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AE PE April 2011


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#1 Nickarus

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Posted 28 December 2010 - 11:17 PM

Hi everyone!

I'm studying for the April 2011 Architectural Engineering PE exam, and have a few questions for anyone else out there who may have walked or is currently treading this path:

1. I noticed the practice exam has a question or two involving the AIA contract docs, but none of the suggested reference material really covers them iirc... is there any suggested reading (besides reading all the AIA docs - eek!) that would be sufficient for those of us who don't handle these on a day-to-day basis? If the only real good source are the contract docs themselves, is the exam supposed to cover everything or may we limit our review to a few choice docs?

2. I've got my hands on the Second Edition of the "Principles and Practice of Engineering: Architectural Engineering Sample Questions and Solutions." After burning through this tiny booklet, I really wish I had more in the way of practice test materials to feel comfortable... If I seek out the first edition does it contain different problems or is the 2nd edition just a corrected 1st edition? Is there really anything else out there with sample questions to practice?

Thanks much!

Edited by Nickarus, 28 December 2010 - 11:17 PM.


#2 LEEDengineer

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Posted 16 January 2011 - 01:04 AM

The first edition is similar to the second and doesn't offer the level of detail in the solutions like you can get with the 6-Minute books. I'm studying for the April 2011 AE PE myself and it's quite frustrating.

#3 CallMeAl82

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 11:51 PM

I too am in the same pickle. You'd think that since it's been a few years since this exam was offered that there would be more study materials out there. I'm trained as an ME but the AE exam seems more suited to my skillset. I just want to know if I'm shooting myself in the foot by taking the AE exam versus the ME HVAC exam (which I have not directly practiced in a number of years).

#4 Nickarus

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Posted 18 February 2011 - 09:27 PM

QUOTE (LEEDengineer @ Jan 15 2011, 07:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The first edition is similar to the second and doesn't offer the level of detail in the solutions like you can get with the 6-Minute books. I'm studying for the April 2011 AE PE myself and it's quite frustrating.


I managed to get a copy of the 1st edition before reading this advice and can confirm: no reason to seek out both editions - the 2nd is an updated/improved version of the 1st.

I did pick up a good tip on my own: I spent a lot of time seeking/printing/reviewing MEP fundamentals (i.e. pump laws, electrical triangles, structural beam flex/moment formulas) before remembering this stuff is already compiled neatly in the FE exam reference handbook... I didn't save (or can't find) my hard copy from college, but it's free and available as a PDF on the NCEES website (you might need to log in)!

I'm planning to print that out (its big), filter through and tab out content covered in the AE exam, and put that in a binder for a reference next time I can find a block of time wink.gif.

#5 archeng1

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 06:08 PM

hi everyone,
I passed the AE exam in April and it was definitely challenging trying to study for the exam given the limited study prep material.
I have an Architectural Engineering degree but really never worked directly in design, most of my experience is in the field of Construction Management. I found the exam wasn't too bad as far as being familiar with all the questions and having ample time to answer everything except for those few guesses.

I posted in another forum what I used most in the exam as far as reference materials about a year ago so if you search the forum for AE study you will find the thread, it has good information of how other prepared for the exam. I basically studied by going through the 2nd edition of the practice guide and finding my week points then putting more emphasis on those. I would suggest going through the study guide in detail and writing out all the solutions knowing them inside and out. (there are ever a few questions right from the book, word for word) I also found helpful and old CERM manual that one of the older engineers in my firm gave me, it was dated from 1982 but i found the structural review topics really helpful and the problems were relevant to the type on the exam. I would also suggest absolutely having the NEC Handbook if you can get the full version (I had the 2002 which is sufficient) then I had a great referenece that covers alot of the material on the examwhich I had from college, it is called Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings (just a great overall reference and practical - came in handy in the exam for looking stuff up) I also used a concrete and steel textbook i borrowed off of another engineer (get one that references the ACI and LRFD) These are much easier that paging through the Steel and concrete manuals for the people like me that aren't strong in structures. I also went to the web site engineeringtoolbox to pickup short refreshers on specific topics and get right to the necessary formulas. I printed and organized them by topic then put them in a 3 ring binder (i think most states allow this type of binding just not loose papers - so check with your requirements by state) I learned of the 6 minute solutions after the exam so i wasnt able to have those but i think they would have helped alot.
I ended bringing about 20-25 books into the exam but really only used 5-6 of them.

if anyone has any other quesitons drop me a note or i will check back to this post.
and good luck studying if I can do you all can too!

#6 kbales

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 08:17 PM

QUOTE (archeng1 @ Mar 3 2011, 02:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
hi everyone,
I passed the AE exam in April and it was definitely challenging trying to study for the exam given the limited study prep material.
I have an Architectural Engineering degree but really never worked directly in design, most of my experience is in the field of Construction Management. I found the exam wasn't too bad as far as being familiar with all the questions and having ample time to answer everything except for those few guesses.

I posted in another forum what I used most in the exam as far as reference materials about a year ago so if you search the forum for AE study you will find the thread, it has good information of how other prepared for the exam. I basically studied by going through the 2nd edition of the practice guide and finding my week points then putting more emphasis on those. I would suggest going through the study guide in detail and writing out all the solutions knowing them inside and out. (there are ever a few questions right from the book, word for word) I also found helpful and old CERM manual that one of the older engineers in my firm gave me, it was dated from 1982 but i found the structural review topics really helpful and the problems were relevant to the type on the exam. I would also suggest absolutely having the NEC Handbook if you can get the full version (I had the 2002 which is sufficient) then I had a great referenece that covers alot of the material on the examwhich I had from college, it is called Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings (just a great overall reference and practical - came in handy in the exam for looking stuff up) I also used a concrete and steel textbook i borrowed off of another engineer (get one that references the ACI and LRFD) These are much easier that paging through the Steel and concrete manuals for the people like me that aren't strong in structures. I also went to the web site engineeringtoolbox to pickup short refreshers on specific topics and get right to the necessary formulas. I printed and organized them by topic then put them in a 3 ring binder (i think most states allow this type of binding just not loose papers - so check with your requirements by state) I learned of the 6 minute solutions after the exam so i wasnt able to have those but i think they would have helped alot.
I ended bringing about 20-25 books into the exam but really only used 5-6 of them.

if anyone has any other quesitons drop me a note or i will check back to this post.
and good luck studying if I can do you all can too!


