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mech engineer

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About mech engineer

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    Mechanical Engineering
  1. I agree that HP 33s is the acceptable one. What I like about it it has all options you can possibly need on the exam. Not necessarily all of them are actually needed, but I just felt the more options I have the better off I am... The only thing - before the exam it is a good idea to solve 10-20-30 or more problems of all kind to learn all functions of the calculator, so that you would not have to struggle looking for SIN button on the exam... Also, I had with me EXACTLY the same HP 33s for a backup - in case the first one dies. Yes, it is an overkill, but it helped me to stay away of nightmares before the actual exam about my calculator's going bad right in the middle of the exam.
  2. That is exactly the point! If one of the states introduces MS as a mandatory rule, than the only way to apply for a comity is to comply with it. Otherwise being perfectly licensed in one state one may end up banned in other states where the 'MS rule' is in place. To get licensed in all 50 states ahead of year 2020 of course is an option, but quite costly... That's why I believe a graduate school is reasonable for the sake of keeping yourself up-to-date with all regulations. And plus - well, they teach useful stuff up there that looks good on the resume.
  3. Well, these 'news' have been around for a couple of years now... The best way not to worry about them is to have an M.S. degree - it makes you feel quite comfortable, since nothing threatens your PE status now or in the future... I've got my Masters and have no worries for life to come. Do the same - M.S. is quite interesting (most of the time) and quick (1-2 years). The flip side of it is the cost, though.
  4. Technically, if you have a license from any state you can legally call yourself an engineer in that state - regardless of your educational background. However, when you apply for a license in another state based on the lisence you already have there are two ways to do it: 1. Apply directly by filling out the application specific to that state and showing that you meet all the requirements. In this case, if the state allows to obtain the 'experience only' license you are fine and just document that experience 2. Creacting an NCEES record which is accepted universally by almost all the state Now, to create an NCEES record one MUST have an ABET college degree, otherwise the record cannot be established. Therefore, for 'experience only' folks the path thru the NCEES record is blocked. And at the same time some states mandate to all the applicants to establish an NCEES record as a part of the application process (I know KY does it), so some states will not except 'experience only applications' at all.
  5. Buddy, I used the printed materials from http://ppi2pass.com/ "the other board" ONLY. I passed just fine, the only thing - be prepared to sweat it. First of all, buy the MERM they offer. I think it is also awailable from Amazon a bit cheaper. Determine for yourself the depth you are best at (1 of 3) - and work on that depth thru MERM. They have a lot of problems in there - try them all. Some of them are tough, but it is worth it. By working on really tough problems you will grow the 'muscle' that will pull you thru the test. Now, remember that the solutions to the problems in MERM are sold in a separate booklet - don't forget to buy it, too, since you are gonna want to check out those solutions in detail. Do not neglect any portion of MERM, even Economics. If you feel comfortable with Economics, it may give you extra EASY points on the test - and you really need those points. Now, MERM is book #1 you have to have with you on the test. Inside MERM they list a few supplementary books they recommend you take to the test. Make sure to have them. They are not as important as MERM, but by having them on the test you may grab a few precious extra points that will save you the day... Besides MERM, you should also buy from "the other board" additional books of problems on your selected depth - and try them all, again. I mean, TRY, since those problems are often very complicated and require hours of work each. BUT, they are much more difficult than the actual problems on the test (you can check that out by buying NCEES sample test) - and it will give you the confidence that you need. :p10940623: The cost of all this stuff is less than $600, so go and buy it. Put all you've got into your preparations per "the other board", and you'll be licensed. Good luck!
  6. There is a similar rule in NY - if you have enough years of experience you don't even have to graduate from a kindergarden. You document your years of experience, get your references, and you are good to go...
  7. Buddy, TOEFL is not difficult at all. I took it and passed easily with a top score - even though people think that technical folks are not too good with languages. The only problem is after you pass the score is only valid for two years, which is sort of a hussle, since, say, in my case I took the test in 2001 and it is no good now. If needed, I would have to do it all over again - yuck! Most of the states though, take any Master's Degree for a proof of your proficiency in English. NJ, NY, and CT are just like that - you've got your MS? Forgeddaboutit. And, honestly, boss, if you've gotta stamp government paperwork, you've gotta understand completely what it is about. If it is no problem, than TOEFL is a piece of cake, too. P.S. If anybody find spelling errors in this posting, please keep in mind that I took my TOEFL in 2001
  8. I agree with you, chief. Based on my experience with the NJ board, it is the worst board possible. And looks like they are also understaffed, judging by the amount of time it takes them to do ANYTHING. I just hope to hear from them before I retire and no longer need this stamp.
  9. I don't know. There is always someone to complain to, I guess... Even if you want to complain about Bush there is someone to complain to - his wife. But honestly I've no clue who would be the whip holder in this situation.
  10. Guys, I sent my application to NJ board, and for well over a month they claim they did not receive the paperwork that was surely sent to them many weeks ago. They keep saying that they have a pile of paperwork to process and the missing documents probably just sit somewhere. Is it normal, in your opinion? Should I complainf to someone or sit back and let the things slide? Please share your experience
  11. Steve, what would you say matters than from your experience?
  12. Guys, my GPA is 4.0, however I never felt it gives me ANY advantage. On the contrary people often try avoid hiring someone who they think maybe out of realy world, unlike 2.7 grads... Real life experience and real skills - that's what they look for...
  13. Everybody has to constantly try to improve his or her engineering skills if he wants to land a better job or simply grow with the current employer. What are the skills that are in most demand on the market that a mechanical engineer has to acquire in order to succeed? For instance, I would assume it is quite useful yo have good working knowledge of SolidWorks or another 3-D design program. What else?
  14. Friend, This Arizona experience is quite weird... In NY there is NO RECORD anywhere what is your particular branch. Once you meet all the requirements in ANY branch, you are granted a general Professional Engineer's license that gives you all rights to practice in any branch of engineering. If you browse public records for NY Professional Engineers, there is no word anywhere as to what their branches are. However, an engineer is restricted by ethical guidelines. You are required not to practice in the branch of engineering where you do not believe you have sufficient expertise. However, the state officials do not extend their judgment as to whether you have that expertise or you do not. It is up to the engineer himself/herself to decide if he/she can work on that project or not. That's my understanding. Correct me if I am wrong
  15. Hello! I live in NY/NJ/CT area (Tri-State area), and it is quite nice to be registered in all the three states. So, after I got my PE license in NY, I also applied in CT and now try to go for NJ. I would like to know about experiences of other people who went for reciprocity/comity. My personal experience is: 1. The paperwork is huge and BORING 2. The rules across the river may be so different, as if you apply for a license in Burundi 3. You have to wait 4. Be ready to shell out all those fees 5. People from the state boards may be rude
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