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Road Guy

camping / backpacking thread...

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I've been on sections in NY that were basically level, sections in VT and NH that were rolling, and sections in TN and VA that were pretty rugged. With a trail that big, you get it all.

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The AT along the NC/TN border in the Smokies.

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The AT in the Shenandoahs at sunset.

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I want to do the smokies but they require you to only camp at shelters and I cant bring my dog $500 fine....

If I have a group of kids with me sometimes I have heard there are lots of weirdos at the shelters sometimes...

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I've rarely run into too many weirdos in the backcountry. Most folks I've met are friendly as can be.

The National Parks are awesome, but they are not at all pet friendly. They don't want your dog there because of the possibility of them tearing up a fragile landscape or getting into it with another animal. Oh well.

The only real oddball I ran into while hiking was when I went to Lake Solitude in the Tetons. The guy was butt naked save for a pair of hiking boots.

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from people are telling me is that during the summer and close to weekends the shelters get full in the areas that are close to major destinations (Easy road access) .. getting some feedback that its not always something pleasant to be around, would prefer to be able to stay in shelters mid week with less people and then be able to tent the other nights, I think it would be good for the boys to be able to do their own thing.. Ive been watching some of the youtube videos people have shot of themselves doing thru hikes and some of those people they "run into" in the shelters look & sound pretty rough (and im not talking about looking rough from not shaving in 2 months due to hiking), Im sure some of them are great people though..

I just dont like the thought of "having" to stay at the shelters or having to tent it out right next to the shelters.. I want the kids to have fun, they will be tired from backpacking, but If they want to goof off around the campfire at the night I want them to be able to do that without disturbing some hippie prood...

The smokies has the no dog rule due to bears, understable, but most other NPS allow dogs..the AT shouldnt be any different than any other NPS property...plus I already got the border collie her backpack! The Kennesaw Mountain NPS property near me has a section for horses... those things do some serious damage to the trail...

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The smokies has the no dog rule due to bears, understable, but most other NPS allow dogs..the AT shouldnt be any different than any other NPS property...

I've been to a bunch of National Parks as the regulars here know. The only one I ever took a dog to was Acadia, because it was the only one I've driven to. (And a mega-disappointment I might add.) Acadia is different because towns run through it and it's well developed and no one cared if I let my dogs in the ocean. The other 22 I've been to were all off-limits about dogs in the backcountry.

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VT, check this out and tell me you wouldnt want to do this with a mutt!

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I've rarely run into too many weirdos in the backcountry.

How would know if/when you do?

The only real oddball I ran into while hiking was when I went to Lake Solitude in the Tetons. The guy was butt naked save for a pair of hiking boots.

Then did you walk away from the mirror and put some clothes on?

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VT, check this out and tell me you wouldnt want to do this with a mutt!

[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lif6o8iE5cA&playnext=1&list=PL3AB8A5503D5C1684&feature=results_video

Oh man that stuff on the NH/ME line brings back some memories. The Presidential Range has some awesome hiking and insane weather. I'd love to do that with my dog, and if I didn't have a Lab I'd have a Vizsla like that dude. All I was trying to say is that the Natl Park Service are assholes with their dog policies.

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VT, check this out and tell me you wouldnt want to do this with a mutt!

I love the George P. Burdell reference at the 9:14 mark.

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Speaking of the PCT, I read "Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Coast Trail" by Cheryl Strayed (http://www.amazon.com/Wild-Found-Pacific-Crest-Oprahs/dp/0307592731)

First: Give me a break for reading a "chick book"... I was on deployment and bored! At least I didn't stoop to 50 Shades of Gray.

Second: It's an interesting story, as much for the insight into human failings as anything else.

Third: If anyone wants to try the PCT and makes it as far as Angeles National Forest, let me know. I'd be happy to drop off some beer for the last push!

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RW- I tried to explain the Burdell reference to no luck with my wife when we found this video...even though I didnt go to GT, my grandfather used to tell me about the Burdell stuff "back in the day"

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The smokies has the no dog rule due to bears, understable, but most other NPS allow dogs..the AT shouldnt be any different than any other NPS property...

