Texas October 2013 PE Results out . How did you do?! - OCT 2013 - Engineer Boards
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Texas October 2013 PE Results out . How did you do?!

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^^^ 96? You apparently studied too much. :-P

Passed.

Electrical (Power). Score: 83.

Actually, might not have to studied much.

I just finished my masters but I passed the Electrical PE with an 88 only having looked at the NEC for a couple of days. If I had taken a prep course like Testmasters or whatever, a score in the 90's would have been pretty easy. I probably would have studied hard if the Texas Board of Engineers still posted the top scores.

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Construction- At 69 :(


Did good on all sections...except water. My analytics shows I did worse in Water 30%. That was the area i think i had put in max effort and looking to gain points. So not sure what went wrong...oops..



Any tips on what reference to use for Water ? My PM is still going to be Construction


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Construction- At 69 :(

Did good on all sections...except water. My analytics shows I did worse in Water 30%. That was the area i think i had put in max effort and looking to gain points. So not sure what went wrong...oops..

Any tips on what reference to use for Water ? My PM is still going to be Construction

The CERM was great, as was my college textbook - Water Resources Engineering 2005 Ed. by Larry W. Mays, Wiley & Sons Publishers. That's a topic I personally feel you gain more from actually doing it in your job. I've been doing 80% drainage design the past year so it was second nature to me, and I'm highway/transportation.

I feel for you, best of luck the second time around! FWIW, I took transportation and I wasn't well prepared for some of the construction questions.

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Passed Mechanical (Thermal/Fluids Systems) with an 84. This was my second time taking it. I wonder why the passing rate for second and third-time test takers gets progressively lower?


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Very Nice that the State of Texas give the passing score even for passing engineers.


I took it in Utah, all it says is Pass, but I will take that without a score any day :)))))


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Failed, Mechanical...61%. Can't say how much I studied, had a major family incident which derailed my studying. Took exam knowing it was a long shot to pass, to get real test experience.

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Passed! Water and Environmental. I almost failed it. I did very well in the morning but badly in the afternoon. The lesson here is not to take water in the afternoon. My advice is take construction or transportation instead. I used Goswami all in one and did all the 6 minute books morning questions. I did'nt study or open the CERN book but it was very helpful as a dictionary during the test. I probably scored 35 in the morning but less than 20 in the afternoon. Anyway if you fail, just try again and take my advice. Do as many morning problems as you can and don't take water in the afternoon.


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ACtually i didnt go to testmasters or any prep course. I wouldnt recommend that as at the end of the day you still have to study and be prepared. studied for 3 months and got very familiar with lindeburg. I think thats the key


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Passed! Water and Environmental. I almost failed it. I did very well in the morning but badly in the afternoon. The lesson here is not to take water in the afternoon. My advice is take construction or transportation instead. I used Goswami all in one and did all the 6 minute books morning questions. I did'nt study or open the CERN book but it was very helpful as a dictionary during the test. I probably scored 35 in the morning but less than 20 in the afternoon. Anyway if you fail, just try again and take my advice. Do as many morning problems as you can and don't take water in the afternoon.

I am waiting on NJ results. I took too WR&E, third time at it for that matter. I feel the same way as you; rocked the morning but had trouble with some of the afternoon topics. I walked out of the exam thinking I passed, but it would be close. I estimate that I scored somewhere between a 35 and a 37 in the AM and 20-25 in the PM. Hopefully it is enough.

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Passed! Water and Environmental. I almost failed it. I did very well in the morning but badly in the afternoon. The lesson here is not to take water in the afternoon. My advice is take construction or transportation instead. I used Goswami all in one and did all the 6 minute books morning questions. I did'nt study or open the CERN book but it was very helpful as a dictionary during the test. I probably scored 35 in the morning but less than 20 in the afternoon. Anyway if you fail, just try again and take my advice. Do as many morning problems as you can and don't take water in the afternoon.

