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#1 meltiger

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 03:44 PM

Does anyone know of any online review courses available?
What is a good reference for plant design and kinetics?
Any advise for studying plant design and kinetics?
Any good advise for organizing info to take into the exam?
If I'm not already familiar with Perry's reference book, is it worth getting for exam prep?
Is the Kaplan series worth getting in additiion to the PPI, NCEES books?

#2 snickerd3

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 03:58 PM

Can't help on the first one. I couldn't find any when I took the test several years ago.
For plant design and kinetics, i used my college texts to supplement the ChERM.
I tabbed the hell out of the ChERM as I was studying, this way a helpful table was flagged as I using it to study.
If you don't already have a Perry's I wouldn't necessarily buy one, if you can borrow from a library or friend that would be better. Its more of a when you really have no clue. It is not a very user friendly book, takes some getting used to.

Can't help with the kaplan stuff either.

I used the ChERM and my college textbooks during the test. I brought my perrys but didn't use it.
To study i used the ChERM, the ChERM problems and the 6 minute book. Didn't know sample exams existed when I took the test (2006).
FWIW, I passed first attempt using what i listed.





#3 CbusPaul

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 04:45 PM

^^ I second everything she said. Stick to references that you are familiar with that present the information in the manner that you were originally taught. ChERM is very good for a broad overview. If you are weak in a section of the ChERM then dust off the text book and relearn it. You will be surprised how quickly it comes back.

#4 2bsss

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 10:53 PM

I thought the ChERM useful for most sections except for kinetics and distillation/gas absorption (or stripping). The chemical thermodynamics was a little lacking too but I supplemented with my college textbooks. Maybe I am in the minority in regards to Perry's. I found it quite useful, both in studying and in the exam. I agree it isn't set up the best and it is sometimes difficult to find what you are looking for. I would suggest purchasing one and having it available as you study and work problems. Once I used it for a while I was able to find what I was looking for rather quickly. I do not regret buying it.

Edit: I would also strongly urge you to get a practice exam from NCEES.

Edited by 2bsss, 21 June 2011 - 10:54 PM.


#5 meltiger

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Posted 22 June 2011 - 08:29 PM

Thanks for everyone's suggestions. I'm actually a materials engineer but there is practically NO study materials for that exam...so I'm giving Chemical a try (yes, I know I may be crazy). Therefore I don't have college textbooks for plant design or kinetics. Does anyone have any reccomendations??

#6 snickerd3

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Posted 22 June 2011 - 08:35 PM

I used Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd edition by Fogler in college. ISBN 0-13-531708-8

#7 2bsss

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Posted 22 June 2011 - 11:52 PM

QUOTE (snickerd3 @ Jun 22 2011, 03:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I used Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd edition by Fogler in college. ISBN 0-13-531708-8


This, or Chemical Reaction Engineering by Octave Levenspiel. As far as plant design, the ChERM is probably good enough along with Perry's. I would suggest a good chemical engineering thermodynamics book (if there is such a thing) and a good unit operations book like Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering by Warren McCabe.




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