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Found 11 results

  1. FORMWORK TYPES AND DESIGN IN CONSTRUCTION Formwork (shuttering) in concrete development is used as a mould for a construction wherein contemporaryconcrete is poured solely to harden subsequently. Sorts of concrete formwork development will depend on formwork materials and sort of structural ingredient. Formworks may also be named based mostly on the type of structural member construction comparable to slab formwork to be used in slab, beam formwork, column formwork to be used in beams and columns respectively and many others. The development of formwork takes time and includes expenditure upto 20 to 25% of the price of the construction or much more. Design of those momentarybuildings are made to financialexpenditure. The operation of eradicatingthe formwork is called stripping. Stripped formwork will be reused. Reusable typesare referred to as panel types and non-usable are referred to as stationary types... READ MORE HERE
  2. FORMWORK TYPES AND DESIGN IN CONSTRUCTION Formwork (shuttering) in concrete development is used as a mould for a construction wherein contemporaryconcrete is poured solely to harden subsequently. Sorts of concrete formwork development will depend on formwork materials and sort of structural ingredient. Formworks may also be named based mostly on the type of structural member construction comparable to slab formwork to be used in slab, beam formwork, column formwork to be used in beams and columns respectively and many others. The development of formwork takes time and includes expenditure upto 20 to 25% of the price of the construction or much more. Design of those momentarybuildings are made to financialexpenditure. The operation of eradicatingthe formwork is called stripping. Stripped formwork will be reused. Reusable typesare referred to as panel types and non-usable are referred to as stationary types... READ MORE HERE
  3. FORMWORK TYPES AND DESIGN IN CONSTRUCTION Formwork (shuttering) in concrete development is used as a mould for a construction wherein contemporaryconcrete is poured solely to harden subsequently. Sorts of concrete formwork development will depend on formwork materials and sort of structural ingredient. Formworks may also be named based mostly on the type of structural member construction comparable to slab formwork to be used in slab, beam formwork, column formwork to be used in beams and columns respectively and many others. The development of formwork takes time and includes expenditure upto 20 to 25% of the price of the construction or much more. Design of those momentarybuildings are made to financialexpenditure. The operation of eradicatingthe formwork is called stripping. Stripped formwork will be reused. Reusable typesare referred to as panel types and non-usable are referred to as stationary types... READ MORE HERE
  4. Hello everyone, I am required to analyse a building that has both steel framing for the first few floors and is then continued upwards as a concrete structure. I was able to use AISC's direct analysis method to check the deflections in the steel framing and check the members using reduced EI properties. When I get to checking concrete, the code doesn't give an explicit method on how to do something similar to that shown in AISC. My understanding is that I can use moment magnifiers or run the analysis with P-delta turned on. My goal is to analyse the entire model in one fashion, and I'm interested in finding out how to analyse the concrete structure with P-delta. 1) Would sway/non sway not matter when P-delta analysis is done? In AISC, they mention that k doesn't matter in P-delta analysis. 2) Is the iterative method to find EI applicable for concrete as well? I'm using RISA 3D to perform the analysis. I would appreciate any help as I do not have a lot of experience in dealing with concrete structures. Thanks, Vishal
  5. Hello, I have passed my PE construction exam and barely touched this book. Crazy expensive online for over $200. I am selling for $175 with free shipping at the below ebay link: https://www.ebay.com/itm/173412836527
  6. Concrete Manual: Based on the 2015 IBC and ACI 318-14 Has anyone used the book above? I am very comfortable with ACI and the other codes/standards relevant to Residential Structural Engineering. I am wondering if this book actually helps with application and detailing or if it is a summary/outline of the manuals titled. Thank you, EB!
  7. Looking over the special concrete shear wall design in chapter 21 of ACI I'm wondering about the minimum rebar ratios prescribed by 21.9.2.1 when the shearwall has flanges. The definitions of ρl and ρt in chapter 1 refer to gross concrete area perpendicular to the reinforcement. For the gross area regarding the horizontal reinforcement, that will clearly be the thickness of the web of the wall times the height of the wall. For the vertical reinforcement I would take the gross area to include the flanges. However, I wonder if they don't mean Acv (the area of the web of the wall times the length of the wall). Essentially the gross area of the wall minus the flanges. I wonder this because the vertical reinforcement is there to resist shear and compression and shouldn't care about the flanges (which are there for overturning moment resistance). Anyone else come across this? Do you think ρl should be in regard to the web thickness only?
  8. I have access to column interaction diagrams (ACI Design Handbook-09), but this book uses the 318-05 code. Of course, the SE test references 318-08. Question: Are there significant changes between -05 and -08 that would render these design aids useless? That is, can I use them for column design as is? If you’re familiar with this book and its other design aids, are there any other areas I should worry about? It seems the chapters on flexure and shear are okay. Any comments on the short columns, slender columns, or footing sections? Thanks in advance for any help you can provide!
  9. I'm working on Problem 603 of the NCEES Structural SE practice exam. It is a 1-way slab problem, regarding moments and shears in the beam. My question is regarding how they are calculating "Ln" for various conditions, shown on page 100. The center-to-center span is 30'-0", and the columns are all 24" square. I would assume that Ln is the clear distance, which would be 30' - 24"/2 - 24"/2 = 28'-0". Yet the solution is using a different value for Ln...in fact, they are using multiple values. From the solution: End span, Ln = 30.0 - 2.0 - 2.0/2 = 27 feet Interior span, Ln = 30.0 - 2.0/2 - 2.0/2 = 28 feet Ln = (27 + 28) /2 (average...???) They use Ln=27.0 for the Positive Moment M+ = wLn^2/14 They use Ln=27.5 for Negative Moment M- = wLn^2/10 or wLn^2/16 (at 1st interior support, and at exterior column respectively) Then they use Ln=27.0 for the shear reactions, V = 1.15wLn/2 or wLn/2 (at end member, and at all others) So... 1) Why is Ln not simply 28.0 for all conditions? 2) Why are they using different Ln values, for calculating various items for THE SAME BEAM? I'm rather confused. Any clarification would be greatly appreciated. Thanks all.
  10. Civil Engineering Calculator with many useful tools for analysis and design is available at http://civilengineer.webinfolist.com/cecalc.htm This free all-in-one package is including Bending moment, shear force, slope & deflection, moment of inertia, Moment distribution, fixed beam, continuous beam, overhanging beam, reinforced concrete beam etc.
  11. Page 305 has a probably Moment capacity (Mpr) of 2860 ft-kips. Can someone give me a brief help on how they come up with this? It seems I could solve it just like they do on previous pages, but there's very little info in the SEAOC. Would I sum up the moments from grade beams 46 and 47 and divide by half of the column length 29 since there is no column below? I'm clueless on this one and don't like accepting info without understanding it. Thanks in advance for anyone willing to take the time and study concrete with me...
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