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NJmike PE

What does the Fox say?

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Looks like they carry the ASUS RT-N56U. Still a good router but at a budget price. Doesn't have the external antennas but still reports a solid reliable connection with a slick interface. Price shows $87 online.

Ok, since no one had it available in store pick up today, I went with this one and ordered it online. Thanks Jedi Master Fox. You rock.

You know what else geeks me out on these ASUS routers? If your primary internet connection goes down, you can connect your smartphone to the router via USB and it will pick up your broadband connection and broadcast it for temporary use. Pretty awesome. Though I'd be sure to watch the data usage when doing that. LOL

You get it all set up yet?

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Damn. I have not been able to get on here until until just now. That being said, I am back up and running. However, yesterday after work I got a little impulsive. I knew that no one had the Asus router short of ordering online and yet I wanted to resolve the issue by last night. So went to the Best Buy in search of a model in Stock. I was all set to purchase a Netgear either N750 or N900 (I can't remember) when I overheard a kid who works there talking about the AC bands and that they were the newest bands. And then the Belkin AC750 dualband router caught my eye. Granted it wasn't a 900 or 1200 but it essentially fit my needs. So I rolled the dice and bought it. Knowing that I have 15 days to return it if I'm not satisfied. And if I decide it early on, I will just order the Asus model online and just return the Belkin when the other is shipped.

That being said, so far I'm satisfied with the Belkin. It was very easy to install, the range is far better than the Linksys POS that I had, and it hasn't dropped out yet. Like I said, if I find that this one isn't what I first expected, I will order the Asus.

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The new wireless-AC band is the successor to wireless-N. And basically doubles the throughput. However, I guarantee you don't yet have any devices that can utilize the AC band. Like most, everyone still has N only devices. And N is currently fast enough to do most menial tasks. Belkin isn't terrible, it's still a well known name brand. And most devices run nice straight out of the box, it's more the question on how it will run 6 or 12 months from now. That's the kind of research I like to do before buying something. And why my current Linksys router is going on 5 years strong. ;)



Hopefully you don't have any issues like you were having before. Good luck!


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The new wireless-AC band is the successor to wireless-N. And basically doubles the throughput. However, I guarantee you don't yet have any devices that can utilize the AC band. Like most, everyone still has N only devices. And N is currently fast enough to do most menial tasks. Belkin isn't terrible, it's still a well known name brand. And most devices run nice straight out of the box, it's more the question on how it will run 6 or 12 months from now. That's the kind of research I like to do before buying something. And why my current Linksys router is going on 5 years strong. ;)

Hopefully you don't have any issues like you were having before. Good luck!

I totally realize that I made an itchy trigger finger move here. In my opinion if the thing lasts at least 12 months, I'll be happy. Either way, when it does crap out I plan to up my price range and get this done once and for all.

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Fox - I'm supposed to pick out a new computer, but from the specs they all sort of look the same to me. If I send you the list, can you help me choose?


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Fox - I'm supposed to pick out a new computer, but from the specs they all sort of look the same to me. If I send you the list, can you help me choose?

I'd be happy to Fraz. Send away! Or if you prefer, PM will work too.

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I am in need of a photo backup system. We literally have like 20k pictures stored on one external hard drive, two internal hard drives, Dropbox, and now photobucket. I have resigned myself to the fact that I'm going to have to spend some money but the question is do I invest in increased storage in the cloud (Dropbox / photobucket) which I'm currently only using the free amounts or do I buy a terabyte external hard disk? There are also some videos involved as well.

I worry about buying an external drive and it dying or getting too full, but the cloud isn't cheap and usually involves a yearly cost.

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^I keep a backup in the safe deposit box at the bank. I have two external disk drives and swap the latest backup for the one at the bank every so often. To me, cloud storage just means I'm depending on somebody else to maintain the data.

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One negative with an actual hardware type storage device is that it can get stolen... I lost so much when we were robbed back in 2009. Wedding photos, music, business plans, all gone because the drive was sitting out with our other electronics. just a point to make.