What "6 minute solutions" are you referring too? I haven't found one for Architectural. I saw your post in the other forum. It was extremely useful. I just finished going through the sample questions and feeling comfortable......I hope.....been out of school since 2001 and haven't taken an exam in 9 years. I have an AET degree from the University of Cincinnati and have found my old reference materials very useful. I purchased an updated Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings and I'm trying to skim through it again before taking the test.

What steel book did you use? We were taught straight from the LRFD and briefly touched on ASD. I was going to purchase "Steel Structures Design: ASD/LRFD" by Alan Williams from Amazon.com as it was pretty new and references the newer additions of the steel manuals.

#7 Nickarus

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Posted 02 April 2011 - 11:41 PM

I've been re-reviewing and making sure everything I can tab from the practice exam (2nd edition) has been tabbed in my references...

I found an error which I think the official addendum missed:

Problem #519's solution tells you the maximum floor area for a given hazard classification covered by a single riser is found in NFPA 13-2007 section 5.2.2.1.

The section they're referring to (and which I'm tabbing) is actually 8.2.1.

I happen to have 2007 and 2010 side-by-side and it's the same for both.

#8 Nickarus

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 09:51 PM

QUOTE (Nickarus @ Apr 2 2011, 06:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I've been re-reviewing and making sure everything I can tab from the practice exam (2nd edition) has been tabbed in my references...

I found an error which I think the official addendum missed:

Problem #519's solution tells you the maximum floor area for a given hazard classification covered by a single riser is found in NFPA 13-2007 section 5.2.2.1.

The section they're referring to (and which I'm tabbing) is actually 8.2.1.

I happen to have 2007 and 2010 side-by-side and it's the same for both.


Hey, in the event anyone in the future stumbles across this and is wondering, I recall another error in the answers regarding the shear calcs for a footing. The specifics elude me right now, but I recall the solution references the wrong depth of concrete below the reinforcement.

My hope is these will help anyone else plowing through the practice exam and/or any of those responsible for issuing addenda to catch these issues.

#9 Nickarus

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 10:00 PM

QUOTE (kbales @ Mar 27 2011, 03:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (archeng1 @ Mar 3 2011, 02:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
hi everyone,
I passed the AE exam in April and it was definitely challenging trying to study for the exam given the limited study prep material.
I have an Architectural Engineering degree but really never worked directly in design, most of my experience is in the field of Construction Management. I found the exam wasn't too bad as far as being familiar with all the questions and having ample time to answer everything except for those few guesses.

I posted in another forum what I used most in the exam as far as reference materials about a year ago so if you search the forum for AE study you will find the thread, it has good information of how other prepared for the exam. I basically studied by going through the 2nd edition of the practice guide and finding my week points then putting more emphasis on those. I would suggest going through the study guide in detail and writing out all the solutions knowing them inside and out. (there are ever a few questions right from the book, word for word) I also found helpful and old CERM manual that one of the older engineers in my firm gave me, it was dated from 1982 but i found the structural review topics really helpful and the problems were relevant to the type on the exam. I would also suggest absolutely having the NEC Handbook if you can get the full version (I had the 2002 which is sufficient) then I had a great referenece that covers alot of the material on the examwhich I had from college, it is called Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings (just a great overall reference and practical - came in handy in the exam for looking stuff up) I also used a concrete and steel textbook i borrowed off of another engineer (get one that references the ACI and LRFD) These are much easier that paging through the Steel and concrete manuals for the people like me that aren't strong in structures. I also went to the web site engineeringtoolbox to pickup short refreshers on specific topics and get right to the necessary formulas. I printed and organized them by topic then put them in a 3 ring binder (i think most states allow this type of binding just not loose papers - so check with your requirements by state) I learned of the 6 minute solutions after the exam so i wasnt able to have those but i think they would have helped alot.
I ended bringing about 20-25 books into the exam but really only used 5-6 of them.

if anyone has any other quesitons drop me a note or i will check back to this post.
and good luck studying if I can do you all can too!


What "6 minute solutions" are you referring too? I haven't found one for Architectural. I saw your post in the other forum. It was extremely useful. I just finished going through the sample questions and feeling comfortable......I hope.....been out of school since 2001 and haven't taken an exam in 9 years. I have an AET degree from the University of Cincinnati and have found my old reference materials very useful. I purchased an updated Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings and I'm trying to skim through it again before taking the test.

What steel book did you use? We were taught straight from the LRFD and briefly touched on ASD. I was going to purchase "Steel Structures Design: ASD/LRFD" by Alan Williams from Amazon.com as it was pretty new and references the newer additions of the steel manuals.


I'm not sure about the 6-minute books (I suppose you could pull one from each discipline but that's surely excessive prepping). I just finished my exam, and can say the recommended references published in the practice exam and available on AEI's website, are pretty spot on. The ASTM Steel manual (mine is 13th ed. - black hardbound cover) was certainly helpful during the test, and doubles as a swingable blunt object if you are attacked by zombies on the way to the testing site.

I'm sitting on my hands till I get my letter, but if everything goes well and I pass, I promise to give a full writeup of what/how I studied, what I brought and how I prepared mentally... but I don't want to count my chickens before they hatch!

#10 shawankie

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 03:23 PM

I just found out that I passed the AE PE in Illinois so I thought I'd share my experience since there is very little study info out there for the exam.

A little about me:

I work for a large architectural firm which has its own in house technology design studio to cover the design of all things low voltage including audiovisual, telecom, security, medical communications, wireless, acoustics, etc... Most of what I do on a daily basis is audiovisual system design with some electrical, mechanical, acoustics and lighting as it relates to my AV systems.

My study prep:

I bought the second edition study guide "Principles and Practice of Engineering: Architectural Engineering Sample Questions and Solutions" in December before the exam and used that as my basis for what the exam would cover. I would say that that guide is a pretty good gauge of what the exam covers and what topics you should be familiar with walking in there. Almost every question was a variation on a theme brought up in that book (as any good reference guide should be). Plus the book gives a good mix of the different types of questions:

1) Pure calculation - find the equation, analyze XYZ and crunch out an answer
2) Code/Standard reference - given XYZ situation find the answer based on some code may include some calculation
3) General AE knowledge - I would normally say there are "experience" questions, but I was able to look up some in the references I had.

