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Hello everybody. I'll be moving to the US next month and I'm trying to figure out whether to use NCEES or WES for credential evaluation or not even get an evaluation at all. I have a bachelor's degree in Electronics Engineering from a Brazilian university. It will be a couple of months after I arrive in the country that I'll have a worker's permit, so I have some time to figure what to do.

I've seen lots of posts here talking about NCEES credential evaluation being needed to sit for an FE exam and I get that, but I also found this company called World Education Services (WES) that offers credential evaluations not only for licensing puposes but also for educational, if I want to go to grad school at some point for example.

Essentially, I wanna figure what's the best course of action to take. I definitely need to work when I get my permit to help support my fiancee, so grad school is something I don't yet can/want to do. Does anybody know if WES credential evaluation is also accepted to sit for an FE exam? Is getting a credential evaluation and taking the FE even necessary for an entry level position? Is it something that can be postponed?

Thank you in advance!

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Welcome!

These are two different pathways for two different goals.

NCEES is only concerned with your background with respect to professional licensing. If you're interested in sitting for the FE exam, you need to follow whatever NCEES asks you specifically to do. I would reach out to them directly. As far as I know, there's no requirement to have a credentials verification to register for the FE exam (at least here in California). You just log in, sign up, and pay. You could probably take the exam the day you arrive!

With respect to your job question, the answer is no, it is not a requirement to take the FE exam for any job (if it is, they will say so explicitly), but having the EIT certificate can help distinguish yourself.

Edited by squaretaper PE

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Thank you for your reply @squaretaper PE. I contacted the Pennsylvania Licensing Board a while ago, since it's the state I'll be living in. They told to me get a NCEES credential evaluation and get back to them for further instructions. About the FE exam, to sign up for it you have to put in the University you attended and they only have domestic ones listed. I did do an exchange program in 2015 and attended a school in Rhode Island, wonder if I could put that one in there...On another hand, I have a friend that is a Civil Engineer and is in a situation similar to mine, he was able to sign up for the FE exam after requesting that NCEES added his brazilian university to the list. I don't know if the exam will have any validity without a credential evaluation though. Thing is, I don't even know if I'll get a job in the small central Pennsylvania town my fiancee lives in because there are barely any opportunities there so why bother getting licensed in PA? I must be honest and say that I don't know how the licensure procedure works in its entirety. Am I right to assume that regardless of getting licensed in PA, passing the FE exam is a general first requirement for licensure in any american state? Here in Brazil the licensing procedure is a bit more straight forward and I apologize if I'm asking things that are considered common knowledge.

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Hi @Banzee95, no problem! No need to apologize, we recognize it's the United States of America, not the Uniform States of America. So, every state is just a *little* bit different in requirements and procedures. Sorry, that's the game! :rotflmao:

So, a common misunderstanding is actually about terminology, and so your understanding is correct. The FE is the exam you take (which is NOT state dependent). The EIT (or some states call it "EI" for Engineer Intern) is the certificate/classification that identifies you as an engineer-in-training (which IS state dependent and you have to apply for a certificate). I highly recommend at least taking the FE exam as soon as you can. It's not difficult and not too expensive, most candidates take and pass it in their third or fourth year in university. Then, depending on where you land with Banzee95Spouse, you can apply for EIT status at that point. If you're out looking for a job, even saying that you passed the FE exam (implying that your EIT status is pending) could be a positive data point for the interview panel.

Boa sorte!

 

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