I am waiting on NJ results. I took too WR&E, third time at it for that matter. I feel the same way as you; rocked the morning but had trouble with some of the afternoon topics. I walked out of the exam thinking I passed, but it would be close. I estimate that I scored somewhere between a 35 and a 37 in the AM and 20-25 in the PM. Hopefully it is enough.

Is the WR&E really that hard? I've been debating whether to take the civil wr&e or the environmental.

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for me personally it is a matter environmental topics. I work for an engineering firm where our primary design work has to do with stormwater management, some water distribution and sanitary sewer designs. So I got the first half that is WR. Its the BODs, and water chemistry and those type of topics that I just don't handle well. This better explains why I think I scored around 50% in the Pm, and have historically over the previous two exams.


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for me personally it is a matter environmental topics. I work for an engineering firm where our primary design work has to do with stormwater management, some water distribution and sanitary sewer designs. So I got the first half that is WR. Its the BODs, and water chemistry and those type of topics that I just don't handle well. This better explains why I think I scored around 50% in the Pm, and have historically over the previous two exams.

I see. Hopefully you get your passing results tomorrow.

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Passed! Water Resources and Environmental. Made a 74. I knew it could go either way. I felt pretty good about the AM test, but I had to guess on several in the PM.


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Passed!  Water Resources and Environmental.  Made a 74.  I knew it could go either way.  I felt pretty good about the AM test, but I had to guess on several in the PM. 

I have heard many say the same thing and this just continues to make me feel good about my results to come.

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Passed! Water and Environmental. I almost failed it. I did very well in the morning but badly in the afternoon. The lesson here is not to take water in the afternoon. My advice is take construction or transportation instead. I used Goswami all in one and did all the 6 minute books morning questions. I did'nt study or open the CERN book but it was very helpful as a dictionary during the test. I probably scored 35 in the morning but less than 20 in the afternoon. Anyway if you fail, just try again and take my advice. Do as many morning problems as you can and don't take water in the afternoon.

I am waiting on NJ results. I took too WR&E, third time at it for that matter. I feel the same way as you; rocked the morning but had trouble with some of the afternoon topics. I walked out of the exam thinking I passed, but it would be close. I estimate that I scored somewhere between a 35 and a 37 in the AM and 20-25 in the PM. Hopefully it is enough.

Is the WR&E really that hard? I've been debating whether to take the civil wr&e or the environmental.

Passed! Water and Environmental. I almost failed it. I did very well in the morning but badly in the afternoon. The lesson here is not to take water in the afternoon. My advice is take construction or transportation instead. I used Goswami all in one and did all the 6 minute books morning questions. I did'nt study or open the CERN book but it was very helpful as a dictionary during the test. I probably scored 35 in the morning but less than 20 in the afternoon. Anyway if you fail, just try again and take my advice. Do as many morning problems as you can and don't take water in the afternoon.

I am waiting on NJ results. I took too WR&E, third time at it for that matter. I feel the same way as you; rocked the morning but had trouble with some of the afternoon topics. I walked out of the exam thinking I passed, but it would be close. I estimate that I scored somewhere between a 35 and a 37 in the AM and 20-25 in the PM. Hopefully it is enough.

Is the WR&E really that hard? I've been debating whether to take the civil wr&e or the environmental.

Similar experience here. I felt like I only missed 2 or 3 in the morning, but flat out guessed on 6 or 7 in the afternoon, and an additional 10 that I knew the process, but wasn't absolutely confident in my answer. I feel like I might have passed, but it's going to be REALLY close. I do a lot of water distribution (pumps, pipes, and tanks), and a little bit of environmental work (monitoring and statistics). For the test, you need to know hydrology, open channels (know culverts in and out), water treatment, waste water treatment, water distribution, groundwater, and there were even a couple of toxicology questions. In my opinion, it seems like the WRE test has the most material that needs to be covered. That being said, it's really important to take what you are most familiar with regardless of the amount of material covered. You'll get a few questions simply from experience, but I know a few engineers that ONLY do hydrology, and they are really strong engineers in their focus, but will really struggle with a lot of the material.

