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Industrial Engineers?


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#1 Guest_screw_*

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Posted 20 February 2007 - 02:09 AM

Civils, structurals, mechanicals, electricals, chemicals, etc.... any industrial engineers on this forum? Any industrial engineers taking the next FE or PE exam? I'm an industrial, took both exams last year, and found this web site while waiting for the October PE exam results. I just sat on the sidelines and read about what everyone else had to say. I did get hooked on this site, lots of good people. I found very little out there for industrial engineers as far as study materials and references for the exam. I know very few industrial engineers get their PE, its not really needed. In fact, I never met one.

Getting the PE has been a boost to my career and I would like to see more industrials pursuing a PE license. I think it would be good for the industrial engineering profession and good for engineering in general. Many industrial engineers find themselves working with all the other disciplines across many industries. I do. (Probably a bad example, but I believe Lindeburg is an industrial PE)

Any thoughts? Any industrials hiding out there? Or are they all just browsing, being quiet, laughing at the Emoticons, and just hoping they passed on their own with a few old text books from school?

If you're out there, you could probably get more use out of a site like this, if you speak up.

Just askin' :appl:

#2 DVINNY

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Posted 20 February 2007 - 01:09 PM

I'm not, but worked as an Industrial for the first two years out of college. Data collection, manipulation, and time studies, etc. etc.

#3 Guest_screw_*

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Posted 20 February 2007 - 02:11 PM

I'm not, but worked as an Industrial for the first two years out of college. Data collection, manipulation, and time studies, etc. etc.


:appl: We like to refer to "manipulation" as "managing." The higher-ups tend not to raise an eyebrow when we tell them the "the numbers are being managed."

I am a project management consultant and I work with many a PE in other disciplines. Lately I have been scheduling power plant projects and helping engineering firms understand and streamline their project controls processes. The PE has given me a sense of credibility with who I respectfully call "slide rule" engineers. I don't do their calculations and I don't pretend to be an expert in their field, but I can hold relevant and educated conversations with the most senior design engineer where we can both walk away with an understanding of the issues. With this, I can help them get to the finish line faster and more efficiently. That is why I think more IEs need to seriously consider the PE.

With this said, I am definately wanting and willing to help any IEs out there get their PE. If you're on this forum, speak out!

#4 benbo

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Posted 20 February 2007 - 04:23 PM

There was a very knowlegeable fellow who used to post on the infamous site that got his PE in industrial. His name was John Price. I also work with a woman who is an industrial PE.

#5 SSmith

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Posted 21 September 2007 - 04:54 PM

QUOTE (screw @ Feb 19 2007, 10:09 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If you're out there, you could probably get more use out of a site like this, if you speak up.

Just askin' blush.gif


Im taking the IE PE in October. Not feeling too confident about it. I went to school as a Chem Eng, but after college work has all be IE for the government. After reviewing the Kennedy Sample Test (read failing miserably), Im buckling down for it but the lack of resources is making that effort difficult.

#6 Guest_screw_*

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Posted 05 October 2007 - 01:24 AM

QUOTE (SSmith @ Sep 21 2007, 12:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Im taking the IE PE in October. Not feeling too confident about it. I went to school as a Chem Eng, but after college work has all be IE for the government. After reviewing the Kennedy Sample Test (read failing miserably), Im buckling down for it but the lack of resources is making that effort difficult.


I know it! Besides my old IE texts, the Kennedy sample test is really the only thing out there. Its disappointing. angry.gif

A good engineering econ and statistics reference will come in handy. Don't forget the FE Reference Handbook.

Good luck. thumbs.gif

#7 SSmith

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Posted 24 October 2007 - 07:21 PM

QUOTE (screw @ Oct 4 2007, 09:24 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I know it! Besides my old IE texts, the Kennedy sample test is really the only thing out there. Its disappointing. angry.gif

A good engineering econ and statistics reference will come in handy. Don't forget the FE Reference Handbook.

Good luck. thumbs.gif


Ive gotten really familiar with the engineering econ and stats references again. This is another part about the test that is frustrating. For econ problems, I prefer to set the equation up mathematically and then hit solve either on my TI92 or some math software. With statistics I prefer to use Excel's package. But to pass this exam I not only need to know how to solve the problem, I have to do it with their constrained toolset. I was this limited in what options I could use on a test in college!