I just worked all the problems in the books and wrote down all the fundamental equations used in them, or flagged my reference material based on the question. Google was my friend on some of them where I didn't have a specific reference.

Complete book list that I used and brought into the exam:

NEC Handbook (2005)
IBC (2006)
Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings (11th Edition)
ACI 318
AISC (Steel Construction manual 9th edition)
NDS Nation design spec for Wood Construction
NFPA 101 (life safety code)
Pocket Ref (Thomas Glover)
Ugly's Electrical Reference (2011 edition)

Books I wish I had:

ASCE 7 (Minimum Design Loads for Building)
Civil Engineering Review Manual (Lindenburg)
NFPA 72 (national fire alarm code)
An HVAC text book or reference - some of the ASHRE books might have accomplished this.

I would say that the three most valuable books were the Mech and Elec Equipment for Buildings, the Pocket Ref and the Ugly's Electrical Guide. The Pocket ref and the Ugly's Guide cost a grand total of $25 on Amazon so no one should go without them. I probably used them on at least a third of the questions. the Ugly's guide pulls the most important parts of the NEC and puts them in a quick easy to read format plus has all sorts of useful equations. Same with the pocket ref, it takes the most important look up tables form the other standards and puts it all in one book. I liked the Pocket ref so much after using it to study and in the exam, I bought the full sized Desk Ref to keep at work.

Obviously the code books are important as well because so much of the AE industry is geared towards code compliance. So I would get as many of those on the Reference Material list as you can and just have them in the exam, just in-case.

Hope that helps anyone who is studying if not, feel free to ask any additional questions!

-Dave








#11 LEEDengineer

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 04:08 AM

Great post and congrats!! I just found out I passed too (also AE + Illinois)!!! When I return from vaca I will definitely have to post my rundown and my final list of books. Looks like we wish we had included some of the same books! LOL

#12 Nickarus

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 11:05 PM

***Thread is in progress - this is gonna take a while!***

Hey everyone! I passed, and just got my stamp and new business cards in the mail smile.gif.

Since there's so little out there regarding experiences with the Architectural Engineering (AE) PE exam, I knew from the get-go that I would want to share what did/didn't work for me, regardless of the outcome.

MY BACKGROUND:

I got my bachelors and masters in Kansas State's Architectural Engineering program. That education was a cross-discipline engineering education (electrical, structural, mechanical), with many building-industry specific classes (power, lighting, fire protection, LRFD, HVAC, plumbing, energy codes, estimating, project management and so forth).

After school, I began working for an MEP consulting firm who permitted me to practice cross-discipline design and CA. My day-to-day prior to the PE exam involved mechanical, plumbing, power and lighting design; energy modeling under various contexts(LEED, commissioning, calibration), and project management from start to finish.

The only parts of the exam material which haven't been part of my day-to-day life in my career are the structural topics and rated fire constructions. Everything else I either do on a regular basis or have at least have dabbled in.

STUDY MATERIALS:

Primary study material was the 2nd edition of the Principles and Practice of Engineering - Architectural Engineering practice exam. I also ordered the first edition hoping to double the amount of practice questions to work from, but was dissapointed to find they are largely the same. My advice is to just get the latest edition. Also grab the errata and work those in from the AEI site below, and peruse the forums here for further corrections to the practice exam solutions wink.gif.

Useful Websites:


HOW I STUDIED:

I resolved to photocopy each problem from the practice exam onto a separate sheet. I then wrote out a full solution (and sometimes multiple approaches to the same problem), with references as necessary, on engineering paper. Answers were stapled to each problem, then each problem was sorted by discipline for easy reference in my PE exam binder (i.e. lighting, plumbing, power, HVAC).

Along the way, every time a problem referenced something, even if I didn't need to look it up, I tabbed that reference.

Every time a concept or "fundamentals" came up that I didn't know or was fuzzy on, I hopped onto google and found a good resource illustrating and explaining the topic thoroughly, printed it off, and filed it in my PE binder.

I recognized pretty quickly that if I was weak in any area of the exam, it was definitely structural. I resolved to study all the other topics first, assemble my notes/tabs and complete all the non-structural exam questions before touching anything structural. Then with about a month to go before exam day, I crammed structural solely. I found these forums and google to be my friends in finding problems and solutions similar to each the practice exam brought up. I made sure I was capable of solving each problem on my own, and identified where to look in my structural references for each subtopic. I thoroughly skimmed the contents and retabbed all structural references. There are a LOT of gems that can save much time in the AISC manual for example... more than I remember!

REFERENCES USED ON TEST DAY:

See uploaded picture below - that's the large suitcase I use for international travel... so full I couldn't close the zipper! I referenced all but a few items through the test however:
  1. 3-ring binder of PE reference materials - following post will provide another picture/discussion of its contents
  2. "Nick's Plumbing Handbook" is a continuation of my college notes from plumbing/fire protection classes that I've added to and often referenced in practice. It contains code snippets and journal/manufacturers guidelines for sizing and designing water/waste/steam/gas/vent/medical and other related plumbing systems.
  3. This Binder's title is pretty self-explanatory. I took the full NFPA sections 14, 101, 99, 13 and 72 from our office's loose-leaf reference set. It could mean the difference between a right and wrong answer to bring the right year for each, by the way! Refer to the practice exam's suggested reference list.
  4. The Acoustic Systems is a notebook from a college elective of the same name. Covers various noise criteria, construction acoustic properties, and related formulae.
  5. Generic Engineering Economics text with all the usual formulae
  6. 6
  7. NCEES Principles and Practice of Engineering Structural Engineering I Sample Questions & Solutions
  8. IBC 2003
  9. IPC 2006
  10. ASCE 7-02 : Minimum Design Loads for Building and Other Structures
  11. NFPA 72 - 2002: National Fire Alarm Code. Brought this as this is the version I studied in school, and it has all my tabs/margin notes.
  12. ASHRAE Principles of Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (Red cover, based on 2001 Fundamentals)
  13. The four ASHRAE Handbooks: Fundamentals, Refrigeration, Applications, Systems
  14. (see above)
  15. (see above... and I cannot count to 4 apparently... to lazy to fire up mspaint again!)
  16. IESNA Lighting Handbook 9th ed.
  17. NEC 2008
  18. ASHRAE/IESNA/ANSI Standard 90.1-2007
  19. ACI 318-05: Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete and commentary
  20. ANSI/AF&PA NDS-1997: National Design Specification for wood construction, and supplement
  21. Text: Structural Design in Wood, 2nd edition, Stalnaker
  22. "Engineering Dictionary" a colleague suggested I borrow - I didn't need it
  23. AISC Steel Manual (13th edition)

    WHAT ELSE DID I BRING ON TEST DAY?:

    Straight edge, approved calculator, orange Gatorade, Chex Mix, lunch box (though a surprise lunch was provided), light jacket, wallet with ID, google map of directions to the testing center.

