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#1 thwlruss

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 07:10 PM

in my studies I've seen little reference to external flow. drag, lift, flow profiles, ect. How much time should I spend on external flow during my studies?

#2 Clydeman

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 11:49 PM

Very little (I took TF depth). And if there does happen to be one I would imagine it would be pretty easy to solve.

I would advise hitting Chapter 18 pretty hard. They seems to really love pump related problems (head added and removed from a system). Get to know unit conversion with hydraulic horsepowe (tab page 18-7).



#3 thwlruss

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Posted 14 September 2011 - 02:38 PM

QUOTE (thwlruss @ Sep 13 2011, 07:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
in my studies I've seen little reference to external flow. drag, lift, flow profiles, ect. How much time should I spend on external flow during my studies?


sounds good. I've actually been through that chapter a couple times already. I've covered most of the basic topics and am looking into more obscure topics- compressible flow, external flow, machine design ect. At times it seems like I'm going rogue...

#4 MadDawg

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Posted 15 September 2011 - 12:41 AM

QUOTE (thwlruss @ Sep 14 2011, 10:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (thwlruss @ Sep 13 2011, 07:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
in my studies I've seen little reference to external flow. drag, lift, flow profiles, ect. How much time should I spend on external flow during my studies?


sounds good. I've actually been through that chapter a couple times already. I've covered most of the basic topics and am looking into more obscure topics- compressible flow, external flow, machine design ect. At times it seems like I'm going rogue...


Obscure is just that--obscure. If you're crunched for time, I'd recommend studying the basics. When I first started studying I spent a lot of time on the most specific topics, but then I realized that there's a limited number of questions, and the chances that I'd get some obscure off the wall question probably wouldn't increase that much even if I spent a lot of time preparing. If you have the basics down well you'll have more time to work through the obscure problems during the test, or at least have more time to read that section of the MERM to make an educated guess. Good luck!

#5 jamiecta

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Posted 15 September 2011 - 01:22 AM

QUOTE (MadDawg @ Sep 15 2011, 12:41 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (thwlruss @ Sep 14 2011, 10:38 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (thwlruss @ Sep 13 2011, 07:10 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
in my studies I've seen little reference to external flow. drag, lift, flow profiles, ect. How much time should I spend on external flow during my studies?


sounds good. I've actually been through that chapter a couple times already. I've covered most of the basic topics and am looking into more obscure topics- compressible flow, external flow, machine design ect. At times it seems like I'm going rogue...


Obscure is just that--obscure. If you're crunched for time, I'd recommend studying the basics. When I first started studying I spent a lot of time on the most specific topics, but then I realized that there's a limited number of questions, and the chances that I'd get some obscure off the wall question probably wouldn't increase that much even if I spent a lot of time preparing. If you have the basics down well you'll have more time to work through the obscure problems during the test, or at least have more time to read that section of the MERM to make an educated guess. Good luck!


I have to agree. I started studying several months ago (around May to be exact). I chose ~3 MERM chapters to read and do questions from each week until I finished going through chapters 14-48 around late July/early August. Since then I have done nothing but re-work MERM problems, 6MS solutions problems, and problems from some other sources. Over the last two weeks I took the HVAC+R and the T+F depths as well as the morning portion of the practice exams and to be honest NCEES seems to cover/ask the same kinds of questions over and over and over just with slightly different input data. I'd say that I have rarely seen external flow outside of MERM problems.

My advice at this point? Whatever the MERM covers is probably sufficient in regards to drag, buoyancy etc.

#6 thwlruss

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Posted 15 September 2011 - 01:32 PM

sounds good. My confidence level is rising. This last six weeks I'll primarily be reviewing stuff I've already been through and practicing solving problems in a test-like environment. Thanks

#7 Clydeman

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Posted 15 September 2011 - 03:07 PM

I cannot emphasize enough how critical it is to take and study the NCEES practice exams. I am pretty sure you all know this now.

I was lucky enough to find a copy (from the library) of the 2001 test. Of course I also had the 2008 test which is the same as the 2010 test but not broken up into 3 books. You will see the trends of the problems from the tests. Yes they will throw some new things at you. But the actual test will have a lot in common with the practice exams.

I would even recommend giving it some time after you take the NCEES practice exam and reworking problems.

Also the Lindeburg sample exam is pretty decent in my opinion. That is probably the second best representative test after NCEES.

#8 jamiecta

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Posted 15 September 2011 - 03:48 PM

QUOTE (Clydeman @ Sep 15 2011, 03:07 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I cannot emphasize enough how critical it is to take and study the NCEES practice exams. I am pretty sure you all know this now.

I was lucky enough to find a copy (from the library) of the 2001 test. Of course I also had the 2008 test which is the same as the 2010 test but not broken up into 3 books. You will see the trends of the problems from the tests. Yes they will throw some new things at you. But the actual test will have a lot in common with the practice exams.

I would even recommend giving it some time after you take the NCEES practice exam and reworking problems.

Also the Lindeburg sample exam is pretty decent in my opinion. That is probably the second best representative test after NCEES.


That is good to hear because I felt the NCEES practice exam was very easy after studying the MERM and 6MS and some ASHRAE sample problems for months. I took the HVAC-R full 80 question NCEES sample exam for the first time this past Friday and scored 66/80. I also took the full Thermo & Fluids full NCEES practice exam since then and scored a 59/80. I'll glance at the Machine Design one, but I am not really putting that much emphasis on Machine Design outside of the MERM.