Whining I know, just venting more frustration.

(Back to reviewing.)

#8 SSmith

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Posted 24 October 2007 - 08:39 PM

QUOTE (SSmith @ Oct 24 2007, 03:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Ive gotten really familiar with the engineering econ and stats references again. This is another part about the test that is frustrating. For econ problems, I prefer to set the equation up mathematically and then hit solve either on my TI92 or some math software. With statistics I prefer to use Excel's package. But to pass this exam I not only need to know how to solve the problem, I have to do it with their constrained toolset. I wasnt this limited in what options I could use on a test in college!

Whining I know, just venting more frustration.

(Back to reviewing.)


Corrected to make sense. smile.gif

#9 Guest_screw_*

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Posted 16 February 2008 - 12:28 AM

Any industrial engineers taking the exam in April?

#10 SSmith

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Posted 16 February 2008 - 05:02 AM

Not here. (Is it even offered in the Spring? For some reason I was thinking it was only offered in the Fall.)

I was one of the lucky few that passed it on the first time in October!


#11 Guest_screw_*

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Posted 17 February 2008 - 01:36 AM

QUOTE (SSmith @ Feb 16 2008, 12:02 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Not here. (Is it even offered in the Spring? For some reason I was thinking it was only offered in the Fall.)

I was one of the lucky few that passed it on the first time in October!


oops.gif

You're right! They only give the IE PE in October. How about the FE? Anyone considering the Industrial module for the FE?

I think more IE's should try and get the PE license....



#12 Laura

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Posted 30 September 2010 - 12:51 AM

First off, I am very happy I found this thread. I thought I was the only person taking the Industrial PE!!!

I am taking the exam next month and am at a loss. I've found the sample test and the review book by Kennedy/Young a couple of you have mentioned, but that's all that's out there. Unfortunately I don't have any books from college, so I've resorted to printing info out from the internet and putting together my own binder with things I think I might need based on the review book. Think that's enough? Anyone have any advice? Is there anything I "must" have?

#13 solomonb

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 03:43 AM

Colleagues-- I took the industrial examination a few years ago, after having been out of school and in senior management for 35+years. Yes, I passed it the first time! I did take the IIE review class-- that was most helpful, however, as many other postings on this site have stated, understanding and working the problems is probably the key. My advice would be to take the Kennedy review course sponsored by IIE-- too late for this year, however, you can take it next year and then take the examination. I think that IIE gives the review course the middle of August-- check their web site to be sure. I am licensed in two states. I think that if you do not have the college books, probably the best way is to get some recent, current textbooks from Amazon.com, buy them used and review them. The NCEES web site details the items of examination-- that tells you what types of questions are on the test. With these factoids, you are then able to develop and execute a successful study program. This will also identify the textbooks you probably need to review. Call back to the department from which you graduated and talk to the professor that is teaching the respective courses you wish to review. Find out what textbooks he/she is using, then go buy a used version and study.

Remember, this is a bachelor's level examination-- don't over complicate this program. Yes, it is frustrating, however, if you graduated from an ABET accredited school, you have done all this before. The test determines if you are "minimally competent"-- not if you are the best rocket scientist in the class.

Sadly, I did not know about this site until I was licensed in two states-- and I had to take the examination 35 years after school and not doing any real hard engineering. I have always been in senior management in the "C" suite, however-- all of that means nothing when you take the examination! I was just as nervous and flumoxxed as the next individual.

You can do this-- put your shoulder to the wheel and push-- the wagon will move.

#14 wiregirl

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 07:54 PM

Thanks Solomon, if you're still out there somewhere, for your words of wisdom. I'm taking the IE PE in October, 21 years post-college. My degree is in manufacturing engineering but I work in power design QA and took the EE 3 times before I came to the conclusion I need to go back to what I was comfortable with - at least for the PE. I've been very frustrated on the lack of IE resources but have pretty much done what you've said and I coerced my boss to let me go to the review course in October. Amazon has used textbooks cheap if you need to build a library.