    WHAT DID I LEAVE IN MY CAR?:

    Cell phone, coffee... emptied my pockets, and kept only my car keys and wallet/ID.

    HOW DID IT GO?

    I finished the last problem of the morning portion in a little over 2 hours... lots of time to spare. I used another hour to review dog-eared problems where I felt I could use a confirmation from one of my references, and to re-work all problems that involved a calculation... just to double check for user-error - this resulted in a few changed answers. With an hour left to go, and feeling hungry for lunch, I think I was the 2nd person out the door.

    The afternoon session was rougher, with more than a few problems requiring some "reference perusal." I used all 4 hours in the afternoon, until it was called for pencils to drop, but I had time to at least attempt to work all problems. Ultimately, I think there no more than 3 or 4 problems where I had to fall back to an educated guess (trying to eliminating one or more options first).

    Opening the letter that arrived was dreadful... I really no longer cared about passing - I just wanted to never take that test again! Fortunately the results provided some much needed relief!

    ***Thread is in progress - this is gonna take a while!***

Attached Files


Edited by Nickarus, 09 June 2011 - 11:40 PM.


#13 Nickarus

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Posted 09 June 2011 - 11:29 PM

**reserving post #2 for a continuation with another snapshot of my PE binder's contents**

#14 bkeefer01

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 12:55 AM

I work for an MEP firm (provides services for a variety of architectural projects) and I am hoping to take the PE exam in April 2012 in order to improve my standing in the company. I currently work as an electrical engineer, but I studied Architectural engineering in university so I seem to have a fair shot at passing both types of PE exam. At first glance, the Electrical PE is the most logical choice due to the relevancy to my job....

...however, I'm curious, what are the advantages to getting an Architectural PE, if any? I understand that I would get the same PE stamp with the AE PE as with the EE PE, but I heard that there are some jurisdictions that specifically require an EE PE to stamp electrical drawings, i.e. DC.

Any opinions of the career net worth of each type of PE would be GREATLY appreciated!!

Any thoughts?

#15 gte621n

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 04:36 PM

I also work for an MEP firm and work as an Electrical Engineer. My undegraduate degree is in Aerospace Engineering and I also have work experience doing Mechanical and Plumbing design. I decided that the best option for me was the Architectural PE exam rather than the EE - Power exam. The Architectural PE Exam seems seems to be right on par with what most MEP firms deal with on a regular basis except for the Structural portion of the exam, which is 25% of the exam. I don't have any real-world working Structural experience but I took plenty of Structural courses in college to feel like it could sit for the exam. I passed the Architectural PE Exam last spring. In the end, I think you have to decide which one is right for you. I'd suggest buying the NCEES EE - Power practice test and the AEI Architectural Engineering practice test and flip through them to see which test you feel is right for you. In Ohio, there is no distinction between PE stamps so I wasn't worried about being able to sign drawings. I think that the Architectural PE Exam is still fairly new to the engineering community, but I see it growing more and more popular in the near future. The AEI website shows that 49 states and Puerto Rico accept the Architectural PE Exam, the only one that currently does not is Vermont. (http://content.aeins.../map-state2.jpg)

I am pretty confident that it doesn't matter which exam you take, the Architectural or Electrical PE exam, your career will be given a boost but ultimately it will reflect how good of an engineer you really are, not the letters after your name.

Good luck with taking the exam.



#16 bkeefer01

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 04:58 PM

Thanks, I will definitely buy both practice exams for comparison. Can I ask what study books you used to take the test?

I am just curious though if anyone has any experience with an employer preferring one type of PE over the other. Does anyone have any good and bad experiences that would provide some clarity? In addition to Vermont, I heard that DC requires an electrical stamp. Are other states potentially heading this direction??



#17 bkeefer01

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Posted 10 September 2011 - 04:52 AM

I know that I am early, but is anyone planning or thinking of taking the Architectural PE exam in April 2012??

I want to ask because I want to develop a network of support, especially since there are so few of us taking the exam.

And definitely a longshot, but is there anyone planning on taking the exam in Maryland? I am also wondering if any of you who took the exam in 2011 are still visiting this forum.... If you are in the DC-VA-MD or PA areas, interested in selling me some of your books? PM me if you are interested.

Brian

#18 Nickarus

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 06:15 PM

QUOTE (bkeefer01 @ Aug 9 2011, 11:58 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks, I will definitely buy both practice exams for comparison. Can I ask what study books you used to take the test?

I am just curious though if anyone has any experience with an employer preferring one type of PE over the other. Does anyone have any good and bad experiences that would provide some clarity? In addition to Vermont, I heard that DC requires an electrical stamp. Are other states potentially heading this direction??


There are a number of 'discipline-specific' states incl. CA/NV/ID... - I think you can tell reliably by whether the seal says something generic like "professional engineer" or specific like "electrical."

In practice, my work before and after the exam is about 50/50 mechanical/electrical, and for smaller projects I'll often cover all disciplines, so the AE PE made a lot of sense from a "what I do" standpoint. That said, I had the same concerns regarding inter-state licensure. While some states are 'discipline specific (CA/NV/ID... etc),' I don't think they will all necessarily have a problem with the AE stamp. I believe the bigger issue is whether the state recognizes the AE P.E. exam at all... there's a link to a map showing who doesn't on the AEI website - I'm not sure whether it's kept current: http://www.aeinstitu...ing/pe_exam.cfm

I'd encourage you to get your employer's opinion on the matter if they have one - in the immediate term their input might have a reasonable impact on your decision. My employer emphatically told me from the company's perspective, "a PE is a PE is a PE." Considering most states do recognize the AE PE now (see map in above link), and that list logically should grow in time so long as the body of AE Professionals grows and develops a larger voice, the only reason someone with appropriate experience/background would want to shy away is if they're going to be required to stamp drawings in states that aren't recognizing the seal.

