Can you transfer 8 hr Ca Civil PE exam pass to another state for a full license?

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I passed the CA Civil PE 8 hr but have not passed the survey and seismic. I was wondering if I could transfer my 8 hr results to Pennsylvania without taking the other two CA exams?

 

PlanCheckEng

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The 8-hr exam you passed is a national exam, I.E. it is valid for whatever state you would like to get licensed in. I recommend creating a "NCEES record" on the NCEES which speeds up the process to get licensed in many states. Note, most states outside of CA required 4 years of professional experience to qualify for licensure.

 
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The 8-hr exam you passed is a national exam, I.E. it is valid for whatever state you would like to get licensed in. I recommend creating a "NCEES record" on the NCEES which speeds up the process to get licensed in many states. Note, most states outside of CA required 4 years of professional experience to qualify for licensure.
If you do not currently hold a Professional Engineer license, then your application for licensure in another state (e.g. Pennsylvania) would have to satisfy the requirements for Initial Licensure in that state.  In many cases, this means you must also receive approval from that state's Board to sit for the PE exam prior to taking the exam.   A state Board may also limit out-of-state registrations to Comity application only (Georgia does this), or at minimum, question your application for licensure when you aren't licensed in your state of residence.  

It's also possible that obtaining Initial Licensure in a non-resident state could muck-up a future application for licensure in your home state.  

 
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PlanCheckEng

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If you do not currently hold a Professional Engineer license, then your application for licensure in another state (e.g. Pennsylvania) would have to satisfy the requirements for Initial Licensure in that state.  In many cases, this means you must also receive approval from that state's Board to sit for the PE exam prior to taking the exam.   A state Board may also limit out-of-state registrations to Comity application only (Georgia does this), or at minimum, question your application for licensure when you aren't licensed in your state of residence.  

It's also possible that obtaining Initial Licensure in a non-resident state could muck-up a future application for licensure in your home state.  
Very good points, thanks. 

"It's also possible that obtaining Initial Licensure in a non-resident state could muck-up a future application for licensure in your home state."

I've been wondering about this. Do you have any additional information or a source for this statement?  

 
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Very good points, thanks. 

"It's also possible that obtaining Initial Licensure in a non-resident state could muck-up a future application for licensure in your home state."

I've been wondering about this. Do you have any additional information or a source for this statement?  
Every Board is different, and each has its own idiosyncrasies.  The only surefire bet is to contact the Board in question.  

 

CAPLS

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For the most part, state licensing boards are changing how they view situations like this, especially as NCEES is transitioning exams to CBT.  The national Civil PE exam is accepted everywhere.  You can simply apply at whatever state you want to for a license (and meet those education/experience requirements) and they will generally accept that you've already passed the Civil PE exam if you login to your NCEES registration account and request an exam/license verification from California to that state.

 

Redleader

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I was under the impression that to seek "reciprocity" it would require that you are already licensed in the state you are coming from. I guess this is not a matter of reciprocity then but of applying for the exame and showing that you ahve indeed already passed it in your home state?
 

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