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njarcheng

No Studying

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well, I can honestly say that I count my study time in weeks not hours or days. I have never been very fast at math, not saying I get it wrong, just takes me longer to get there. Those that can crunch numbers in your head, bless you, you have a gift that you should never squander.

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Hi

Has anyone ever heard of anyone passing the exam with no studying?

just curious

I passed my GMAT, GRE, FE, and LEEDS Green Assoc. exams with flying colors and never cracked a book. That said, I would not have attempted that on the PE and I don't think I'd have fared well if I'd tried.

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I took the Civil/Construction Oct 2010.

Its been 22 years since I passed the FE

I can honestly say that I only needed a little review for the afternoon session. A lot of what was there is stuff I do on a daily basis.

I crammed the week before, but I studied topics like moment distributions and there were no such problems on the exam. If I had studied my geometric layouts (curves) a little better I would have walked out a little more confident.

My advice, for both the FE and PE is to know your Economics cold. Make sure you can answer some elementary open channel and fluid mechanic questions. And take a lot of sample exams. Spend time READING the text and concepts of you reference manuals, don't fret on problem solving.

I hope this helps someone be confident to take the test. If I can pass, anyone can.

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I can honestly say that I only needed a little review for the afternoon session. A lot of what was there is stuff I do on a daily basis.

That's the problem. In most cases this is not stuff people do on a daily basis. It certainly wasn't for me. Most people don't pass without studying. Everybody needs to carefully assess their own situation.

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My boss once told me the story of his FE experience. My Boss was seated next to a guy that took one look at the scantron form and stated several explitives and then asked if he had to solve all these problems. Upon hearing that the did, he quickly, randomally filled out his form, turned it in within 20 minutes and headed to the nearest bar. He returned for the afternoon section smelling of alcohol, and loudly proclaimed that he was "going for the record" for quickest test taking. And again, randomly filled circles without reading a problem and turned in the exam within 20 minutes.

He passed. My boss did not.

I needed to study for the PE. I'm still waiting on results, but either way, I can't imagine putting in less hours for myself. I walked very grateful of every minute spent with the books open, especially for the AM section.

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I studied maybe all of 40 hours for the ChemE PE and passed. If I actually did any chemical engineering at my job maybe I wouldn't have had to study.

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lots of chem Es this time through.

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I took the chemical exam cold my first time this fall. I didn't have the time to study that I had planned. I tried to reschedule but missed the cancellation date. I figured I would take it and at least get a better hope for spring. I've done more mechanical and electrical since graduating so none of it was fresh. Don't know my results yet though since Ga is not as quick

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I took the civil-geotech. I was too busy to study until the last 4 weeks leading up to the exam. i spent 4 saturdays (about 5 hours each day) studying. My "studying" invloved nothing but working practice problems and tabbing references as I saw fit. I passed on my first try this fall. Another guy I graduated with did the same thing for civil-structural and passed as well.

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I took the civil-geotech. I was too busy to study until the last 4 weeks leading up to the exam. i spent 4 saturdays (about 5 hours each day) studying. My "studying" invloved nothing but working practice problems and tabbing references as I saw fit. I passed on my first try this fall. Another guy I graduated with did the same thing for civil-structural and passed as well.

also, forgot to mention, we graduated with 2 others who were in a similar boat in terms of studying, and they weren't as fortunate. i just think it comes down to how well you take tests, not necessarily your engineering acumen, but others may disagree.

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I took the chemical exam cold my first time this fall. I didn't have the time to study that I had planned. I tried to reschedule but missed the cancellation date. I figured I would take it and at least get a better hope for spring. I've done more mechanical and electrical since graduating so none of it was fresh. Don't know my results yet though since Ga is not as quick

I hope you passed!

Happy New Year!

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i passed the 8 hour ncees exam with construction depth with about 4 hours of tabbing and and reviewing practice problems. Passed CA state specific surveying for PE without sudying, had to study for CA seismic this time around

Edited by steveno_3

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I studied about 25 hours the first time I took it and failed. I probably studied another 10-15 hours for the 2nd exam and passed.

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I took the civil-geotech. I was too busy to study until the last 4 weeks leading up to the exam. i spent 4 saturdays (about 5 hours each day) studying. My "studying" invloved nothing but working practice problems and tabbing references as I saw fit. I passed on my first try this fall. Another guy I graduated with did the same thing for civil-structural and passed as well.

also, forgot to mention, we graduated with 2 others who were in a similar boat in terms of studying, and they weren't as fortunate. i just think it comes down to how well you take tests, not necessarily your engineering acumen, but others may disagree.