You might inquire ahead and find that you won't be required/expected to seal drawings for some time... office politics may make it something of a non-issue for you as well.

If you pursue the AE exam - I have another post around here somewhere detailing my references... I need to finish that writeup but a good portion of it is there.

Edited by Nickarus, 12 September 2011 - 06:19 PM.


#19 Nickarus

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 02:46 PM

QUOTE
...Well I can't seem to edit my 2nd post - must be b/c i waited so long? If any moderators can move these contents up one or 'unlock' those posts for editing that'd be nice =).




Moving on: Attached is a snapshot of my bound reference binder. Creating this was part of my prep for the exam, and in practice I turned to this reference as often as any other resource during the test.

It's hard to capture everything in a single photo, but here's a description of its final contents, front to back:
  • NCEES notice letter with information needed to enter and take the exam.
  • The first row of green tabs is a "filtered" set of topics from the current FE reference handbook (accessible as a large PDF on the NCEES website). This was included as an afterthought almost, to potentially fill in any gaps in the fundamentals I didn't think to include in my studies. If you're going to include this, you'll save time doing it later as you probably won't be familiar with what is/isn't really going to be covered in the exam until you've studied the PPE practice exam thoroughly.
  • After that are select AIA contract documents: A201, G701, C141, & B141. Don't recall actually using these much, but seemed relevant material from the practice exam.
  • Following are a set of tabs that organize notes, collections of equations/diagrams, highlighted articles, and basically anything I had to google along the way studying the practice exam. The topics are organized as: Electrical, Mechanical, Structural, PM/CA/Other. Examples include reference sheets for college course finals for select topics, wikipedia articles, a collection of economics equations/tables, and fully worked examples of lighting/HVAC/power problems that weren't included in the practice exam (college notebooks were invaluable in this dept).
  • The next tab was not really used at all, but was the result of planning around 'the worst case' for testing day. This contains copies of every piece of correspondence regarding applying for the exam, exam specifications, forms submitted to my state's board, definitions in the state bylaws concerning eligibility/experience... basically trying to cover any possibility of my eligibility or ability to take the exam coming under question. I wish I could advise to not worry about this, but mistakes do happen and I expect it's a possibility that someone could be stopped at the door because a number-cruncher somewhere typed a letter of your name wrong into the system. Better to be prepared just in case!
  • Finally, the last section of this binder contains the most useful and pertinent thing I did to prep for the test. Here's what I did:

  1. Found a good block of time with a copier, then copied/cut/paste/copied each problem from the practice exam onto an individual, separate page (using canary colored paper for clarity).
  2. Then, I went through each problem, skimmed it, and sorted the canary pages by topic. The categories are M, E, P, S and Misc.
  3. Worked each problem by topic as a group COMPLETELY and neatly. I worked on engineering paper and stapled any work to the problem at hand.
  4. Anytime a reference was necessary for me to complete something, I made notes of what I looked up and where to solve the problem, on the problem.
  5. Anytime I recognized a problem could be solved by more than one approach, I solved it EACH way. This helped me remember on test day when a "fast" approach would be appropriate, and when an alternate approach is handy for checking your answer.
  6. I later went back - there were a number of problems I simply "knew" the answers to, but I tried to put myself into the shoes of someone clueless and identified a reference so I might know where to look for similar info.


During the test, these worked problems were REALLY handy. Many actual exam questions were very similar to the practice problems in content/procedure, just with different numbers, and organizing them by subject matter meant I wasn't wasting time flipping around the practice exam booklet trying to confirm things I was 90% sure of.

As a generalization, for "worked" problems involving multiple steps to find an answer, I would characterize many (but not all) of the practice exam questions as slightly more complex than their actual exam counterparts. I hesitate to even write that, because there were certainly some complex problems to be found (for me mainly in the afternoon session), but keeping your nerves in check is an important part of test taking and it may help some keep their cool while studying and waiting for the clock to start. What I'd take away from this is, if you can get to a point where you feel 100% comfortable understanding and solving any particular problem, you may well be 110% confident on test day when you see the same sort of problem, so I'd move on to the next topic/problem once you're comfy and avoid "over studying" any specific problem.

Hmm can't seem to 'attach' like the first post either... wonder what's up? Anyway here's the image uploaded to postimage.org - hopefully this doesn't expire before someone needs it:


#20 Wildsoldier PE

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 08:46 PM



laugh.gif

OH MY GOD, all that reference material...you even took an Scale with you!

QUOTE (Nickarus @ Sep 13 2011, 10:46 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE
...Well I can't seem to edit my 2nd post - must be b/c i waited so long? If any moderators can move these contents up one or 'unlock' those posts for editing that'd be nice =).




Moving on: Attached is a snapshot of my bound reference binder. Creating this was part of my prep for the exam, and in practice I turned to this reference as often as any other resource during the test.

It's hard to capture everything in a single photo, but here's a description of its final contents, front to back:
  • NCEES notice letter with information needed to enter and take the exam.
  • The first row of green tabs is a "filtered" set of topics from the current FE reference handbook (accessible as a large PDF on the NCEES website). This was included as an afterthought almost, to potentially fill in any gaps in the fundamentals I didn't think to include in my studies. If you're going to include this, you'll save time doing it later as you probably won't be familiar with what is/isn't really going to be covered in the exam until you've studied the PPE practice exam thoroughly.
  • After that are select AIA contract documents: A201, G701, C141, & B141. Don't recall actually using these much, but seemed relevant material from the practice exam.
  • Following are a set of tabs that organize notes, collections of equations/diagrams, highlighted articles, and basically anything I had to google along the way studying the practice exam. The topics are organized as: Electrical, Mechanical, Structural, PM/CA/Other. Examples include reference sheets for college course finals for select topics, wikipedia articles, a collection of economics equations/tables, and fully worked examples of lighting/HVAC/power problems that weren't included in the practice exam (college notebooks were invaluable in this dept).
  • The next tab was not really used at all, but was the result of planning around 'the worst case' for testing day. This contains copies of every piece of correspondence regarding applying for the exam, exam specifications, forms submitted to my state's board, definitions in the state bylaws concerning eligibility/experience... basically trying to cover any possibility of my eligibility or ability to take the exam coming under question. I wish I could advise to not worry about this, but mistakes do happen and I expect it's a possibility that someone could be stopped at the door because a number-cruncher somewhere typed a letter of your name wrong into the system. Better to be prepared just in case!
  • Finally, the last section of this binder contains the most useful and pertinent thing I did to prep for the test. Here's what I did:

