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Level of math of the PE


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#1 zbest1966

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 11:15 AM

mf_followthroughfart.gifI have been out of school for awhile need to refresh my math skill. Whats the expected level of math skills for the PE

#2 VTEnviro

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 12:45 PM

Some of that will be dependent on which exam you take...

Definitely be sharp on your algebra, geomertry, and trig.

#3 navyasw02

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 02:01 PM

Mostly algebra. You wont need to derive anything or do PDEs.

#4 snickerd3

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 02:08 PM

you are only allowed a scientific calculator, so if it is more difficult than that you are pretty safe it is not test worthy.





#5 z06dustin

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 02:47 PM

I think the math required to do this problems is all you should worry about, not specific math equations. If you can do your practice problems; you can do the math req'd to pass the PE.

YMMV.

#6 PA_Mining_Engr

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 05:19 PM

Off topic for a sec - likin' the avatar dustin! Gotta love engineering humor....

#7 z06dustin

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 05:33 PM

QUOTE (PA_Mining_Engr @ Oct 7 2010, 10:19 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Off topic for a sec - likin' the avatar dustin! Gotta love engineering humor....


haha I'm here for your entertainment!


#8 wilheldp_PE

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 07:26 PM

If you don't understand dustin's avatar, then you are going to have trouble on the electrical exam.

#9 navyasw02

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 08:29 PM

Dont EE's use j instead of i?

#10 benbo

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 08:41 PM

QUOTE (navyasw02 @ Oct 5 2010, 06:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Dont EE's use j instead of i?

In general I'd say you are correct, but we can use both, depending on what the subject is. Generally, if you are in a subject area (like power) where you are likely to see i used a lot for current, you will use j for the imaginary number. But if you are doing work in other areas, it may not be as important. There can also be confusion because J can mean current density, although I think they generlly use capital J for that.

So it depends on the context to figure out what it means.

But I guess you are correct, in which case dustin's avatar would mean "old school-" or "not current".

#11 z06dustin

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 10:18 PM

QUOTE (benbo @ Oct 7 2010, 01:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (navyasw02 @ Oct 5 2010, 06:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Dont EE's use j instead of i?

In general I'd say you are correct, but we can use both, depending on what the subject is. Generally, if you are in a subject area (like power) where you are likely to see i used a lot for current, you will use j for the imaginary number. But if you are doing work in other areas, it may not be as important. There can also be confusion because J can mean current density, although I think they generlly use capital J for that.

So it depends on the context to figure out what it means.

But I guess you are correct, in which case dustin's avatar would mean "old school-" or "not current".


I'm reavealing my nerdyness here... but I've used that on other boards, and only EEs would get it if I used j. This way we all can share in the fun. multiplespotting.gif

#12 SSmith

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 07:16 PM

QUOTE (wilheldp_PE @ Oct 7 2010, 02:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If you don't understand dustin's avatar, then you are going to have trouble on the electrical exam.

But if a null set contains i, then how is it a null set? wink.gif

#13 jim_

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 08:18 PM

QUOTE (SSmith @ Oct 8 2010, 03:16 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (wilheldp_PE @ Oct 7 2010, 02:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If you don't understand dustin's avatar, then you are going to have trouble on the electrical exam.

But if a null set contains i, then how is it a null set? wink.gif


Wishful thinking?

http://en.wikipedia....disambiguation)



#14 Phothewesoups

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 05:07 PM

I wear Bridesmaid Dresses




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