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HotFudge

POWER EXAM ADVICE

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I recently failed with a 67:( 3rd try but i have progressively improved, 58,61 and now 67. I took all these exams back to back to back. Should i take time off (i feel like i will forget everything that i have learned) or should i shoot for the exam in the fall. Please advise based on your experience from multiple attempts.

 

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1 hour ago, HotFudge said:

I recently failed with a 67:( 3rd try but i have progressively improved, 58,61 and now 67. I took all these exams back to back to back. Should i take time off (i feel like i will forget everything that i have learned) or should i shoot for the exam in the fall. Please advise based on your experience from multiple attempts.

 

Thanks

I cant advise based on multiple attempts, but:

  • you have an upwards score trajectory,
  • This test was rumored to be harder then the last (and pass rate statistics suggest that as well),
  • a time limit until the test radically changes and becomes computerized,
  • and the specter of the requirements needed to sit for the PE exam always in flux (requiring a masters, years experience, etc.)

If you can sit again without penalty and you aren't going crazy, keep at it.

 

*Edit,

You may have passed if this was one of the "easier" prior tests.

Edited by Szar
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6 hours ago, HotFudge said:

I recently failed with a 67:( 3rd try but i have progressively improved, 58,61 and now 67. I took all these exams back to back to back. Should i take time off (i feel like i will forget everything that i have learned) or should i shoot for the exam in the fall. Please advise based on your experience from multiple attempts.

 

Thanks

I have taken the exam multiple times - 4 times to be exact.  The third attempt did not count and NCEES cancelled it because my exam book had printing issues so it was not counted against me.  This was a definite low period for me because I studied for 4 months and sat 8 hours for the exam for it be tossed.  Failing multiple times does make you question whether or not you have the will to continue.  Deferring my next attempt did cross my mind but my concern was forgetting concepts.  However, I did pass on my 4th attempt this past April and I am relieved because it was the most difficult compared to the last 3 exams.  So I would recommend to sit for the next exam.  Why stop the momentum when you see your scores improving with each attempt?  Don't be discouraged.  Good luck!!

Out of curiosity, based on your 67% how many problems did you answer incorrectly?

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20 hours ago, HotFudge said:

I recently failed with a 67:( 3rd try but i have progressively improved, 58,61 and now 67. I took all these exams back to back to back. Should i take time off (i feel like i will forget everything that i have learned) or should i shoot for the exam in the fall. Please advise based on your experience from multiple attempts.

 

Thanks

Hi HotFudge,

I've never seen a score as high as 67% not pass.  How many total questions did you answer correctly according to the "Your Performance (No. Corrected)" column on your diagnostic report?

We've helped a lot of engineers pass that have failed multiple attempts. The majority of time it comes down to not putting in enough hours per week soon enough prior to the PE exam. You can read more about the study habits that successful engineers that pass the PE exam have in common

Our most common advice is to take the exam back to back to take advantage of what you learned the previous attempt without having to waste time relearning unless you anticipate having major time commitments this time around such as wedding planning or an intensive work travel arrangement. 

Edited by Zach Stone, P.E.

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22 hours ago, Szar said:

I cant advise based on multiple attempts, but:

  • you have an upwards score trajectory,
  • This test was rumored to be harder then the last (and pass rate statistics suggest that as well),
  • a time limit until the test radically changes and becomes computerized,
  • and the specter of the requirements needed to sit for the PE exam always in flux (requiring a masters, years experience, etc.)

If you can sit again without penalty and you aren't going crazy, keep at it.

 

*Edit,

You may have passed if this was one of the "easier" prior tests.

You have a good point. I appreciate you input! I didn't see studying for the exam as a burden because I am learning a lot about the power industry and i take that as a positive.

17 hours ago, Kalika PE said:

I have taken the exam multiple times - 4 times to be exact.  The third attempt did not count and NCEES cancelled it because my exam book had printing issues so it was not counted against me.  This was a definite low period for me because I studied for 4 months and sat 8 hours for the exam for it be tossed.  Failing multiple times does make you question whether or not you have the will to continue.  Deferring my next attempt did cross my mind but my concern was forgetting concepts.  However, I did pass on my 4th attempt this past April and I am relieved because it was the most difficult compared to the last 3 exams.  So I would recommend to sit for the next exam.  Why stop the momentum when you see your scores improving with each attempt?  Don't be discouraged.  Good luck!!

