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#1 Exception Collection

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:33 PM

I've never been through a "professional" interviewing process - when I was hired at my current place of employment, it was as much about the fact that I could handle their network as it was that I could handle their drafting needs. Engineering didn't even enter into the equation.

I have an interview next week; should I prepare samples (details, calculation pages, etc) of my work from current or former projects at my current office, or should I just be prepared to answer questions regarding what kinds of projects I've worked on in the past?

#2 CbusPaul

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 12:59 PM

I would just be prepared to answer questions on projects you've worked on. I have never been asked to provide sample calculations.

#3 envirotex

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 01:21 PM

^^^Me neither, on the calcs...I would just bring a CV with your project experience, and be prepared to be asked questions about that.

#4 VTEnviro

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 02:23 PM

I always bring a writing sample and a drafting sample, in the event they ask about it. Something simple, not a 40 page report or giant set of plans for a WW plant, just something like a project narrative and a couple of plan sheets from a small job.

#5 bradlelf

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 03:32 PM

I have never brought any type of portfolio to a job interview. Bring a copy of your CV and be prepared to talk about the details of any of those projects. Talk about the design and approval process and what your level of involvement was.

If you got to the interview, they already assume you are technically proficient. They are looking at you as a person now; sell yourself and who you are.

Good lu ck

#6 Exception Collection

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 08:52 PM

Thanks.

No CV to give, since I got my license via experience only. I think I will take a handful of sanitized calcs, but only because I wrote or updated the spreadsheets for most of what we use.

Thanks everyone.

#7 envirotex

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 10:57 PM

Your CV would be your experience record; It's basically equivalent to the experience record you submitted to get your license...Mine lists all of the projects that have worked on since I started my engineering career (not the 4 years I spent loading trucks), plus some technical papers that I have published. It's typically arranged by year or by project type. You don't don't have to put your clients' names on it, just describe what you did.

#8 Road Guy

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 02:11 AM

Okay I amm slow, what's a CV?


I would yahoo some common interview questions (why do you want this job) tell me something unusual you have overcome at work....

Sometimes they ask non engineering related questions...

#9 envirotex

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 03:47 AM

Curriculum vitae.

http://en.wikipedia....urriculum_vitae

It's an extended resume...

#10 engineergurl

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 04:25 AM

Okay I amm slow, what's a CV?


Thank you, I was starting to feel a little off since I didn't know either....

#11 Exception Collection

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 06:31 AM

Heh. One of the benefits of being a computer geek: When I run into an abbreviation I don't recognize, I just Google it.

Still, I think I'll provide an abbreviated list, since I've been doing this for twelve years at an average of a project a week for most of that time.

#12 Capt Worley PE

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 01:12 PM

Okay I amm slow, what's a CV?


Aircraft carrier, non-nuclear.

#13 Peele1

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 06:23 PM

There are many interview types. Some are looking to see if your personality is a fit for the job, team and business. Some may ask you totally off questions about random things to see your response. I've heard of interview panels where one person simply asks where the candidate is really from, and based on that answer said that the candidate was good with them and recommended a hire. In one of my interviews, it was spent with them telling me what to expect in the group interview which was next. Other interviews may be like a test of some sort. Be calm and prepared for anything. Don't lie about anything. You are (almost as much) interviewing them as well - you may not like the job, team, or business. I've turned down jobs in the interview.
Good luck.

#14 YMZ PE

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 01:47 AM

I've gotten basic technical questions in interviews. I've also been asked to produce a writing sample. Exception Collection, I think what you're planning on bringing will be fine. Best of luck to you.

#15 solomonb

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 04:25 AM

We do not counsel our clients on taking any writing or calculation samples to the interview. You are being interviewed because you have something that they (hiring company) thought important from your application, CV, resume or personal recommendation. If the hiring authority wants some samples, they will ask for them-- send them after they ask.

I would be conversant in some non-engineering types of questions-- or something that has some tangential relaationship to engineering--i.e., the XL pipeline debacle in Nebraska. You don't need to know all of the details, however, you might want to address some aspects of the engineering challenges going through the Sand Hills-- if you have a civil background. I would do some research on the firm that you are interviewing with---- what do they do-- who are their previous and current clients-- what kind of work did they do for the clients-- you don't need to know the details, however, some ideas of what the firm did/does for like type of clients will demonstrate that you at least did some homework and can talk intelligently on work that the firm has done. Don't freak out over this-- however a couple of hours of web research will go a long way in showing that at least you have done some initial due diligence.

You might a lot of "fit" type of questions-- do you like to play softball-- bowl-- whatever the "culture" of the firm is. Finding out the culture of the firm is often instructive in anticipating what kind of questions you may be asked. It is not uncommon to ask all kinds of non engineering questions to be sure that you will be a valued team member if indeed the job is offered to you.

Good Luck.




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