At this point my whole plan is to just sit down and take those two NCEES sample exams again, take the 6MS sample exam again, and then take the Lindeburg sample exam for the first time. Beyond that I kind of feel like I am just in a "maintain knowledge" mode with the practice scores I got and 6 weeks to go.

Edited by jamiecta, 15 September 2011 - 03:52 PM.


#9 thwlruss

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Posted 15 September 2011 - 05:05 PM

QUOTE (Clydeman @ Sep 15 2011, 03:07 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I cannot emphasize enough how critical it is to take and study the NCEES practice exams. I am pretty sure you all know this now.

I was lucky enough to find a copy (from the library) of the 2001 test. Of course I also had the 2008 test which is the same as the 2010 test but not broken up into 3 books. You will see the trends of the problems from the tests. Yes they will throw some new things at you. But the actual test will have a lot in common with the practice exams.

I would even recommend giving it some time after you take the NCEES practice exam and reworking problems.

Also the Lindeburg sample exam is pretty decent in my opinion. That is probably the second best representative test after NCEES.


I have the Lindburg practice exam, the 2010 NCEES practice exam, HVAC 6MS, T/F 6MS, the MERM, Keenan Steam Tables, three Kaplan study guides, and 16 PE exam prep videos from ASME. Perhaps the 2001 sample exam would be helpful but I just cannot bring myself to buy anything else. I still may, or I might find it in a library. Okay, I'll look.

#10 jamiecta

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Posted 15 September 2011 - 05:44 PM

I looked for awhile for a copy of the 2001 sample exam to purchase or check out and couldn't find any around me (checked the library too). I finally just gave up and assumed the 2008 exam plus the MERM, 6MS, and Lindeburg would be enough. If you run across a good avenue to get a copy of the 2001 test let me know though smile.gif

#11 MadDawg

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Posted 16 September 2011 - 02:01 AM

QUOTE (jamiecta @ Sep 15 2011, 01:44 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I looked for awhile for a copy of the 2001 sample exam to purchase or check out and couldn't find any around me (checked the library too). I finally just gave up and assumed the 2008 exam plus the MERM, 6MS, and Lindeburg would be enough. If you run across a good avenue to get a copy of the 2001 test let me know though smile.gif



The 2001 test had a lot of overlap with the 2008. If you use the 6MS, Lindeburg, and the 2008 test in conjunction with the MERM you'll be fine.

#12 tmacier

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Posted 18 September 2011 - 10:41 AM

QUOTE (jamiecta @ Sep 15 2011, 01:44 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I looked for awhile for a copy of the 2001 sample exam to purchase or check out and couldn't find any around me (checked the library too). I finally just gave up and assumed the 2008 exam plus the MERM, 6MS, and Lindeburg would be enough. If you run across a good avenue to get a copy of the 2001 test let me know though smile.gif


This is fine - just keep working all problems - over and over - know exactly were to the find the info in your tabbed referances!

Just when you think you have worked the problems enough - do them again!

Tim

#13 jamiecta

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 09:54 PM

Today I took the HVAC afternoon again as my "breadth" portion and took the T&F afternoon as my "Depth." I had done the HVAC portion previously and had not done the T&F portion all the way through yet.

Scored a 36/40 and a 34/40 respectively. 5 weeks to go; hope I can keep the positivity rolling!

PS: I'm not putting a lot of emphasis on MD. I did the 6MS for machine design and did the practice problems/tabbed the MERM but that is all I am going to do for MD I think. I have really hit HVAC + T&F hard hoping that knowing those two stone cold will be plenty good enough to pass.

Edited by jamiecta, 23 September 2011 - 09:56 PM.


#14 tmacier

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 10:19 AM

QUOTE (jamiecta @ Sep 23 2011, 05:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Today I took the HVAC afternoon again as my "breadth" portion and took the T&F afternoon as my "Depth." I had done the HVAC portion previously and had not done the T&F portion all the way through yet.

Scored a 36/40 and a 34/40 respectively. 5 weeks to go; hope I can keep the positivity rolling!

PS: I'm not putting a lot of emphasis on MD. I did the 6MS for machine design and did the practice problems/tabbed the MERM but that is all I am going to do for MD I think. I have really hit HVAC + T&F hard hoping that knowing those two stone cold will be plenty good enough to pass.


Be sure to work the merm problems and six minute solution problems!

Keep going and keep studying!

#15 MadDawg

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 03:10 PM

QUOTE (jamiecta @ Sep 23 2011, 05:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Today I took the HVAC afternoon again as my "breadth" portion and took the T&F afternoon as my "Depth." I had done the HVAC portion previously and had not done the T&F portion all the way through yet.

Scored a 36/40 and a 34/40 respectively. 5 weeks to go; hope I can keep the positivity rolling!

PS: I'm not putting a lot of emphasis on MD. I did the 6MS for machine design and did the practice problems/tabbed the MERM but that is all I am going to do for MD I think. I have really hit HVAC + T&F hard hoping that knowing those two stone cold will be plenty good enough to pass.



That's a lot better than I did on my sample run-through about 1 month before the test (but I hadn't looked at the problems previously) and I passed. You seem to be in a good spot so I wouldn't worry. Just keep being deliberate in your preparation and you'll do fine.

#16 jamiecta

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Posted 27 September 2011 - 05:00 PM

appreciate the support guys.




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