Do all states have Env. E PEs?

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Tark62

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California is a state that does not register environmental engineers.
California does not license Environmental Engineers, or offer the Environmental PE exam.

I don't think Alaska or Hawaii do either.

 
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M

meg

California does not license Environmental Engineers, or offer the Environmental PE exam. I don't think Alaska or Hawaii do either.
So if you have an Env. PE and want to work in one of those states, do you have to take another PE exam to be considered a PE there?

 
G

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So if you have an Env. PE and want to work in one of those states, do you have to take another PE exam to be considered a PE there?
The issue comes down to what scope of services you are offering as a LICENSED Professional Engineer on a state-by-state basis. Most states license engineers by GENERAL licensure, meaning you are recognized as a Professional Engineer but your licensure does not call out your discipline (Civil, Mechanical, etc.). In the case of general licensure, each state has additional rules that cover practicing engineering within your area of competency. Other states, like California, license by specific discipline (e.g. Civil, Mechanical, Geotechnical, etc.) that require very specific examination requirements and ultimately have a very specific scope of services for which a person licensed in THAT discipline may sign/seal or certify as a professional engineer.

I am an environmental engineer by education and experience but opted to take the civil engineering exam for portability as well as credibility for doing work traditionally associated with civil engineering. Generally speaking, every state recognizes civil engineering and would most likely cover the scope of services offered by an environmental engineer, but I would point out that state rules vary and you would want to consult specific state rules before making any decisions.

Also, there is some good material and discussion in the Environmental Exam Prep Forum that may also be helpful.

Regards,

JR

 

Dleg

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^^ Check this big compilation of info from NCEES regarding different state's licensing requirements:

http://www.ncees.org/licensure/licensing_r.../survey_e.pdf#9

It certainly does appear that aside from California, Alaska, Hawaii, and Guam also do not license Environmental Engineers. However, I know for a fact that at least 2 environmental engineers are licensed in GU as enviros (I took my exam there, in fact), and I remember some conversations over on "the other board" last year where a few people said that CA licensed them by reciprocity as Civil Engineers, with the only requirement being that they had to take the CA seismic and surveying exams. I also think that I might have met a couple of enviro PEs from Hawaii, as well, who said they took the enviro exam as well, but maybe somewhere else first.

I think it's absurd that a few states/territories don't recognize the enviro exam. Must be some civils on their boards with their ... underwear all bunched up about civil tradition or something, or worried that they will somehow lose some of their business if an enviro PE shows up to compete with them. Which is extremely unlikely. But last I checked, only the enviro exam covers air pollution control and a few other enviro subjects such as solid waste, so I think it's pretty foolish that these few states don't recognize it, yet allow licensed civil (?) PEs to practice in areas of expertise they have not been tested in.

I suspect that it's only a matter of time before the remaining 4 states recognize enviro and offer the exam, especially with so much precedent having been set already in recognition by comity (or is it reciprocity?).

 
B

Brianne

In California we also have Registered Environmental Assessors (REA), a license without an examination that is based solely on experience and recommendations. There are two levels of REA (I (5 years) and II (8 years)) and an REA II can sign and stamp some environmental assessments just like a PE or a PG. It's a pain that I had to take the Civil PE, but I think it will be worth more in the long run. (If/when I pass of course)

I don't think I'll have to pursue the REA II because it's a much longer application, requires lengthier recommendations (including one from an agency), and won't give me any more power than the PE. But REA I can be required by some who follow AAI standards for Phase I work.

 

Dleg

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OK, so CA has REAs and PGs and REHSs and PEs (civil only). Which ones are authorized to design air emissions controls? Which ones are authorized to conduct air emissions testing? Just curious because I know the Env. Eng. PE exam covers those subjects, and I am farily certain the Civil - enviro/WR does not. I don't know about the other titles above, except that RG's don't know anything about air either.

Not trying to be a jerk, just trying to point out how shortsighted it is for a state (CA) to turn a blind eye to a branch of engineering that is NOT covered in whole by other branches.

 
G

Guest

^^^ I was curious about the scope of practice for each of those licensed classifications as well. Do you have a link that spells out duties and responsibilties granted for each?