Out of curiosity, based on your 67% how many problems did you answer incorrectly?

Oh WOW! That must have been tough to go through. Did you have to pay again the 4th time or were you reimbursed? Thank for the encouragement! I ended up fixing my weak areas and in turn, performed poorly on my strong areas so i am happy that i have improved and now i just need to be as in-depth on my strengths as i was on my weaknesses.

3 hours ago, Zach Stone, P.E. said:

Hi HotFudge,

I've never seen a score as high as 67% not pass.  How many total questions did you answer correctly according to the "Your Performance (No. Corrected)" column on your diagnostic report?

We've helped a lot of engineers pass that have failed multiple attempts. The majority of time it comes down to not putting in enough hours per week soon enough prior to the PE exam. You can read more about the study habits that successful engineers that pass the PE exam have in common

Our most common advice is to take the exam back to back to take advantage of what you learned the previous attempt without having to waste time relearning unless you anticipate having major time commitments this time around such as wedding planning or an intensive work travel arrangement. 

In Texas they give you your grades and mine was a 67. I scored 46/80 and I am assuming they gave a +10 curve to your overall score. I really enjoyed your course Zach and it improved my grade from a 58 (self study) to a 67. This exam had a lot of problems that i had no idea what to do and some were down to two guesses and i guess i just didn't make the cut this time around. I will register and begin solving problems again July and that should give me 4 solid months to ready my self mentally for this attempt in the Fall.

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Not sure if you have already looked at this, but since April 2018 was the first test after NCEES changed the specifications, its worth noting.  These guys did a pretty good job of outlining the changes: http://www.electricalpereview.com/changes-ncees-exam-specifications/

Edited by OhPowerPE
removed some info
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49 minutes ago, OhPowerPE said:

Not sure if you have already looked at this, but since April 2018 was the first test after NCEES changed the specifications, its worth noting.  These guys did a pretty good job of outlining the changes: http://www.electricalpereview.com/changes-ncees-exam-specifications/

Just got to the section of my link where it shows the author and it is Zach Stone, and I saw that he posted and it looks like you took his course, so feel free to ignore my comments haha.

Edited by OhPowerPE

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@OhPowerPE Haha no worries...i am well accustomed to this new testing format and i will need to dive deeper to have a better chance next go around.

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Don't get discouraged. I passed the EIT the first time through, but it took me multiple times to pass the PE. Failing was due to multiple issues. I'm 53, and I have been working in manufacturing since I graduated back in the 90's. Since I do not do electrical design work, I'm behind the eight ball compared to EEs designing electrical systems. Taking the power exam required me to self teach myself most all of the topics covered on the power exam. However, I did pass this past April, and I wanted to share my tips on what I did to pass. 

  • I would suggest taking a review course. Review course comments - I took Georgia Tech's PE review course, and I thought it to be better resource than the School of PE. The provided study notes and suggested textbooks were extremely helpful. My colleague took the School of PE and passed it the first time. He just had taken the EIT, and he was pretty fresh. He lent me his study material, and in comparison, I believe the Georgia Tech prepared me to answer the majority of questions on the exam, and Dr. Callen is very helpful and quickly responds to your questions. The school of PE strength's are in the outlier topics that they cover like batteries, hipot testing, etc.. Keep in mind, outlier questions are equally weighted compared to standard NEC questions like those covering voltage drop. Again, my colleague passed the first time after taking the School of PE, but I believe it had to do more to being fresh taking the EIT. I'm sure other review courses, like Zach Stone's, are just as helpful. 
  • One of the text books Dr. Callen recommended to purchase is titled, “Electric Machines and Power Systems” by Vincent Del Toro. I used this book to learn more about transformers and motors. In fact, Chapter 4, Section 4-12 titled, "CONTROLLERS FOR THREE-PHASE INDUCTION MOTORS" contains a reduced-voltage magnetic controller line circuit, Fig 4-38, that I used to help me answer an almost identical line circuit that was on the exam.
  • One textbook recommended on "engineerboards" that I found to be very useful is titled, "Electromechnical Energy Devices and Power Systems" By Zia Yamayee and Juan Bala. This book was an excellent complement to your review course. I was able to find the solutions manual online for chapters 2-8. The solutions manual really helped by including solutions for the drill problems and the end of chapter problems. I completed all the drill problems for chapters 2-8, and most of the end of the chapter questions. In addition, I reviewed chapters 9 and 10 as well, which was able to help me answer some relay and transmission line questions. 
  • There are a number of VFD questions on the exam, and I printed Siemens Step 2000 training module titled, "Basics of AC Drives," which helped me answer some VFD questions. I found that a lot of review material from School of PE, Georgia Tech, and others do not cover VFD questions, which in my opinion is a big oversight. However, I believe the Georgia Tech course is going include VFDs.  You can download the pdf by visiting the Siemens link http://www.sitrain-lms.com/step.aspx?fromLogin=true
  • Reviewing Youtube, MIT, and other online videos for topics to help me uderstand the topics. 

