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LyceeFruit

Completed Problem Sets & Organization

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So last spring, I re-organized my completed problems by approximate topic.

I did it too close to the test to really break it down further and create an index.

I'm looking to re-do my completed problems but I wondering if my method would make sense to me in the long run or now.

 

I currently have it broken out like this:
NESC problems
NEC motor problems

lighting

lightning & surge protection

transformers

motors

generators

T-lines

NEC grounding problems

power flow

etc

 

So motors end up being any non-NEC motor problem. same with generators. etc.

Some areas are really broken out, others aren't.

 

I'm wondering if it'd make more sense to organize it by problem set:

NCEES

Complex Imaginary Exam 1

Eng Pro Guide Full Exam

Eng Pro Guide Final Exam

etc.

 

And then the problems within each set are in numerical order & I can make an index like

"Parallel Transformers: NCEES prob X, Eng Prob Guide pro Y"

 

</ramble>

 

How do *you* organize your completed problems? What are subject categories you use?

Looking for ideas/inspirations!

(I realize what works for one won't work for others but I'm pretty sure my current plan isn't working)

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12 minutes ago, Wow! said:

I’m doing it the first way you said 👍

It works for me until I get to the motors, generators, transformers. 

 

The binders are getting out of hand LOL 

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28 minutes ago, LyceeFruit said:

It works for me until I get to the motors, generators, transformers. 

 

The binders are getting out of hand LOL 

I can relate to that.  I’ve written down a lot!

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14 minutes ago, Wow! said:

I can relate to that.  I’ve written down a lot!

my hand hurts so much. and i have a callus on one of my fingers from the way I hold my pen lol 

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Right now I have three main "go-to" binders with nothing but practice problems worked out and tabbed in sections exactly like the poster "ItsStudyTime" did.  I liked her method and I'm following it.  So far I'm filling up one 3-ring binder pretty fast.  I bought a 4-ring, but the rings aren't completely round and that makes it hard to flip from section to section quickly like I will have to during the exam, so I put the Eng Pro Guides study guide in the 4-ring since I will probably look at it the least during the exam (all my formulas and "go-to" problems and notes will be in the 3-ring).  

Since I know the 3-ring will get quite full (as it already is), I have two smaller binders, one with just codes problems and the other I will fill with the "Protection" sections, since I've been doing quite a bit of work in that area. 

3-main "go-to" binders should be plenty.  This will allow to me to have to sort through fewer references, since 3 main binders is a lot better than 6-8 reference manuals/folders/books (when I took it last year).

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@MEtoEE I also plan to re-organize/condense my reference binders.

 

I want to end up with: 1-2 problem set binders (likely 1 large, one smaller like you) and then 1 large reference note binder.

Annoyingly, my NEC, NESC, and other codes are also in binders so I'm trying to limit the number of binders.

 

I'm considering trying to figure out how to use my office thermal binder machine so I could bind my notes that way LOL

 

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I uploaded my TOC on this website (Under Step 2). It was for the Oct 2017 exam, so it'll need tweaking. I did spend a lot of time on it though, starting from the exam topics breakdown provided and then tweaking/moving/revising/changing as I figured out what 'went together' and what didn't. It worked really well for me in the end 😃

I mention this in the writeup, but I also added little 'notes' to the top right corner of each page to help me quickly find stuff within the sections. Something like 'motors; DC; theory' for a problem that was about DC motors, and was a theory based problem (vs. math/number based). 

I was able to navigate  my binder really quickly because of this.

Good luck!

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17 hours ago, ItsStudyTime! said:

I uploaded my TOC on this website (Under Step 2). It was for the Oct 2017 exam, so it'll need tweaking. I did spend a lot of time on it though, starting from the exam topics breakdown provided and then tweaking/moving/revising/changing as I figured out what 'went together' and what didn't. It worked really well for me in the end 😃

I mention this in the writeup, but I also added little 'notes' to the top right corner of each page to help me quickly find stuff within the sections. Something like 'motors; DC; theory' for a problem that was about DC motors, and was a theory based problem (vs. math/number based). 

I was able to navigate  my binder really quickly because of this.

Good luck!

