Paths to FE/EIT/PE from MS Degree

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AstroStudent

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Hi all,

I've done quite a bit of Googling on this topic and wasn't able to find a satisfactory answer.

I am working on finishing my BSMS with the BS being in physics and MS in EE. As it stands, I don't think I'll be allowed to sit for the FE with my current credentials -- the engineering grad program is not ABET accredited (even though the undergrad EE program is). NCEES evaluation is a possibility in my state, but I do not believe that they will consider my physics courses toward their 48-hour requirement of engineering courses. I am wondering if there is anyone else who is/was in a similar situation and was able to take the FE. I believe there are some states that allow engineering MS degree holders to take the FE and become an EIT. Otherwise, it may be that I have to take some post bac classes in engineering for a year to make up for this requirement (expensive).

Thanks in advance! :)
 

squaretaper LIT AF PE

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I am wondering if there is anyone else who is/was in a similar situation and was able to take the FE. I believe there are some states that allow engineering MS degree holders to take the FE and become an EIT.
What state are you in? I'm in California. I graduated with an MS in mechanical and, like you, I did NOT receive a BS degree in engineering. Passed the FE and registered as an EIT with no problems. I can say that, at least in California, as long as the undergraduate curriculum is ABET accredited, that's enough to verify that the MS program is suitable for the educational requirement, YMMV. Best of luck!

Edit: Forgot to add timeframes - graduated with MS in 2015, passed FE in 2016, I probably could/should have taken the FE exam during the grad program but I'm a procrastinator... If you're just about to graduate, it's my opinion you can take the FE immediately (sit for the exam while the material is fresh in your brain!).
 
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AstroStudent

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What state are you in? I'm in California. I graduated with an MS in mechanical and, like you, I did NOT receive a BS degree in engineering. Passed the FE and registered as an EIT with no problems. I can say that, at least in California, as long as the undergraduate curriculum is ABET accredited, that's enough to verify that the MS program is suitable for the educational requirement, YMMV. Best of luck!

Edit: Forgot to add timeframes - graduated with MS in 2015, passed FE in 2016, I probably could/should have taken the FE exam during the grad program but I'm a procrastinator... If you're just about to graduate, it's my opinion you can take the FE immediately (sit for the exam while the material is fresh in your brain!).

Thanks for the response. I am in Ohio and this doesn't seem to be the case. Can I easily register for the CA exam and take it in my state?
 

CAPLS

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@AstroStudent - In CA, the requirement for the EIT is 3 years of engineering education (doesn't matter if its ABET or not) or 3 years of engineering experience, or a combo of education/experience totaling 3 years. It is self certifying.

CA (like some other states) allows you to register with NCEES for the FE exam without providing proof of education/experience and there is no need to contact the CA Board first. Other states require proof of the education, in the form of transcripts, before allowing you to register for the FE exam. You can sit anywhere NCEES offers the FE exam which is computer-based.
 

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