I've been to a bunch of National Parks as the regulars here know. The only one I ever took a dog to was Acadia, because it was the only one I've driven to. (And a mega-disappointment I might add.) Acadia is different because towns run through it and it's well developed and no one cared if I let my dogs in the ocean. The other 22 I've been to were all off-limits about dogs in the backcountry.

Yeah, I was always under the impression that dogs aren't allowed at any National Parks, outside of the paved roads and the developed campgrounds.

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There are a lot of reasons why the national parks don't want you to bring your dogs, they aren't trying to be a-holes.

side note, that is an awesome doggie backpack, it looks like it would hold way more stuff than the one I have for mine holds.

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I take my dog on trail runs at the Kennessaw Mountain National Park (NPS) about 3-4 times a week, there not "dis-allowed"....I dont really see any difference between one NPS and another....She also never shits on the trail ;)

But the only section of the AT that you cannot bring your dog is the section through the Great Smokey Mountains.. its okay though, we will get over it...

I think this is a good time to go on one of my anti NEPA NPS rants!.....:D

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I spent a week in the Moab, UT area after Thanksgiving and it was awesome. We spent three days on the 77-mile White Rim trail in Canyonlands National Park, bicycling, off-roading and camping. I highly recommend it. On a bicycle you're completely immersed in the views. This time of year was a bit cool overnight (temps in the mid 20s) but perfect during the day for riding (highs in the mid-50s) and the park was not busy at all (on the second day we saw three motorcycles and a car on the trail, and the third day we saw no one outside of our own group).

We also did the Elephant Hill off-road trail at the Needles district of Canyonlands, which was fun. They bill it as "the most difficult off-road trail in Utah", which I doubt, but it was challenging.

We did some hiking at Arches National Park as well, which was fine, but I was much more impressed by Canyonlands and spent another day hiking alone at Island in the Sky.

In any case, Moab is awesome for anyone into the outdoors. I already want to go back, and next time I want to take an air tour of the parks and do some kayaking on the Colorado river. I also would like to do some hiking at Needles and check out the Maze district.

But first, I'm planning a week-long camping trip to Yellowstone and Grand Tetons in early June. I'm planning to fly into Denver and drive up to the park with some friends, then fly out of Jackson Hole the following weekend.

I've never been to Wyoming before; anyone have tips/ideas? We're in the early planning stages now, mostly trying to pick where to camp.

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This time of year was a bit cool overnight (temps in the mid 20s) but perfect during the day for riding (highs in the mid-50s) and the park was not busy at all (on the second day we saw three motorcycles and a car on the trail, and the third day we saw no one outside of our own group).

As someone from SC, I call this f@#kin' freezing!

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But first, I'm planning a week-long camping trip to Yellowstone and Grand Tetons in early June. I'm planning to fly into Denver and drive up to the park with some friends, then fly out of Jackson Hole the following weekend.

I've never been to Wyoming before; anyone have tips/ideas? We're in the early planning stages now, mostly trying to pick where to camp.

I've been to both multiple times. I'm going to PM you.

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I spent a week in the Moab, UT area after Thanksgiving and it was awesome. We spent three days on the 77-mile White Rim trail in Canyonlands National Park, bicycling, off-roading and camping. I highly recommend it. On a bicycle you're completely immersed in the views. This time of year was a bit cool overnight (temps in the mid 20s) but perfect during the day for riding (highs in the mid-50s) and the park was not busy at all (on the second day we saw three motorcycles and a car on the trail, and the third day we saw no one outside of our own group).

We also did the Elephant Hill off-road trail at the Needles district of Canyonlands, which was fun. They bill it as "the most difficult off-road trail in Utah", which I doubt, but it was challenging.

We did some hiking at Arches National Park as well, which was fine, but I was much more impressed by Canyonlands and spent another day hiking alone at Island in the Sky.

In any case, Moab is awesome for anyone into the outdoors. I already want to go back, and next time I want to take an air tour of the parks and do some kayaking on the Colorado river. I also would like to do some hiking at Needles and check out the Maze district.