And Dleg .. don't be hatin' on me because I took the Civil PE exam. :p I can run some pretty mean air emissions calcs !! :p10940623:

JR

 

Desert Engineer

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I found some info on REAs in CA:

Here is the REA website:

http://www.dtsc.ca.gov/REA/index.cfm

I found this excerpt on the REA website:

The Registered Environmental Assessor Program advises Registered Environmental Assessor I (REA I) and Registered Environmental Assessor II (REA II) holders of the following:

Registration as an REA I or an REA II is not a substitute for licensure as a professional engineer or a professional geologist. The California Department of Consumer Affairs Board for Geologists and Geophysicists and the Board for Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors are authorized to take disciplinary actions for the unlicensed practice of Geology or Engineering and acts of professional negligence, fraud, or other violations of statute. Should either board take actions against an REA I or REA II, the individual shall also be subject to a fact finding review by Registered Environmental Assessor Program staff and be subject to revocation of the REA registration.

I also found this letter from the RG board:

http://www.dtsc.ca.gov/REA/upload/joint.pdf

 

Dleg

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^^^ I was curious about the scope of practice for each of those licensed classifications as well. Do you have a link that spells out duties and responsibilties granted for each?
And Dleg .. don't be hatin' on me because I took the Civil PE exam. :p I can run some pretty mean air emissions calcs !! :p10940623:

JR
I'm just basing it on the exam specs published by NCEES.

I'm not trying to disparage anyone who has a civil PE, because I know there are plenty of people out there working in air with civil (or even ME) PEs, and it's all based on what you learn on the job and in school anyway. But from what I understand, the Civil PE exam(s) don't cover air pollution, while the Enviro exam does (among other things that are left uncovered), and it just seems foolish that the CA Board would let a gap in the testing like that exist.

Like I said, I'm not trying to be a jerk. I just want to point out something that doesn't make sense to me, and also personally affects me because I have an Enviro PE and would probably have to jump through hoops (of fire) to get a CA PE. Which I probably wouldn't, but you never know!

 

Dleg

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^^^ I was curious about the scope of practice for each of those licensed classifications as well. Do you have a link that spells out duties and responsibilties granted for each?
And Dleg .. don't be hatin' on me because I took the Civil PE exam. :p I can run some pretty mean air emissions calcs !! :p10940623:

JR
I'm just basing it on the exam specs published by NCEES.

I'm not trying to disparage anyone who has a civil PE, because I know there are plenty of people out there working in air with civil (or even ME) PEs, and it's all based on what you learn on the job and in school anyway. But from what I understand, the Civil PE exam(s) don't cover air pollution, while the Enviro exam does (among other things that are left uncovered), and it just seems foolish that the CA Board would let a gap in the testing like that exist.

Like I said, I'm not trying to be a jerk. I just want to point out something that doesn't make sense to me, and also personally affects me because I have an Enviro PE and would probably have to jump through hoops (of fire) to get a CA PE. Which I probably wouldn't, but you never know!

 
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The issue comes down to what scope of services you are offering as a LICENSED Professional Engineer on a state-by-state basis. Most states license engineers by GENERAL licensure, meaning you are recognized as a Professional Engineer but your licensure does not call out your discipline (Civil, Mechanical, etc.). In the case of general licensure, each state has additional rules that cover practicing engineering within your area of competency. Other states, like California, license by specific discipline (e.g. Civil, Mechanical, Geotechnical, etc.) that require very specific examination requirements and ultimately have a very specific scope of services for which a person licensed in THAT discipline may sign/seal or certify as a professional engineer.
I am an environmental engineer by education and experience but opted to take the civil engineering exam for portability as well as credibility for doing work traditionally associated with civil engineering. Generally speaking, every state recognizes civil engineering and would most likely cover the scope of services offered by an environmental engineer, but I would point out that state rules vary and you would want to consult specific state rules before making any decisions.

Also, there is some good material and discussion in the Environmental Exam Prep Forum that may also be helpful.

Regards,

JR

HI does not offer the PE Exam in Environmental Engineering. The PE license is generic; it does not state a specific discipline.

Unlike other states, HI classifies Civil and Structural as 2 separate, distinct disciplines.

Like yourself, I'm learning quite a lot from this forum. For example, one of the PEs that I know informally, is a ChE by degree, but took the PE exam in CE since there was no ChE PE exam at the time and it still isn't offered in HI. However, if I worked for her company she could not serve as a supervisory reference for taking the PE Exam since HI requires that the supervisory references be licensed in the specific discipline that the applicant is taking the exam. Obviously, one can see the "Catch-22" --- since a person's license does not state a specific discipline, unless one inquires, then one would not know. Other PEs have stated they have had interviewees turn down job offers from their company because the applicant would not be working under a licensed PE in their specific discipline, thus hindering their ability to take the PE exam in HI.
 