I would suggest taking time off. Take the review course, and get the highlighted books and solutions manual and start going over the questions. I made copies of the questions, and was extra neat with my answers to ensure that the answers would be a good resource to take into the exam. 

Don't give up! 

 

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20 hours ago, pittip said:

Don't get discouraged. I passed the EIT the first time through, but it took me multiple times to pass the PE. Failing was due to multiple issues. I'm 53, and I have been working in manufacturing since I graduated back in the 90's. Since I do not do electrical design work, I'm behind the eight ball compared to EEs designing electrical systems. Taking the power exam required me to self teach myself most all of the topics covered on the power exam. However, I did pass this past April, and I wanted to share my tips on what I did to pass. 

  • I would suggest taking a review course. Review course comments - I took Georgia Tech's PE review course, and I thought it to be better resource than the School of PE. The provided study notes and suggested textbooks were extremely helpful. My colleague took the School of PE and passed it the first time. He just had taken the EIT, and he was pretty fresh. He lent me his study material, and in comparison, I believe the Georgia Tech prepared me to answer the majority of questions on the exam, and Dr. Callen is very helpful and quickly responds to your questions. The school of PE strength's are in the outlier topics that they cover like batteries, hipot testing, etc.. Keep in mind, outlier questions are equally weighted compared to standard NEC questions like those covering voltage drop. Again, my colleague passed the first time after taking the School of PE, but I believe it had to do more to being fresh taking the EIT. I'm sure other review courses, like Zach Stone's, are just as helpful. 
  • One of the text books Dr. Callen recommended to purchase is titled, “Electric Machines and Power Systems” by Vincent Del Toro. I used this book to learn more about transformers and motors. In fact, Chapter 4, Section 4-12 titled, "CONTROLLERS FOR THREE-PHASE INDUCTION MOTORS" contains a reduced-voltage magnetic controller line circuit, Fig 4-38, that I used to help me answer an almost identical line circuit that was on the exam.
  • One textbook recommended on "engineerboards" that I found to be very useful is titled, "Electromechnical Energy Devices and Power Systems" By Zia Yamayee and Juan Bala. This book was an excellent complement to your review course. I was able to find the solutions manual online for chapters 2-8. The solutions manual really helped by including solutions for the drill problems and the end of chapter problems. I completed all the drill problems for chapters 2-8, and most of the end of the chapter questions. In addition, I reviewed chapters 9 and 10 as well, which was able to help me answer some relay and transmission line questions. 
  • There are a number of VFD questions on the exam, and I printed Siemens Step 2000 training module titled, "Basics of AC Drives," which helped me answer some VFD questions. I found that a lot of review material from School of PE, Georgia Tech, and others do not cover VFD questions, which in my opinion is a big oversight. However, I believe the Georgia Tech course is going include VFDs.  You can download the pdf by visiting the Siemens link http://www.sitrain-lms.com/step.aspx?fromLogin=true
  • Reviewing Youtube, MIT, and other online videos for topics to help me uderstand the topics. 

I would suggest taking time off. Take the review course, and get the highlighted books and solutions manual and start going over the questions. I made copies of the questions, and was extra neat with my answers to ensure that the answers would be a good resource to take into the exam. 

Don't give up! 

 

I understand you've mentioned some specific information unintentionally, but it just feels like you've shared too much information about the actual exam question. Maybe i am wrong but more experienced members of this board may know it better.

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