One's ability as a test-taker has to be a factor. I've always been a good test-taker, and hope it helped here as well (I'm still waiting on results). I also studied about 200 hours. (Wow.... I really hope I didn't fail after having made these claims)

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I studied maybe 20 hours. One solid day and then an hour here and there for a couple weeks. My degree was in Civil Structural and I took a lot of hydro courses, but I work for a construction company, so I was solid on the structural, construction, and hydraulic components. The rest I just tabbed in the study guide and hoped for the best. It worked, but I'm a decent multiple choice guesser anyways. I really struggled on the environmental and traffic questions.

I took the Civil Construction.

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If you had recently finished graduate school, you could get by with minimal studying...maybe one or two practice tests. I wouldn't try it without taking at least one practice test.

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I took the FE exam a year after school and passed after studying for just one day. I did not have the same hubris for the PE. I gave myself 2 months of studying to prepare. I am fairly certain I passed, we shall see.

Well...did you pass???

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i studied probably 100 hrs total for the petroleum exam this fall and passed w/ an 86 (i'm in texas and they give a score).

i did a 40 hr review course + about 40 hrs studying at nights (as my kids allowed) + 20 hrs on the last 2 weekends trying to simulate taking a test.

my degree is in mechanical, and my primary discipline is drilling engineering (specifically offshore & deepwater), so there was a fair bit of material i had to learn just for the exam around reservoir engineering, and some land-specific production techniques.

i don't see any way someone could take the petroleum exam cold w/ no preparation and pass, but i guess it could happen.

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I didn't study and failed. I did very well on the subjects that I knew, but did horrible on the others.

I do structural design work all day, and had no problems with that section. The problem is trying to work problems that you haven't seen for 4 years.

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I "studied" for approx 16 hours for the test. I didnt want to study at all but my girlfriend nagged me so I opened my CERM book and put it on the floor while watching football for 2 hours a week for 4 weeks. Then the day before the test I did the Trans 6 minute solutions for 8 hours(basically copied all the answers from the back of the book to calc paper).

Passed 1st time. Probably wasn't the best line of studying to take, but I figured the cost of studying 200-300 hours and getting like a 6k raise wasn't a good investment of my time.

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Wow. I am envious of all you guys who are already such good engineers you don't need to study, or don't feel it is worth your time.

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Wow. I am envious of all you guys who are already such good engineers you don't need to study, or don't feel it is worth your time.

Do you think some exams are just easier than others? I did the Computer Engineering exam for instance, and didn't need a calculator. Also, the fact that Computer Engineering has little to no standards means almost no memorization-type problems. You can generally work everything from first principles, even if you don't remember the formulas.

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I can't speak for other depth sections but I really think if it was possible to pass any of these without studying at all it would be the Civil - Transportation section. I failed it the first time with 40 hours or so total of studying time, that 40 hours was in between a lot of Call of Duty and drinking, so in reality maybe 20 hours of real studying. As I'm writing this i'm thinking that 'real' studying was me just looking at how problems were solved, I didn't even do one problem. So I'm not sure if any of the time I spent can be considered studying..I missed it by about 5 problems...thought I did so much worse.

Second time (October 2010) I went all out with 'real' 200 hours or so of studying/doing problems, thought the Transportation Afternoon was almost a joke which made me feel real good leaving the test....Transporation Depth has A LOT of problems you can solve in 3 seconds by flipping open AASHTO Green Book, HCM or MUTCD manuals.

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Personally, I think there is a lot of value in the exercize of studying for the PE exam. The studying itself, not just passing the exam. For many of us, the exam comes later in a career, when re-learning this stuff (or learning for the first time) can make for a re-invigoration of your career. Maybe The Civil transportation exam is narrow enough that, if you work in that field, you aren't learning anything new by studying for it. For the enviro field, studying forced me to learn several subjects that I never had a chance to work on in my professional career. After the exam, I was able to volunteer for many additional tasks in these related subjects that I would have avoided before (air pollution modeling, chemistry, hydrogeology, etc.).

I know that passing the PE is a goal in itself, and for some people who are completely satisfied with their jobs, they may never need any additional skills. These people may be able to strategize a way to pass the exam, more so than learn the material. Personally, I'd rather be working with (and hiring) the types of people who want to learn new material, and not just do the bare minimum to get by.

Still, more power to those who were able to pass without studying, or with very little studying. Everyone is different.

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