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^That sucks.

I don't think there is any perfect solution. All you can do is figure out what you're willing to pay vs. what risks you are willing to live with.

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I've been burning them to CDs or DVDs lately. Been considering flash drives too. I guess it's no different than an external HD

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I am in need of a photo backup system. We literally have like 20k pictures stored on one external hard drive, two internal hard drives,

20,000 photos isn't a lot... on the order of 100 GB. You can buy inexpensive 1TB+ drives for under $100. Buy two and back up regularly. Or stick with the cloud... Google is $24/year for 100 GB or $120/year for 1 TB.

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I am in need of a photo backup system. We literally have like 20k pictures stored on one external hard drive, two internal hard drives,

20,000 photos isn't a lot... on the order of 100 GB. You can buy inexpensive 1TB+ drives for under $100. Buy two and back up regularly. Or stick with the cloud... Google is $24/year for 100 GB or $120/year for 1 TB.

$120/yr for 1 TB on Google Drive is ridiculous. Since, as you pointed out, traditional hard drives are stupid cheap in the 1 TB range. Plus, I don't think that the cloud storage solution is as secure as they would have you believe. Plus, Google undoubtedly mines any data you put on their drives.

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I am in need of a photo backup system. We literally have like 20k pictures stored on one external hard drive, two internal hard drives, Dropbox, and now photobucket. I have resigned myself to the fact that I'm going to have to spend some money but the question is do I invest in increased storage in the cloud (Dropbox / photobucket) which I'm currently only using the free amounts or do I buy a terabyte external hard disk? There are also some videos involved as well.

I worry about buying an external drive and it dying or getting too full, but the cloud isn't cheap and usually involves a yearly cost.

LadyFox's brother is a part-time photographer and also runs his own mech. engineering business out of his home. He is very cautious about having back-ups for everything. In addition to running drive RAID set-ups (which I consequently built for him), he also pays for auto online back-ups to the cloud. And I know some of you shutter at the thought of that, but based on what he's told me the data is very safe and secure. Obviously there are always extenuating circumstances (i.e. acts of god) that could transpire, but that goes with any home solution as well. At least the cloud storage servers have multi-level RAID arrays and are protected within a temperature-controlled room which is protected by state-of-the-art Halon systems. I can't say the same for home user setups. LOL

That said, he uses a service called Backblaze ($50 per year for unlimited data isn't bad at all). I believe he has over 600GB worth of data (just multimedia alone). About 2 years ago he had a hard drive failure. As part of the plan, Backblaze transferred all his data to an external drive and shipped it to him next day. Since his data auto-syncs to this Backblaze service, no data was lost and he restored his everything. I've heard CrashPlan is another good online back-up solution. Here's a head-to-head match-up of both services from my PC magazine:

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/features/crashplan_vs_backblaze_2013

I don't think there is any perfect solution. All you can do is figure out what you're willing to pay vs. what risks you are willing to live with.

Correct. Nothing is 100%. It's what you're comfortable with and how much risk you are willing to take. My back-up solution consists of monthly drive images stored on my multi-terabyte server system. I then have that system backed up to a drive that lives in my fire safe. Each computer in the house has a hard drive image that is generally not older than a month. So in the event I need to perform a restoration, at most I only lose a month of data. Which isn't much at all. It's saved my skin a number of times. All my flash drives are backed up there too. I don't really care for RAID set-ups. They work fine but it gets expensive and there are other things that can go wrong. I prefer drive images over data-mirroring.

Hopefully that gives some additional insight.

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^I keep a backup in the safe deposit box at the bank. I have two external disk drives and swap the latest backup for the one at the bank every so often. To me, cloud storage just means I'm depending on somebody else to maintain the data.

This.