  1. Found a good block of time with a copier, then copied/cut/paste/copied each problem from the practice exam onto an individual, separate page (using canary colored paper for clarity).
  2. Then, I went through each problem, skimmed it, and sorted the canary pages by topic. The categories are M, E, P, S and Misc.
  3. Worked each problem by topic as a group COMPLETELY and neatly. I worked on engineering paper and stapled any work to the problem at hand.
  4. Anytime a reference was necessary for me to complete something, I made notes of what I looked up and where to solve the problem, on the problem.
  5. Anytime I recognized a problem could be solved by more than one approach, I solved it EACH way. This helped me remember on test day when a "fast" approach would be appropriate, and when an alternate approach is handy for checking your answer.
  6. I later went back - there were a number of problems I simply "knew" the answers to, but I tried to put myself into the shoes of someone clueless and identified a reference so I might know where to look for similar info.


During the test, these worked problems were REALLY handy. Many actual exam questions were very similar to the practice problems in content/procedure, just with different numbers, and organizing them by subject matter meant I wasn't wasting time flipping around the practice exam booklet trying to confirm things I was 90% sure of.

As a generalization, for "worked" problems involving multiple steps to find an answer, I would characterize many (but not all) of the practice exam questions as slightly more complex than their actual exam counterparts. I hesitate to even write that, because there were certainly some complex problems to be found (for me mainly in the afternoon session), but keeping your nerves in check is an important part of test taking and it may help some keep their cool while studying and waiting for the clock to start. What I'd take away from this is, if you can get to a point where you feel 100% comfortable understanding and solving any particular problem, you may well be 110% confident on test day when you see the same sort of problem, so I'd move on to the next topic/problem once you're comfy and avoid "over studying" any specific problem.

Hmm can't seem to 'attach' like the first post either... wonder what's up? Anyway here's the image uploaded to postimage.org - hopefully this doesn't expire before someone needs it:




#21 Nickarus

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 10:20 PM

QUOTE (Wildsoldier @ Sep 13 2011, 03:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
laugh.gif

OH MY GOD, all that reference material...you even took an Scale with you!


I even used that scale solving a problem adding power triangles to avoid the trig calcs wink.gif!

What I found funny is - I really did use almost everything at least once, and you could pretty easily tell who was taking the AE PE in the crowd because we were the pack mules carrying crates/shelves/mini-libraries around in some form or fashion. I was shocked to see most other disciplines only came with a small backpack or box with fraction of the reference materials... I guess it illustrates the AE PE is very much focused on breadth? I didn't even bring the full list of recommended references in the PPofE exam booklet =).

Hope all this helps others since there's so little real materials to go off of smile.gif!

#22 Nickarus

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Posted 18 September 2011 - 07:21 PM

Following is the tail-end of a PM conversation I had recently... probably might help someone else out there and Brian agreed he'd be okay with posting this publicly wink.gif:

QUOTE
Nickarus,

Thanks for your quick and informative reply.

Quick question, did you have to make much use of "Nick's Plumbing Book"? Were there many plumbing questions on the exam? I thought that was a good idea to make your own book based on college notes, but I don't have such a background. Nor do I have experience practicing plumbing.

I have bought the PP&E study guide and I will study it as close as you recommend. I do want to get the majority of reference materials as well. So did you buy all of the reference materials that you mentioned on your list? Wasn't that expensive? I am hoping to find some at the library and to photocopy crucial sections. What do you think?

Thanks again!

Brian



Hey Brian,

"Nick's Plumbing Book" is something I didn't use much in the exam, though much of its contents are in my day-to-day memory. What I did use I think could be found in the IPC/IMC as well.

The distribution of the exam you'll take so far as subject matter goes is probably a toss up, but like the practice exam I think mine was pretty evenly divided between HVAC, plumbing, electrical power/lighting, structural, envelope construction, and construction practices/miscellaneous stuff. No one discipline or area of subject matter stood out as dominant.

I bought a number of these texts back in college, but didn't buy much in preparation for the PE... I borrowed all of the wood structural references from a friend, and much of the NFPA/International code series/ASHRAE texts were simply borrowed from colleagues at work and our code library at work.

Photocopying key sections for each reference sounds great and is better than nothing, but my impression is that the exam is set up in part to test your familiarity with what's covered in the recommended references... sometimes the trick is not to know a 20 step process to determine the flow rate through a pipe given tons of pertinent/irrelevant variables, but rather to know there's a table in the IPC that makes it a 1-step process.


#23 DaveW

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Posted 19 September 2011 - 06:00 AM

huh....first I've ever heard of a Architectural Engineering PE. Tried reading about it online, but I can't figure out what they do exactly.

#24 Nickarus

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Posted 19 September 2011 - 06:10 PM

QUOTE (DaveW @ Sep 19 2011, 01:00 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
huh....first I've ever heard of a Architectural Engineering PE. Tried reading about it online, but I can't figure out what they do exactly.


I can't answer for everybody's job description or motivations, but I can share my personal perspective/thoughts: AE PE's are generally individuals who are (A) working somewhere in the building construction industry and (cool.gif who are to some extent "cross-discipline" in practice.

The AE PE exam is unique in that each question is specific/applicable to engineering within the commercial building/construction industry.

Our engineering design and skillsets are not limited to any single discipline. I can run loads, size HVAC/plumbing equipment, pipe/duct everything up, select and lay out lighting fixtures power/telecomm outlets, draw up risers and control schematics for all trades, and assemble the specs. I'm versed in NEC, common building codes, energy and ventilation standards, and so forth. That said, I do not touch structural with a 39.5ft pole, except on rare occasions where a quick reference to my steel manual can provide general guidance.

In practice, I will cover all MEP trades for smaller projects, but will commonly split the work with one or more other designers for larger/complex projects. For example, I'll take on the role of "the electrical" a given project and focus on that piece of the pie, allowing me to devote more time and attention to afford a more complex design. The trades I pick up for any given project varies with the individual(s) I'm working with and what holes need to be filled.