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Passed! Water and Environmental. I almost failed it. I did very well in the morning but badly in the afternoon. The lesson here is not to take water in the afternoon. My advice is take construction or transportation instead. I used Goswami all in one and did all the 6 minute books morning questions. I did'nt study or open the CERN book but it was very helpful as a dictionary during the test. I probably scored 35 in the morning but less than 20 in the afternoon. Anyway if you fail, just try again and take my advice. Do as many morning problems as you can and don't take water in the afternoon.

I am waiting on NJ results. I took too WR&E, third time at it for that matter. I feel the same way as you; rocked the morning but had trouble with some of the afternoon topics. I walked out of the exam thinking I passed, but it would be close. I estimate that I scored somewhere between a 35 and a 37 in the AM and 20-25 in the PM. Hopefully it is enough.

Is the WR&E really that hard? I've been debating whether to take the civil wr&e or the environmental.

Passed! Water and Environmental. I almost failed it. I did very well in the morning but badly in the afternoon. The lesson here is not to take water in the afternoon. My advice is take construction or transportation instead. I used Goswami all in one and did all the 6 minute books morning questions. I did'nt study or open the CERN book but it was very helpful as a dictionary during the test. I probably scored 35 in the morning but less than 20 in the afternoon. Anyway if you fail, just try again and take my advice. Do as many morning problems as you can and don't take water in the afternoon.

I am waiting on NJ results. I took too WR&E, third time at it for that matter. I feel the same way as you; rocked the morning but had trouble with some of the afternoon topics. I walked out of the exam thinking I passed, but it would be close. I estimate that I scored somewhere between a 35 and a 37 in the AM and 20-25 in the PM. Hopefully it is enough.

Is the WR&E really that hard? I've been debating whether to take the civil wr&e or the environmental.

Similar experience here. I felt like I only missed 2 or 3 in the morning, but flat out guessed on 6 or 7 in the afternoon, and an additional 10 that I knew the process, but wasn't absolutely confident in my answer. I feel like I might have passed, but it's going to be REALLY close. I do a lot of water distribution (pumps, pipes, and tanks), and a little bit of environmental work (monitoring and statistics). For the test, you need to know hydrology, open channels (know culverts in and out), water treatment, waste water treatment, water distribution, groundwater, and there were even a couple of toxicology questions. In my opinion, it seems like the WRE test has the most material that needs to be covered. That being said, it's really important to take what you are most familiar with regardless of the amount of material covered. You'll get a few questions simply from experience, but I know a few engineers that ONLY do hydrology, and they are really strong engineers in their focus, but will really struggle with a lot of the material.

I only do hydrology and hydraulics at my work. Like everyone said, AM was easy but the PM portion was really hard. Half of the PM test was stuff that I'm not familiar with.

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Passed! Water and Environmental. I almost failed it. I did very well in the morning but badly in the afternoon. The lesson here is not to take water in the afternoon. My advice is take construction or transportation instead. I used Goswami all in one and did all the 6 minute books morning questions. I did'nt study or open the CERN book but it was very helpful as a dictionary during the test. I probably scored 35 in the morning but less than 20 in the afternoon. Anyway if you fail, just try again and take my advice. Do as many morning problems as you can and don't take water in the afternoon.

I am waiting on NJ results. I took too WR&E, third time at it for that matter. I feel the same way as you; rocked the morning but had trouble with some of the afternoon topics. I walked out of the exam thinking I passed, but it would be close. I estimate that I scored somewhere between a 35 and a 37 in the AM and 20-25 in the PM. Hopefully it is enough.

Is the WR&E really that hard? I've been debating whether to take the civil wr&e or the environmental.