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I store a copy of all our videos on DVD at my parents house. Same for pictures. I need something besides my one HDD serving as my operating and backup drive, though. :unsure:



I've thought about another internal drive to serve as just a backup location as well as an external drive to perform the same service. Pros and cons of each but am still undecided.


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I prefer drive images over data-mirroring.

What software do you use for the drive imaging?

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^I keep a backup in the safe deposit box at the bank. I have two external disk drives and swap the latest backup for the one at the bank every so often. To me, cloud storage just means I'm depending on somebody else to maintain the data.

This.

I don't trust banks. Whoa, I just sounded like CW there. But I actually don't. LOL

I store a copy of all our videos on DVD at my parents house. Same for pictures. I need something besides my one HDD serving as my operating and backup drive, though. :unsure:

I've thought about another internal drive to serve as just a backup location as well as an external drive to perform the same service. Pros and cons of each but am still undecided.

This is a good solution for a RAID setup. You can get the energy efficient (green series) WD 2TB drives relatively cheap. And I believe they carry a 5 year warranty. Perfect candidates for that if you want to go internal and have added protection. Windows 7 and newer is pretty easy for setting up RAID 0 and 1 these days.

I prefer drive images over data-mirroring.

What software do you use for the drive imaging?

For my money, I use Acronis True Image. It's a solid, user-friendly imaging software that I have had no issues with. It also lets you create a bootable disk where you don't need an operating system to utilize the software for back-up/restore operations. That part that is a necessity for me. Especially when trying to recover a failed drive that won't boot anyway. The software allows you to partition and/or format new drives too which is nice. Plus it allows back-ups to network devices, not just local. So I can do back-ups over a gigabit connection to my server and it takes minutes rather than hours. ;) You can usually find the software for a pretty good discount on TigerDirect. And it's usually bundled with something else too.

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I store a copy of all our videos on DVD at my parents house. Same for pictures. I need something besides my one HDD serving as my operating and backup drive, though. :unsure:

I've thought about another internal drive to serve as just a backup location as well as an external drive to perform the same service. Pros and cons of each but am still undecided.

This is a good solution for a RAID setup. You can get the energy efficient (green series) WD 2TB drives relatively cheap. And I believe they carry a 5 year warranty. Perfect candidates for that if you want to go internal and have added protection. Windows 7 and newer is pretty easy for setting up RAID 0 and 1 these days.

Don't have a Windows 7 disc (only XP 32-bit and Vista), using Ubuntu. Except for my need for Windows to run my tax software, I'm 99% sold on Ubuntu.

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I store a copy of all our videos on DVD at my parents house. Same for pictures. I need something besides my one HDD serving as my operating and backup drive, though. :unsure:

I've thought about another internal drive to serve as just a backup location as well as an external drive to perform the same service. Pros and cons of each but am still undecided.

This is a good solution for a RAID setup. You can get the energy efficient (green series) WD 2TB drives relatively cheap. And I believe they carry a 5 year warranty. Perfect candidates for that if you want to go internal and have added protection. Windows 7 and newer is pretty easy for setting up RAID 0 and 1 these days.

Don't have a Windows 7 disc (only XP 32-bit and Vista), using Ubuntu. Except for my need for Windows to run my tax software, I'm 99% sold on Ubuntu.

Linux FTW! Though I haven't played with RAID configs in Linux much. I'm fairly certain it can handle it just fine though. Also, for your tax software, just run a Windows virtual machine within Linux and have the tax software installed there. Problem solved.

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mr snick has to run that virtual machine for work sometimes. He also likes linux


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I've heard that virtual machines are iffy. I'd like to have a dual boot with XP on a very small partition, but I've also read that Windows should be installed first, otherwise there is a lot of headache involved. I'll cross that bridge at a later date.


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KFox,



It is possible to control a GoPro Hero3+ Black Edition with a Kindle Fire?


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KFox,

It is possible to control a GoPro Hero3+ Black Edition with a Kindle Fire?

I believe it would be possible using this according to the app description and info from GoPro.

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