An AE PE is likely NOT designing utility power plants or chiller internals. We're not sealing drawings for a suspension bridge. There are projects in the broader building/construction industry that do require a specialist, and it's on us (as with every PE) to follow the NSPE code of ethics and only seal/sign items falling under our area of competence.

Our cross-discipline background definitely helps us in certain aspects including energy modeling, project management, CA, and design coordination meetings.

I recall from my job-hunt years ago that some employers actually discourage cross-discipline experience/practice in all or part of their workforce ("you're either mechanical OR electrical"). I suppose in such an environment/culture you'd have an uphill battle to pursue or even consider a multi-discipline license. If you reside or do most of your work in one of the states who doesn't yet recognize the AE PE, I could see that turning you away as well.

I don't have the life-experience yet to know how everything might turn out, but I anticipate my past and on-going cross-discipline CA/project management experience one day will not hurt my chances at climbing to an upper management role.

Again, this is just one young PE's view of the situation. I'm certain individual experiences and circumstances drive others to pursue the AE PE (or not), but for me it seems the best fit as it's the exam whose contents most closely match my actual areas of competence and practice, in addition to my future career goals. I live & work in a state which recognizes the AE PE, which I suppose helps from a marketing perspective, but I continue to design for projects all over the country in states who do and don't recognize the AE PE (in which case an ME and/or EE in our office can review and seal my work).

As an aside: I've noted through wikipedia that the term "Architectural engineering" means very different things as you cross borders into other countries - I gather building engineering of all disciplines and general architecture practice can be one and the same thing in Japan, for example.

#25 DaveW

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Posted 20 September 2011 - 06:12 PM

Sounds like a move for architecture go back to Master Builder Status. In hindsight it also looks like a Jack of all trades role. Is it possible to have expertise in all fields?

I have a degree in architecture, and have been getting experience at it, but I've also been doing alot of what you describe the past 3 years. Some of it in an Engineering firm setting, and most of it on a military installation setting.

I never knew it could be considered architectural engineering.

While at the same time, I'm learning and studying how contracts work, meeting with contractors, negotiating pricing, determining risks, understanding how bonding, substantial completion, final completion, project closeout, time frames for deliverable, cost estimating, and on and on. I'm taking the A.R.E. as we speak.

Interestingly, I took on my current job, thinking it was an architect position, when in fact it's an architectural engineering position. So now I know thanks to this board. Very few architects out there that I meet have a technical background.

At the same time, I do have to argue that the engineers do have a tendency to make things look horrific. I guess that's why army bases have a bad reputation - they've been planned and designed by engineers for way too long.

#26 mytony

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 12:36 AM

I have not enough time to prepare for my examine. so i have to squeeze time to study.

#27 bartlettj

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Posted 28 November 2011 - 07:31 PM

Hey Brian... I am taking the Architectural PE exam in Delaware in April 2012.

#28 bkeefer01

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 05:42 AM

Wow, it's great to hear from someone! How long have you been studying for the exam? I guess that I started in late September. I've been mostly studying MEP from the M&E Equipment for Buildings book up to this point. How about you? Have you found a good study technique?

Anyways, are you also an AE like me? From where and when did you graduate? I was Penn State AE '02.

Brian

#29 alora

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 10:36 PM

huh....first I've ever heard of a Architectural Engineering PE. Tried reading about it online, but I can't figure out what they do exactly.


Double-check your state's statutes and/or rules.

Arizona has a specific definition for what Architectural Engineering entails.

I am also attempting to get my AE PE license, and it seems to be relatively easy since I'm already an architect. Someone at the state board mentioned that architects typically get involved in all disciplines. Not that that is the prerequisite, but since AE PE is still relatively new, they're reviewing everyone's qualifications on a case-by-case basis.

Especially with those individuals who have no college experience.

#30 alora

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Posted 28 December 2011 - 10:37 PM

Sounds like a move for architecture go back to Master Builder Status. ...


Bingo.

Next up after AE PE is my GC license.

#31 Atlasflasher

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 02:32 PM

I am taking the AE PE in April in NJ. My email address is atlasshruggedoff@yahoo.com of you are interested in a study group. I am also researching study materials to purchase.

#32 Atlasflasher

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 06:33 PM

To date here is a list of the study materials I researched and have bought. Some of them came form the list pf references in the A/E Principles and Practices.
  • PE Mechanical: HVAC and Refrigeration Sample Questions and Solutions
  • Principles and Practice of Engineering Architectural Engineering Sample Questions and Solutions
  • Standard Handbook of Architectural Engineering
  • 2012 International Building Code
  • 2012 International Mechanical Code
  • National Electrical Code 2008 (National Fire Protection Association)
  • Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings
  • Civil engineering reference manual
  • 4 ASHRAE HANDBOOKS 84-91 IP EDITION 1984 Systems1986 Refrigeration1989 Fundamentals1991 Applications
I feel confident I have decent basis of reference materials.

BKeefer01 is interested in an online study group using this forum. If Bartlett J wants to join, you are more than welcome.

At this point, I am reviewing the sample ??? to determine where I need to concentrate. Structural and Electrical are my key areas to focus on for now.

#33 Atlasflasher

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 09:41 PM

Great information! Thank you very much!

#34 Atlasflasher

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 09:43 PM

http://engineerboard...showtopic=16252

This topic is a must read for the A/E Test.

#35 bkeefer01

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Posted 08 February 2012 - 04:29 AM

Questions for previous test takers!


In the practice exam book, there are some questions such as 107, 505, and 506 that depend on excerpts/tables from the various resource books of the AEI-published resource list (most commonly found seems to be ASCE 7).

My first question is whether the excerpts/tables are printed along with the problem on the actual exam just as it is in the practice exam book. Or do we have to make sure to bring all of the reference books with us and the question on the actual exam will only make reference to the book without printing the excerpt? I ask this because I was wondering if I really have to track down and bring all of the books on the reference list.

My second question....So does this mean that, for example, you brought the entire ASCE 7 manual with you to the exam or just a few photocopied excerpts.


Brian

#36 wheatmaster

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 03:32 AM

What did you do to study for the structural portion of the exam? It's my weakest area so I'd like to focus on that.

Has anyone looked into purchasing the NCEES Civil Structural Practice problems?

This is what I get for specializing in Environmental when I studied my AE degree....haha.