Passed! Water and Environmental. I almost failed it. I did very well in the morning but badly in the afternoon. The lesson here is not to take water in the afternoon. My advice is take construction or transportation instead. I used Goswami all in one and did all the 6 minute books morning questions. I did'nt study or open the CERN book but it was very helpful as a dictionary during the test. I probably scored 35 in the morning but less than 20 in the afternoon. Anyway if you fail, just try again and take my advice. Do as many morning problems as you can and don't take water in the afternoon.

I am waiting on NJ results. I took too WR&E, third time at it for that matter. I feel the same way as you; rocked the morning but had trouble with some of the afternoon topics. I walked out of the exam thinking I passed, but it would be close. I estimate that I scored somewhere between a 35 and a 37 in the AM and 20-25 in the PM. Hopefully it is enough.

Is the WR&E really that hard? I've been debating whether to take the civil wr&e or the environmental.

Similar experience here. I felt like I only missed 2 or 3 in the morning, but flat out guessed on 6 or 7 in the afternoon, and an additional 10 that I knew the process, but wasn't absolutely confident in my answer. I feel like I might have passed, but it's going to be REALLY close. I do a lot of water distribution (pumps, pipes, and tanks), and a little bit of environmental work (monitoring and statistics). For the test, you need to know hydrology, open channels (know culverts in and out), water treatment, waste water treatment, water distribution, groundwater, and there were even a couple of toxicology questions. In my opinion, it seems like the WRE test has the most material that needs to be covered. That being said, it's really important to take what you are most familiar with regardless of the amount of material covered. You'll get a few questions simply from experience, but I know a few engineers that ONLY do hydrology, and they are really strong engineers in their focus, but will really struggle with a lot of the material.

I only do hydrology and hydraulics at my work. Like everyone said, AM was easy but the PM portion was really hard. Half of the PM test was stuff that I'm not familiar with.

how did you do?

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for me personally it is a matter environmental topics. I work for an engineering firm where our primary design work has to do with stormwater management, some water distribution and sanitary sewer designs. So I got the first half that is WR. Its the BODs, and water chemistry and those type of topics that I just don't handle well. This better explains why I think I scored around 50% in the Pm, and have historically over the previous two exams.

I wish I had my results and knew if I passed before I comment...but, shoot, I'll throw in my two cents anyway on the off chance that anybody's about to start their review and is worried about it. The problem with the environmental problems is that they cover a huge subject area, and are often written specifically to overwhelm the user with information. I feel like to the average test taker, when encountered with an environmental problem, your first instinct is "Wow- I have no clue where to start" and you start flipping through the CERM hoping there's a formula that has most of the information.

But the thing is...for most of these problems, you don't even need the CERM. With perhaps a couple exceptions, the environmental problems are all mass balance/unit conversion questions. You can get misled into thinking it's more complicated when you see chemical equations, pH levels and big words like "Mixed Liquor Volatile Suspended Solids," but if you changed those same words to "apples and oranges" and were asked to find the proportion of apples to oranges after mixing them together, suddenly it's a much easier problem. I think that's the tradeoff the exam writers made. They know that nobody can become a wastewater expert in two months, so they just make them challenging math problems with wastewater vernacular.

The CERM provides a LOT of equations, which I think is in some ways a bad thing, because it makes you depend on them if you're not familiar...but (again with a couple exceptions), many of these formulas are very easily derived, and if you just followed the unit conversion through your problem, you'd arrive at the same result. Even the magic "8.35" mg/L->lb/MG conversion is unnecessary, it's possible to just convert units on the fly.

When working the NCEES practice problems, I found that a couple of the solutions were really badly written for me to understand because they took shortcuts. Instead, I had to solve them with my own method (following logical unit conversions/mass balance) and I was much more comfortable with the result. So, the best strategy is not to review environmental textbooks or read the CERM section over and over. Rather it's to work problems over and over, and instead of trying to mimic the given solution which usually uses a shortcut formula, try to find the solution logically by balancing mass and converting units.

Anyway, hopefully I passed...but even if I didn't, I don't think my strategy for enviro will change the next time around.