So far I'm finding all the above very useful.  The last practice exam I took went much better since I had a lot of equations and example problems/notes categorized into one binder, versus trying to remember which of my reference books (some tabbed well, some not) had the best notes.  There are a couple of problems which I had a difficult time putting in the "correct" category, since sometimes problems can fit in 2 or more categories, but if I can't decide I just make a copy of it and put it in both.

My only deviation is I have yet to look at anything related to Thevinin's Equivalent circuits.  I have not studied this since college, and I don't recall it ever being a topic on any practice exam or online course I've taken.  

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31 minutes ago, MEtoEE said:

There are a couple of problems which I had a difficult time putting in the "correct" category, since sometimes problems can fit in 2 or more categories, but if I can't decide I just make a copy of it and put it in both.

This is exactly what i did when that happened! Should have mentioned that. It was only a handful of problems that I 'copied'. 😃

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33 minutes ago, MEtoEE said:

My only deviation is I have yet to look at anything related to Thevinin's Equivalent circuits.  I have not studied this since college, and I don't recall it ever being a topic on any practice exam or online course I've taken.  

Interesting. I went and looked at the TOC to see what you were talking about and noticed a spelling mistake (face palm). Whatever! I was tired! 

Anyway, I think that must have come from the PPi book section on DC? I generally lumped everything 'DC' under that section, and I recall reviewing thevenin/norton because it was in someone's sequence of review items. I don't see it directly listed in the NCEES breakdown from my year, nor do I see it in Eng Pro Guides book, so I doubt it is super relevant. I also learned that in college and then never touched it again....ha!

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Going through different practice exams (Graffeo, NCEES, Eng Pro Guides), I'm starting to really notice how some things which didn't quite click are starting to make more sense (for example solving for line current on a 3-phase delta-wye system).  Two very similar problems (well almost exactly worded problems with the values changed) can be solved differently (or in more/fewer steps) depending on the source.  For example, the Eng Pro Guides is easy to follow, but I learned from Zach's course how to write single-line equivalent circuits to save time and make the problem easier to solve.  It's also provided eye-openers as to why or why not I may have made mistakes on some types of problems during the actual exam.  

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On 9/25/2019 at 7:57 AM, MEtoEE said:

Going through different practice exams (Graffeo, NCEES, Eng Pro Guides), I'm starting to really notice how some things which didn't quite click are starting to make more sense (for example solving for line current on a 3-phase delta-wye system).  Two very similar problems (well almost exactly worded problems with the values changed) can be solved differently (or in more/fewer steps) depending on the source.  For example, the Eng Pro Guides is easy to follow, but I learned from Zach's course how to write single-line equivalent circuits to save time and make the problem easier to solve.  It's also provided eye-openers as to why or why not I may have made mistakes on some types of problems during the actual exam.  

Yay!!! I remember having a few of these 'click' moments. THE BEST! These were really great for my mental health in the last few weeks before the exam. There were just more and more 'oh THATS WHAT THAT MEANS' moments. SO good. I'm so happy for you! I'm sure there is more to come!

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I relied to look more in my notes on topics such as reliability, NEC code problems, megger, insulation testing  etc, something you don't do everyday and has a tendency to forget. On other regular electrical engineering topics such as Power factor calculation, Wye/Delta problems, Per unit problems, I relied more on my practice leading up to the exam, knowing in my head than referring material notes. Obviously, notes are there to refer in case you forget some formula or concept.

For e.g. PU 7-8 formulas, I totally relied on my memory. This speeds things up considerably. Also, when you practice for 3-4 months a lot of these things stick in your head anyway. 

Too much reliance on notes, reference material can backfire. Leading upto exam, we should already know steps and concepts on how to solve many of the problems, a lot of them from back of mind.  

You may find there is not too much time to keep flipping back and forth, the nervousness also kicks in. I organized my theory notes by the same topics as listed in official syllabus. I filed all problems by the same topic but in a seperate folder. I did this so as to not have one topic which is voluminous, making search longer. If I knew, I needed to look up problems then I skip the theory folder and go right to the problem folder.   

  There are people really good at organizing, neatness, methodical, I knew up front I was not one of them. I was more of a memory type.  Whatever you end up doing besure to tab your material. 

Edited by roy167
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