#37 bkeefer01

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 05:30 AM

Please don't read this if you plan to go through the Principles and Practice of Engineering book all at once like a practice exam.

But I'm sorry, I don't understand and reservedly disagree with the answer found in the back of this book for problem #108:

108. The term for the ratio of the Luminance leaving a surface area to the illuminance arriving on the surface is:

a. Exitance
b. Transmittance Factor
c. Luminance Factor
d. Luminous Flux

Option d deals with the amount of emanating from a source, so that is out.

My first thought is that the answer was exitance, which is a measure of light leaving a surface. But then I realized that it wasn't a ratio of leaving to arriving luminance. Still quite unsure, I deduced it might have to be either transmittance or luminance factor. The problem is that the word "leaving" is quite ambiguous and even though I have checked the answer in the back of the book to be c, I can't explain why.

Does any have sound logic on this issue that will help me gain confidence to move past this problem?

#38 linuxpenguin

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 07:16 PM

Sounds like a poorly worded question honestly. "C" is a ratio under ideal circumstances, and that's not specified in the quesiton; whereas "A" is more defined as the ability to emit radiation. "C" would be the "most correct" answer, albeit the question is flawed.


Simply my 2 cents, nothing more.

#39 dstaller

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 08:57 PM

I'd also recommend "simplified engineering for architects and builders, 11th ed." and "foundation design, principles and practices, 2nd ed.". Almost every structural problem in the AEI practice exam I could find a reference for in the simplified text.


- Dave
Philadelphia, PA
(taking NY AE PE)

#40 dstaller

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 09:05 PM

Anyone out there have any insight into this question? I see what they're doing, but wanted to understand better why they calculate the area the way they did.


Thanks,


- Dave
Philadelphia, PA

#41 simpatique

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 08:29 PM

Flux is defined as flow per unit area , Exitance is M Lumens per square meters . Since the question is about ratio ( unitless ) A and D are impossible . Between transmitance , transmitance (rate) sounds like the best answer However ZEN MASTER once said : when the light leave a room the room gets dark and when the light returns to the room luminates again ! Rate of light / no light. Luminous (lumiere) rate light to no light is the correct answer.
Bullshit ? well , maybe

#42 bkeefer01

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 03:08 AM

April 2012, Maryland

So, how did everyone fare?  Thoughts, opinions, horror stories..please do tell.

I personally have no idea if I passed or not, especially being a first-time test taker. For any of you repeat takers, do you feel it was easier or more difficult than the previous time?

Brian

#43 andyrich

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 04:01 PM

I think he mentioned in the post that he used what was formerly the Structural I NCEES sample exam. The NCEES civil/ structural depth sample exam will give you the same effect, though, and it will be current with codes.

Also, this was a great post that Nick put together summarizing what works in terms of preparing for the PE Exam. Thanks!

#44 butch81385

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 01:52 PM

Anyone else taking the April 2013 AE PE? What books are you studying? Want to form an online study group?

#45 elminses

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 09:30 PM

I took the PE Power for the second time last friday. I'm an electrical construction consulting engineer. The Power exam goes way to much into depth of the inter working of Power equipment. If I don't pass it this time I will be taking AE PE this spring. I'm interested in an online study group, as well as knowing what reference materials are to be used.

#46 Trademark04

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 03:05 PM

I was wondering if anyone utilized or has purchased the ARE Review Manuel and if this was of any benefit

#47 Trademark04

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 07:02 PM

I plan on taking it. I'm not really sure what study materials to utilize. It seems there is a reference guide for every exam out there but the AE. The following thread was linked in the 2012 AE PE exam thread. Take a look for study materials.

http://engineerboard...showtopic=16252

#48 Nickarus

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 05:31 PM

What did you do to study for the structural portion of the exam? It's my weakest area so I'd like to focus on that.

Has anyone looked into purchasing the NCEES Civil Structural Practice problems?

This is what I get for specializing in Environmental when I studied my AE degree....haha.

 

 

Sorry to be responding so late (I'm sure you've passed by now!), but I chanced across this thread again today after hearing from an old friend on the boards!  Maybe I can fill in a little more...

 

For those looking at the AE PE today, to the best of my recollection, I studied "hardest" for the structural portion as well, as structural design was not and continues to not be a part of my day-to-day.  I've already outlined above how I separated all the practice exam questions by subject matter, then methodically solved and documented the solution to each problem as a group.  That is probably the best study advice I can offer.  As might be expected, I spent the longest time going through the "structural" stack of questions, because I did need to identify and look up appropriate references for many of the problems. 

 

In addition to studying this way, I recall recognizing the AISC Steel construction manual itself has a lot of great reference charts (much of which we did not explicitly cover in class), so I took some time to run through that text, re-tab everything I thought was important in college, and scanned for additional useful-looking textual explanations and tables/charts.  I'm not certain that did much for me on test day, but I recall some of the hardest structural questions had me grabbing my steel manual to confirm equations.

 

I cannot recall purchasing any additional study materials I haven't already mentioned/listed.  When I was looking for additional questions similar to what was in the practice exam, I found quite a bit just googling around, and within discussions on these boards as well.  Usually searching for a specific formula or concept used in a problem will lead you to example problems using that idea.

 

Also, this is a while later but I see at least one of my photos above is no longer working (and I still can't see an option to edit old posts - would like to trim out that "temporary text" in the first few if possible), so here again are the photos I posted of my suitcase/references (numbered), and the contents of my test binder:

Attached Files



#49 butch81385

butch81385

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 06:13 PM

So, if you are reading this, you are preparing for the Architectural Engineering PE exam and have realized that there are few resources available.  I went through the same thing.  To help out any future exam-takers, I decided to blog about what I did when, what I found useful, etc.  

 

The blog is located here: www.aepeexam.blogspot.com.  In about 2 months I will either be adding topics regarding what to do after you pass, or covering how to re-apply and what to do for your second time around....

 

Hope it helps, and feel free to ask any questions!

 

 



#50 ARE E

ARE E

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 04:34 PM

I'm thinking of taking the AE PE. I'm looking for specification on what makes people eligilbe to take this PE? For some reason I keep getting the feeling that one is required to have a PE in another disapline prior to taking the AE PE, kinda like the SE. Many thanks for any advise. Note: I'm about a year out from being eligible to take a PE.






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