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for me personally it is a matter environmental topics. I work for an engineering firm where our primary design work has to do with stormwater management, some water distribution and sanitary sewer designs. So I got the first half that is WR. Its the BODs, and water chemistry and those type of topics that I just don't handle well. This better explains why I think I scored around 50% in the Pm, and have historically over the previous two exams.

I wish I had my results and knew if I passed before I comment...but, shoot, I'll throw in my two cents anyway on the off chance that anybody's about to start their review and is worried about it. The problem with the environmental problems is that they cover a huge subject area, and are often written specifically to overwhelm the user with information. I feel like to the average test taker, when encountered with an environmental problem, your first instinct is "Wow- I have no clue where to start" and you start flipping through the CERM hoping there's a formula that has most of the information.

But the thing is...for most of these problems, you don't even need the CERM. With perhaps a couple exceptions, the environmental problems are all mass balance/unit conversion questions. You can get misled into thinking it's more complicated when you see chemical equations, pH levels and big words like "Mixed Liquor Volatile Suspended Solids," but if you changed those same words to "apples and oranges" and were asked to find the proportion of apples to oranges after mixing them together, suddenly it's a much easier problem. I think that's the tradeoff the exam writers made. They know that nobody can become a wastewater expert in two months, so they just make them challenging math problems with wastewater vernacular.

The CERM provides a LOT of equations, which I think is in some ways a bad thing, because it makes you depend on them if you're not familiar...but (again with a couple exceptions), many of these formulas are very easily derived, and if you just followed the unit conversion through your problem, you'd arrive at the same result. Even the magic "8.35" mg/L->lb/MG conversion is unnecessary, it's possible to just convert units on the fly.

When working the NCEES practice problems, I found that a couple of the solutions were really badly written for me to understand because they took shortcuts. Instead, I had to solve them with my own method (following logical unit conversions/mass balance) and I was much more comfortable with the result. So, the best strategy is not to review environmental textbooks or read the CERM section over and over. Rather it's to work problems over and over, and instead of trying to mimic the given solution which usually uses a shortcut formula, try to find the solution logically by balancing mass and converting units.

Anyway, hopefully I passed...but even if I didn't, I don't think my strategy for enviro will change the next time around.

This level of difficulty, as I understand it, is true no matter what your afternoon discipline is. The material is relatively simple if you're able to suss out the important and unimportant information. And, frankly, a good engineer ought to be able to do just that. This exam is not required to test whether you can solve for a moment given all the appropriate assumptions, or perform a unit conversion given that direct request, or volumetric flow rate given a flow speed and pipe area... it's a test of whether you can apply discipline-specific engineering judgement to solve extremely simple problems (they are 6-minute problems afterall). If you did not pass, don't stress too much. You are all capable of it with the proper amount of studying. A lot of the studying benefits are derived from just learning the way the test works, how the questions are typically phrased, etc. So keep at it and you'll be alright. Don't make it bigger than it is. Afterall, there are a TON of PEs out there. It can't be that hard, right?

Maybe it won't happen your first time. That just means you need to study a bit more. The time you take doing that now will be trivial when you look back. So to the folks that are done -- congrats. To the folks needing to re-test. Go at it twice as hard and make sure you're not in this position again in 6 months. We're all gonna make it :)

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I only do hydrology and hydraulics at my work. Like everyone said, AM was easy but the PM portion was really hard. Half of the PM test was stuff that I'm not familiar with.

how did you do?

I don't know yet. I'm actually in Alabama, waiting for the snail mail. I'm on this Texas thread because I'm dying to find hints of the passing score, haha

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for me personally it is a matter environmental topics. I work for an engineering firm where our primary design work has to do with stormwater management, some water distribution and sanitary sewer designs. So I got the first half that is WR. Its the BODs, and water chemistry and those type of topics that I just don't handle well. This better explains why I think I scored around 50% in the Pm, and have historically over the previous two exams.