But first, I'm planning a week-long camping trip to Yellowstone and Grand Tetons in early June. I'm planning to fly into Denver and drive up to the park with some friends, then fly out of Jackson Hole the following weekend.

I've never been to Wyoming before; anyone have tips/ideas? We're in the early planning stages now, mostly trying to pick where to camp.

There are multiple ways to drive to the parks, each one having it's benefits.

1. Straight up I-25, over to US14. Absolutely beautiful view of the Big Horn Mountains over 14. Probably the longest route.

2. West on I-80, turning north at Rock Springs towards Pinedale on towards Jackson. Things get scenic past Rock Springs. This puts you at Grand Teton first.

3. West on I-80, north at Rawlins, through Lander, on up to Dubois, launches you in north of Teton, south of Yellowstone. Beautiful country starting at Lander.

Definitely be sure to stop and sample the local fare. I have restaurant recommendations for any of those routes.

I'm sure you must own a National Parks Pass by now.

There is a lot of camping around and in Yellowstone. Make sure to get reservations for in Yellowstone. I've also camped just outside of Yellowstone at Pahaska Teepee.

Depending on your route, there are cheaper places to load up on food. Cody will be cheaper than Jackson. However, Jackson will for sure have all the organic things you could wish for to eat.

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CSB, Google maps wants us to take I-25 to US-26 to hwy 120 to US-14, what do you think about that routing? I was thinking we'd go in the east end of the park since we'll be exiting the south side to go to Tetons. Big Horn does sound kind of cool, though. Maybe we could drive up that way and stay in Cody the first night.

Our plan right now is to make reservations for camping in the park, but then hope we can find an open spot in one of the first-come, first-served rustic campgrounds because the reservable campgrounds are huge and not really our style. Since we're going earlier in June I'm hoping the place isn't overrun with tourists yet.

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This time of year was a bit cool overnight (temps in the mid 20s) but perfect during the day for riding (highs in the mid-50s) and the park was not busy at all (on the second day we saw three motorcycles and a car on the trail, and the third day we saw no one outside of our own group).

As someone from SC, I call this f@#kin' freezing!

Funny thing is the only time I've been to SC it was in April and they were having record low temperatures. We were camping there with lows in the low 30s.

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CSB, Google maps wants us to take I-25 to US-26 to hwy 120 to US-14, what do you think about that routing? I was thinking we'd go in the east end of the park since we'll be exiting the south side to go to Tetons. Big Horn does sound kind of cool, though. Maybe we could drive up that way and stay in Cody the first night.

Our plan right now is to make reservations for camping in the park, but then hope we can find an open spot in one of the first-come, first-served rustic campgrounds because the reservable campgrounds are huge and not really our style. Since we're going earlier in June I'm hoping the place isn't overrun with tourists yet.

Ah, you will notice CSB didn't take you that way. So Google Maps is spot on and that will get you to Yellowstone and it's the fastest way. However, the stretch of road from Casper to Shoshoni ( the US26 part) can feel tortuously long. It's pretty barren, can be full of trucks (well, Wyoming full), and there's NOTHING between Casper and Shoshoni. Well, there's a rest area, two very small towns (4 people in one, 16? in the other), and then a whole lot of nothing. Hell's Half Acre, where Starship Troopers was filmed, is out there, but you'll be able to see it on the way by. Used to be Shoshoni had a fabulous malt shop, but it closed down.

All that said, it's the fastest way. You're really trying to get to Yellowstone, versus exploring all of Wyoming. The Big Horn route will add about an hour. You're looking at a 10 hour day as is, so it might be wise to plan a hotel stay anyway. And, the drive probably is not as bad as I think it is...but I will say I try to avoid that route when I travel.

I'm right there with you on the rustic campgrounds, as we stayed outside of the East Entrance in Shoshone NF. You'll miss some of the crowds for sure. If we ever get snow, you might still have it on the ground when you come!

And I'll be there with my in-laws later in June...sure you don't want in on that funorama?

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I've got the packs loaded taking the kids to put some miles on the AT today.,, it's supposed to be low of 50 tonight!

Hope no one else has the same idea and the stover creek shelter isn't packed!

Hope there is no 3G coverage also but if there is ill post am update..,

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