like me in either Nevada, Wyoming, etc?

Have you had any problem later when transferring your license from a state which allows early examination (ex. Nevada) to the ones that don't (ex. Colorado) even after obtaining your 4-years of experience?

Really appreciate your feedback!!! Thanks!
It depends on the state, and it can cause issues later for some states. I'm too lazy to type the same advice twice in one week, so look at this thread instead:




 

TrickShotG

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Another relevant thread on this topic  below. A fellow user has experience that suggests Ohio is another state that will not grant a license via comity to those who pass the exam prior to receiving the required experience.






 

TrickShotG

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I’m just surprised that John Cena has time in his busy schedule to become a licensed professional engineer. Is there even anything that John Cena cannot do??
"You can't see me"

1443718534_you cant see me.gif

 

WingNut

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this is a question that requires some thought.  Because you don't know what the future holds, it may be more efficient to take the exam AFTER the 4 years of experience as opposed to before.  WHY?  States that mandate the 4 years of experience before taking the exam will NOT give you comity because the way that you earned your initial license was NOT EXACTLY the way that the jurisdiction requires it to be done.

As enticing as it is to take the examination early, be prepared to possibly have to retake the PE exam in another jurisdiction if you have to move and are required to be licensed in a different jurisdiction other than that which you earned your initial license.  I know, you are never going to leave where you are now!!  Well, don't totally believe that-- you may and have to sit for the exam at 45 or 55 years old-- that sucks-- I know, I had to do it.  Yes, I passed with flying colors, so said the lady at the board, but I was just as stressed as the new engineer taking the exam for the first time.  Yes, I had 40 years of experience as well, but remember, it is an EXAM!!

 

CAPLS

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In addition to the other advice already given to you above, consider for a moment that while certainly given with the utmost sincerity and intent to provide sound advice, that advice is provided based on their own unique experiences, from the time when they experienced them.

Boards do change their positions on things; laws do change; requirements can be different than what others have experienced.  You're best bet is to do whatever you need to do to 1) passed the FE (if you haven't already) and PE exam (which match the discipline of engineering corresponding with your expertise/experience); 2) obtain that initial license; and then, 3) determine where else you MIGHT end up and inquire with that specific licensing board in that state.  No one will have a better answer than the board in the state for which you are interested in.

You'll easily clear 1-2 years initially just taking of the exams and first PE.  Get that initial PE license first and yes, there may be some delay later on, but I KNOW that the states mentioned have had to reassess their original positions (that others have told you) and in some cases, things have changed.

 

RBHeadge PE

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You'll easily clear 1-2 years initially just taking of the exams and first PE.  Get that initial PE license first and yes, there may be some delay later on, but I KNOW that the states mentioned have had to reassess their original positions (that others have told you) and in some cases, things have changed.
Would you know if Pennsylvania has changed or relaxed their interpretation of the law? It'd be nice if they finally did. They still have the same bold, underlined, and red language on their webpage about the experience requirement.

 

CAPLS

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Would you know if Pennsylvania has changed or relaxed their interpretation of the law? It'd be nice if they finally did. They still have the same bold, underlined, and red language on their webpage about the experience requirement.
Do you mean this:

EIT Certificate Reminder:
In accordance with section 4.2 of Engineer Land Surveyor and Geologist Registration Law, 63 P.S. § 151.2, an applicant cannot begin accruing four or more years of progressive experience to qualify for the principles and practice of engineering examination until AFTER the engineer-in training certificate (EIT) is issued.
I found that on the PA Engineers Board homepage.  If so, then I read this as:  Once you qualify for the EIT, including passing the FE exam, you need to obtain your EIT certificate to begin accruing your required four years of engineering experience to meet the qualifications for obtaining the PE license.

I didn't see anything related to when you can sit for the subsequent PE exam vs when work experience can begin to be accepted towards PE licensure, but maybe I just missed that.  