#15 solomonb

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 10:57 PM

Wiregirl-- I have helped develop the PE IE examination for the past 2 years, along with many other PE's who are Industrial Engineers. It is sad that many Industrial Engineers fail to see the merit and value in becoming an registered Professional Engineer. However, in today's world, one never knows when he/she needs another "notch in the gun."

My previous comment still stands-- the IIE review course is probably a good program to take if you have been out of school for some time. Not only will you work similiar problems to what may be on the examination, you will learn about test taking skills. This is what the NSPE recommends for anyone who has been out of school for a few years. Yes, it costs money, however, there is no reason to take the test more than once either. Said another way, you can pay for a review course up front and make a great effort, or try and study alone and perhaps have to take the examination more than one time. It costs money either way!

The NCEES test specification, located on the NCEES web site, addresses all of the material that may be on the examination. These are the "Elements of Examination" that comprises the IE PE examination. Of course, that is true for any other engineering discipline also. Probably the best way to develop a study regime is to outline the test specification and then review books that address each of those topic areas. Yes, you will have a rich 3 ring notebook, however, you will also have studied everything that may appear on the examination.

The test is designed for each question to be answered in 6 minutes or less. I can say that some questions can be answered with less time, some with more time. However, by inspection, you should be able to know and understand the topic that the question is addressing. I would guess that we probably have 4-6 Industrial Engineers, all with PhD's and all licensed professional engineers work the problems several times before a question is finally submitted to NCEES. Topic clarity, is the test question clear, do the answers make sense are just some of the factors that each of us reviews and evaluates before a question is finally submitted to NCEES.

2012 will be the last year that the IE PE test will be given in October. Beginning in 2013, the test will be given in April. Not sure the reason for the change, however, should make no difference with you taking the examination.

My other previous comment still stands-- this test is designed to ascertain the engineer that is "minimally competent." One of my academic colleagues says that this is the C- student. I had thought it was the D student, however, my academic colleague corrected me! Further recall that this test is designed to be successfully completed by the IE that only has a 4 year undergraduate degree with 4 years of work experience. Probably, many of the courses that you had in the Junior and Senior year will be applicable to areas of the examination. Again, review the examination specifications on the NCEES website. All of that material is covered in the undergraduate IE program at any ABET accredited institution.

Again, don't make this tougher than it really is. There are no "trick" questions or questions that are "spooky." This test successfully measures the ability of the minimally competent engineer to address questions which are common to the Industrial discipline. I understand that is true of all of the other examinations as well.

I hope that this is helpful to you-- good luck in your study/review regime. I know that this is stressful-- it was for me when I had to take the examination and I was out of school for 35 years always in senior management!!!! Develop a rigorous, robust systems based study approach and you should have no problem passing the examination. Good Luck!

Edited by solomonb, 01 June 2012 - 11:09 PM.


#16 TRAIN

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 08:55 PM

I recently passed the IE PE Exam last October. I self studied and was able to past after being out of school for 10 years with a degree in Chemical Engineering. Like others have state the material from W.J. Kennedy was the most helpful (the review book and the sample exam. The other book that I found helpful was the Introduction to Industrial and Systems Engineering (Wayne C Turner, Joe H Mize, Kenneth E Case, and John W Nazemetz). There is definitely a lack of resources when compaired to other disciplines. So to supplement areas I was week I did a lot of "Googling" of Industrial Engineering topics covered on the book. I had a nice binder on topics of Queing, NIOSH, Learning Curve, Forecasting, ANOVA, etc.

#17 wiregirl

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 02:06 AM

Passed in October 2012!! I took the course at IIE in August and it was very helpfu - I highly recommend everyone take it if you can. Otherwise I used old textbooks from Amazon and worked tons of problems.

#18 IEPE

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 08:59 PM

My experience at my last company was that an Industrial PE was a big deal and an aid in career advancement -- I knew of 4 there before I left.  I'm it, as far as I know, at my current company.  I found the review and practice exam by W.J. Kennedy (mentioned above and available on IIE website) to be very helpul.  I also would look at A Concise Reference Guide for the Principles and Practice of Engineering Industrial Exam (INBN 0615801285) on Amazon.






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