I wish I had my results and knew if I passed before I comment...but, shoot, I'll throw in my two cents anyway on the off chance that anybody's about to start their review and is worried about it. The problem with the environmental problems is that they cover a huge subject area, and are often written specifically to overwhelm the user with information. I feel like to the average test taker, when encountered with an environmental problem, your first instinct is "Wow- I have no clue where to start" and you start flipping through the CERM hoping there's a formula that has most of the information.

But the thing is...for most of these problems, you don't even need the CERM. With perhaps a couple exceptions, the environmental problems are all mass balance/unit conversion questions. You can get misled into thinking it's more complicated when you see chemical equations, pH levels and big words like "Mixed Liquor Volatile Suspended Solids," but if you changed those same words to "apples and oranges" and were asked to find the proportion of apples to oranges after mixing them together, suddenly it's a much easier problem. I think that's the tradeoff the exam writers made. They know that nobody can become a wastewater expert in two months, so they just make them challenging math problems with wastewater vernacular.

The CERM provides a LOT of equations, which I think is in some ways a bad thing, because it makes you depend on them if you're not familiar...but (again with a couple exceptions), many of these formulas are very easily derived, and if you just followed the unit conversion through your problem, you'd arrive at the same result. Even the magic "8.35" mg/L->lb/MG conversion is unnecessary, it's possible to just convert units on the fly.

When working the NCEES practice problems, I found that a couple of the solutions were really badly written for me to understand because they took shortcuts. Instead, I had to solve them with my own method (following logical unit conversions/mass balance) and I was much more comfortable with the result. So, the best strategy is not to review environmental textbooks or read the CERM section over and over. Rather it's to work problems over and over, and instead of trying to mimic the given solution which usually uses a shortcut formula, try to find the solution logically by balancing mass and converting units.

Anyway, hopefully I passed...but even if I didn't, I don't think my strategy for enviro will change the next time around.

This level of difficulty, as I understand it, is true no matter what your afternoon discipline is. The material is relatively simple if you're able to suss out the important and unimportant information. And, frankly, a good engineer ought to be able to do just that. This exam is not required to test whether you can solve for a moment given all the appropriate assumptions, or perform a unit conversion given that direct request, or volumetric flow rate given a flow speed and pipe area... it's a test of whether you can apply discipline-specific engineering judgement to solve extremely simple problems (they are 6-minute problems afterall). If you did not pass, don't stress too much. You are all capable of it with the proper amount of studying. A lot of the studying benefits are derived from just learning the way the test works, how the questions are typically phrased, etc. So keep at it and you'll be alright. Don't make it bigger than it is. Afterall, there are a TON of PEs out there. It can't be that hard, right?

Maybe it won't happen your first time. That just means you need to study a bit more. The time you take doing that now will be trivial when you look back. So to the folks that are done -- congrats. To the folks needing to re-test. Go at it twice as hard and make sure you're not in this position again in 6 months. We're all gonna make it :)

Good thoughts. I was fortunate enough to pass my first try this December, but if I failed I was prepared to go at it and study harder. You are defined by how you respond to failure not how you respond to success, and I was going to take that thought and use it to motivate me the next go round. I am going to take the SE next testing period because I do not think a PE license necessarily validates my expertise in structural engineering.

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Failed, Mechanical...61%. Can't say how much I studied, had a major family incident which derailed my studying. Took exam knowing it was a long shot to pass, to get real test experience.

SMott, I have been following your circumstances and indeed you shouldnt worry about it as you give a special priority to your family first..having said that I am hoping that you will make it on your second round...btw...would you mind to share us the # of items from each portions from your diagnosis report without showing your performance....I was just curious how many problems are covered from each portions on the exam and wanted to predict my performance until I hear my results......thanks!

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I only do hydrology and hydraulics at my work. Like everyone said, AM was easy but the PM portion was really hard. Half of the PM test was stuff that I'm not familiar with.

how did you do?

I don't know yet. I'm actually in Alabama, waiting for the snail mail. I'm on this Texas thread because I'm dying to find hints of the passing score, haha

Got the letter yesterday, I passed!

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