On another, somewhat related note, immediately following the above paragraph is:

It is the responsibility of the applicant to apply for the EIT. Applicants must show satisfactory evidence of graduation from an approved engineering curriculum of four or more years or eight years of progressive experience approximating the education obtained through an approved engineering curriculum, to obtain the EIT. The date of issuance of the EIT will be the date the completed EIT application – including proof of graduation when applicable – is processed.

(Underlined text above is from me)  Reading these two paragraphs together would make me question...How can I obtain eight years of progressive experience to obtain the EIT, when you just told me that years of experience cannot accrue until AFTER I obtain my EIT????

That's a circular requirement.  I do know that PA is one of those states that has had difficulty adjusting policies/laws to be consistent with what the rest of the states are doing.  Doesn't mean they may not be trying...

EDIT:

Look at third paragraph at this link https://www.dos.pa.gov/ProfessionalLicensing/BoardsCommissions/EngineersLandSurveyorsandGeologists/Pages/Engineer-Guide.aspx under heading Professional Engineer License By Examination.

That language leads me to believe that once you've obtained your EIT certificate, you can accrue experience and pass the PE exam.

 
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Do you mean this:

EIT Certificate Reminder:
In accordance with section 4.2 of Engineer Land Surveyor and Geologist Registration Law, 63 P.S. § 151.2, an applicant cannot begin accruing four or more years of progressive experience to qualify for the principles and practice of engineering examination until AFTER the engineer-in training certificate (EIT) is issued.
I found that on the PA Engineers Board homepage.  If so, then I read this as:  Once you qualify for the EIT, including passing the FE exam, you need to obtain your EIT certificate to begin accruing your required four years of engineering experience to meet the qualifications for obtaining the PE license.

I didn't see anything related to when you can sit for the subsequent PE exam vs when work experience can begin to be accepted towards PE licensure, but maybe I just missed that.  
Of course, since each state has its own laws and rules for licensure, there can be exceptions.  Some states don't issue EIT certificates (e.g. Michigan).  I had no problem obtaining licensure in Pennsylvania despite not having an EIT certificate.  Then again, I already held PE licenses in several states.  

As always, questions for specific circumstances should always be directed to the particular state Board.  Most of them are quite helpful.  

 

Fire_PE

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I am recently licensed in my home state, having gone back to take the exams after 20 years experience. I applied for Comity in PA. PA told me I have to wait for four years to arbitrarily elapse, since I took my FE and PE exams back to back just last year. They sent information that says they only count experience post FE exam, during EIT period. It seems my prior 2 decades of experience are irrelevant because I didn't pass the FE exam.

I'm still trying to find out, based on their firm interpretation of their rule, if I have to apply for EIT in PA while being a practicing Engineer in several other states. If so, can I be my own supervisor? How does that work.

I can not believe this is accurate, and really hope it's a misunderstanding. I can't believe this process is that crazy. It sounds really silly.
 

CAPLS

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I am recently licensed in my home state, having gone back to take the exams after 20 years experience. I applied for Comity in PA. PA told me I have to wait for four years to arbitrarily elapse, since I took my FE and PE exams back to back just last year. They sent information that says they only count experience post FE exam, during EIT period. It seems my prior 2 decades of experience are irrelevant because I didn't pass the FE exam.

I'm still trying to find out, based on their firm interpretation of their rule, if I have to apply for EIT in PA while being a practicing Engineer in several other states. If so, can I be my own supervisor? How does that work.

I can not believe this is accurate, and really hope it's a misunderstanding. I can't believe this process is that crazy. It sounds really silly.
Yes, if what you say is accurate, that is crazy and not the thinking in MANY other state licensing boards. I can't speak for PA Board, but that may be a reflection of hardcore adherence to laws rather than a full understanding of board authority. Of course, there may be oversight agencies which strictly enforce the Board's adherence so I would advise you to appeal to the Board in a professional manner. Couldn't hurt.
 

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