Dleg

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^Sounds like HI is a lot like the Northern Marianas used to be. I had that problem, and just kept pestering the board and their legal counsel, and ultimately drafted up this 60-page (plus) "appeal" on their original decision to deny me the ability to take the exam (which was purely because my degree was ME, my supervising PEs were all CE, and I wanted to take the env. PE exam). After five years - no exageration - the licensing statue was finally amended, and the Board adopted as a policy the ability to allow testing and registration in all branches offered by NCEES. And thanks to that, I now have two additional initials after my name.

(actually I am not sure how much my "appeal" influenced that change, and how much was influence by a small number of other local engineers who were having simlar problems being licensed)

Anyway, I recommend that you and every other engineer having problems in HI (or even CA) just continue to hound the Board. The squeeky wheel does indeed sometimes get the grease.

 
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^Sounds like HI is a lot like the Northern Marianas used to be. I had that problem, and just kept pestering the board and their legal counsel, and ultimately drafted up this 60-page (plus) "appeal" on their original decision to deny me the ability to take the exam (which was purely because my degree was ME, my supervising PEs were all CE, and I wanted to take the env. PE exam). After five years - no exageration - the licensing statue was finally amended, and the Board adopted as a policy the ability to allow testing and registration in all branches offered by NCEES. And thanks to that, I now have two additional initials after my name.
(actually I am not sure how much my "appeal" influenced that change, and how much was influence by a small number of other local engineers who were having simlar problems being licensed)

Anyway, I recommend that you and every other engineer having problems in HI (or even CA) just continue to hound the Board. The squeeky wheel does indeed sometimes get the grease.
Thanks for the uplift :) Between Mary and yourself I have recaptured some of my self-esteem.

 

heretic23

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^Sounds like HI is a lot like the Northern Marianas used to be. I had that problem, and just kept pestering the board and their legal counsel, and ultimately drafted up this 60-page (plus) "appeal" on their original decision to deny me the ability to take the exam (which was purely because my degree was ME, my supervising PEs were all CE, and I wanted to take the env. PE exam). After five years - no exageration - the licensing statue was finally amended, and the Board adopted as a policy the ability to allow testing and registration in all branches offered by NCEES. And thanks to that, I now have two additional initials after my name.

(actually I am not sure how much my "appeal" influenced that change, and how much was influence by a small number of other local engineers who were having simlar problems being licensed)

Anyway, I recommend that you and every other engineer having problems in HI (or even CA) just continue to hound the Board. The squeeky wheel does indeed sometimes get the grease.
I'm in California now but PE would just get me a raise a little bit. I could take Env PE in Virginia but not sure it's worth it. What are some other states that license near me?
 

Hockey Eng

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I'm in California now but PE would just get me a raise a little bit. I could take Env PE in Virginia but not sure it's worth it. What are some other states that license near me?
I took my Enviro PE exam in Arizona and got licensed there. I'm applying for reciprocity as a Civil (WRE) in California, meaning I also have to pass the Seismic and Survey exams. This is the only way I've seen to do it. Actually I'm still waiting for approval to sit for those exams but I'm hopeful that my experience and references are sufficient to grant reciprocity.

Pretty much every other state near California licenses Enviro PE's but it's meaningless in California unfortunately. Many people including myself have some strong opinions on that but it is what it is and despite some meager efforts, doesn't seem like it's going to change any time soon.
 

mattl

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I took my Enviro PE exam in Arizona and got licensed there. I'm applying for reciprocity as a Civil (WRE) in California, meaning I also have to pass the Seismic and Survey exams. This is the only way I've seen to do it. Actually I'm still waiting for approval to sit for those exams but I'm hopeful that my experience and references are sufficient to grant reciprocity.

Pretty much every other state near California licenses Enviro PE's but it's meaningless in California unfortunately. Many people including myself have some strong opinions on that but it is what it is and despite some meager efforts, doesn't seem like it's going to change any time soon.
I'm not sure if it is in writing anywhere, but my understanding is it is standard practice in CA to accept the NCEES Env exam for Civil Licensure in CA. You do still have to take the additional CA tests for survey and seismic that are required for a Civil PE. So that being said, in 2021 Hawaii is the only state that does not recognize the Env NCEES test in regard to obtaining a PE license.
 
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