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3 hours ago, tj_PE said:

I'm thankful for the upcoming long weekend (if i can get all my work done, i'll have 4 days!!!!!!!!!!!!!) so i can catch up on studying but still have a day of laziness. 

Nice!  My hubs is taking a 4 day this weekend.  Kinda jelly, since I get a 1 day, with class all day saturday.  

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 photo CHPE_AnimatedWebBanner_650x1202_zps5704d467.gif

This is a four day weekend???  Saaaaaaay what?? 

 

tenor-1.gif

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On 2/10/2020 at 4:31 PM, tj_PE said:

I'm at about 10 right now as well, ramping up to ideally 16-20 for just vertical

You mean per week? or in total? I would like to know how many hours you spent for each exam in addition to your review courses. thanks for your help.

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On 12/19/2019 at 11:17 AM, David Connor, SE said:

Definitely split up the components. I took lateral first because it was easier to study for. Vertical has such broad base of questions that could be asked. 

Definitely the SEAOC IBC Seismic Design Manuals for lateral. Just study those and maybe take a review course and you should be OK for lateral. 

Follow the NCEES specs. for what to study.  Try not to stray off into subject matter that would probably not be covered by the exam. 

Hi David, I believe you are very proficient in Masonry design. could you tell me the differences between 2011 edition and 2013 editions of  Building code requirements and specifications for masonry structures? The current SE exam requires 2013 edition. do you think if it is ok to take edition 2011 since this is the only one I have now. Thanks.

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On 2/19/2020 at 1:14 AM, AndieWoooooooo said:

Hi David, I believe you are very proficient in Masonry design. could you tell me the differences between 2011 edition and 2013 editions of  Building code requirements and specifications for masonry structures? The current SE exam requires 2013 edition. do you think if it is ok to take edition 2011 since this is the only one I have now. Thanks.

Not sure where you heard I was proficient in masonry design, but I have done some masonry walls before. :) .  Anyway, I don't know all of the differences between the 2011 and 2013 masonry code so I would bring the code that the test is based on. I have heard others say that they had questions before that if you had an older version of the code you could arrive at an answer in the multiple choices, but it would be wrong because you are using the old code.  Also, for the essay questions you need to site chapters and sections that you are using, and an old code may have a different section number, etc. 

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Buying the latest and greatest codes is part of the process here and even if you dont need them beyond the test its still nice to have bc you never know.

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On 1/10/2020 at 9:16 AM, dlegofan said:

I do recommend PPI just for the sake of the one-on-one with the instructor and collaboration with classmates. Here are some things that helped me:

-Get all your books early and every time you study, lay them out on a desk the size of the testing desk. Put your books in the same place every time. The more you simulate how you will actually take the exam, the more comfortable you will feel. Personally, I separated into 4 stacks: materials (steel, concrete, timber, masonry), AASHTO, design codes (IBC/ASCE 7, etc.), everything else.

-Break up AASHTO into 4 sections: Ch. 1-4, Ch 5, Ch 6, everything else

-Make a binder with helpful cheat sheets. For example, I made a quick-reference for rebar development lengths.

-You need to study every chance you get. I took 1 week off for a vacation about midway through and studied about 400 hours total. You are going to sacrifice a lot of time, but your family and friends are also going to sacrifice time with you as well. Make sure to tell them upfront the commitment you are making. You don't want to have to retake the test and have them go through it again. (That was a big motivator for me)

-If you have a weakness, the test will exploit it. You need to know everything or at least where everything is located.

-Don't bring extra books that you don't need. You will just waste time thumbing through them.

-Make notes in all of the references. I drew pictures. I wrote what page number to go to instead of the section because it's quicker to find a page number. I made a chart of beta values for concrete. if a section called for iteration, I made a table when possible. Etc. Anything that saves you time and brain power will help.

-Leave time to study your weakest subject last. That way, it is the freshest in your mind. But you need to make sure you have enough time to study for it. For me, I left about 1 month.

Hi Man, did you pass the exams for buildings or bridges?

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