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jritter58

EPA CFR 40 and 29

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Should I take these to the exam? They are an an aweful lot to print!

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ALL of 40 CFR??? An official version (in small print) takes up an entire bookshelf in my office. Can't rememebr now what 29 CFR was - was that the DOT haszmat transpo regs? If so, that was just one volume. Or the OSHA regs referenced in the ENVRM? They're not large, either, so you might as well.

No. You do not need to take everything. While you will probably run into a question or two that you could answer from the CFR, they should be "important" enough qurestions that you should be able to answer it from one of your references (e.g., questions about sampling methods, hazardous waste determinations, etc.). But if you have space, take a good guess at the CFR volumes that would be most useful, and maybe bring them. I think I brought the RCRA regs that cover haz waste classification, all nicely tabbed, and the DOT regs. But I am pretty sure I did not use them (not saying there weren't questions on the exam, but that my "textbook" references, or even memory, were good enough). And but of course, I had a question that I could have answered from one of the other 40 CFR volumes I chose to leave at home. But to be honest, I am pretty sure that one could have also been found somewhere in my text book references as well, if I had just known where to look.

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Thanks for the input! I have at least one good reference for each area and the NC State class. I think I should be covered but was curious if the regs were a gotta have for the exam. I work in hydraulics right now so I am brushing up on my air and hazmat and I feel that the qualitative questions are going to be scarier than any design questions.

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I would recommend the Environmental Law Handbook. I took this with me. It covers all the biggies (RCRA, Cercla, CWA, CAA) in a good and concise manner. I think I was able to answer 4 or 5 questions from this reference.

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Cool....I still have that one from Grad School. Are the lookups as hard as I think they will be or are they doable with the right references?

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As long as you can find things in your references under near-panic conditions. Maybe practice finding some strange sampling technique or contaminant first - using the indexes.

Of course it helps if you know your references, but even after 16 years in the business (at the time) and a lot of studying, I still found myself lost on a few of them, digging through the indexes...

But I don't want to scare you. Generally, the oddball questions are not terribly deep. As long as you have the right references, as you say, you can find them. Whether you will find them is a different matter....

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As long as you can find things in your references under near-panic conditions. Maybe practice finding some strange sampling technique or contaminant first - using the indexes.

Of course it helps if you know your references, but even after 16 years in the business (at the time) and a lot of studying, I still found myself lost on a few of them, digging through the indexes...

But I don't want to scare you. Generally, the oddball questions are not terribly deep. As long as you have the right references, as you say, you can find them. Whether you will find them is a different matter....

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OK I will practice hunting stuff in the books. What percent would you say that I should expect as qualitative vs. quantitative? I am getting down to the point that I am studying whenever I have a free minute. I am even going to listen to the NC State lectures on an 8 hour drive to Atlanta tomorrow! I am going to sit my laptop in the passenger seat (pointed away for legal purposes) and pull over to switch CDs!

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As I recall, maybe 60% of the exam was quantitative, and 40% qualitative. Or at least, that's how it seemed!

I think the only way to prepare for the qualitative questions is to just read as much as you can. But your only chance of passing rests with how well you can do on the quantitative questions, so you need to be practicing those as much as you can so you can get fast at finding what's asked and rule out stupid mistakes. So you need to find some balance.

When it comes to reading, focus on the subjects you don't know as much, and on scenarios which those references might be used for - for example, the emergency response handbook. What would you do if xxxx [insert emergency] happened?

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As I recall, maybe 60% of the exam was quantitative, and 40% qualitative. Or at least, that's how it seemed!

I think the only way to prepare for the qualitative questions is to just read as much as you can. But your only chance of passing rests with how well you can do on the quantitative questions, so you need to be practicing those as much as you can so you can get fast at finding what's asked and rule out stupid mistakes. So you need to find some balance.

When it comes to reading, focus on the subjects you don't know as much, and on scenarios which those references might be used for - for example, the emergency response handbook. What would you do if xxxx [insert emergency] happened?

That breakdown sounds about right for the October exam. I also had the NC State DVDs, and found that they pushed me over the top (3rd time was a charm for me). I agree with Dleg on the looking stuff up part...indexes are helpful, but it really does help to be somewhat familiar with your references. However, I put a couple references in my cart for the exam that I had not looked through at all, that helped me get 2 or 3 questions. After listening to the DVDs on the drive, I would recommend spending the time you have left doing problems and reading up, then during the week before the exam, actually sit down and WATCH the DVDs.

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I have watched them all and have made notes in the printouts. I am hoping listening in the car will help further implant the information in my brain. I did notice a lack of hydraulics on the review. Is the test light on pure hydraulics and hydrology?

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As I recall, the processes are more the focus. There is some pipe sizing and min. sewer slope stuff, but I wouldn't focus too hard on the hydrolgy part. I spent a lot of time for my first try doing lost of hf calsc and the like. Since you work in hydraulics, I would just suggest a brief runthrough of some problems to keep your mind fresh in that area. Do you have the NCEES sample exam? Good refernce of what to expect on the exam.

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Ok.....I won't worry too much about H&H then. I have the NCEES practice problems and they were ok to deal with. I am trying to catch up on air and safety more than anything else. Thanks for the advice!

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Another thing that might be helpful for qualitative problems is EPA factsheets. They're short and usually contain the pertenant information of various regulations. I'm glad I printed them out and brought them with me. I remember getting at least one right because of it. I wouldn't always focus on the most current rules though. I'm sure some problems are several years old so they may reference older regulations . . .

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Thanks for the tips everybody. I'm taking the Env test for the first time in April '09, and trying to best prioritize my time. The advice is appreciated.

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Thanks for the tips everybody. I'm taking the Env test for the first time in April '09, and trying to best prioritize my time. The advice is appreciated.

Good luck, Bacon! Feel free to ask lots of questions. I passed the 100 question monster in October.

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The envl law handbook is a necessity. I relied on it heavily!

As for the CFR stuff...

I printed off individuals sections as I encountered references to them in my studies. Some were helpful, others were just wordy, but its nice to know where the regs are coming from.

I would print off 40 CFR 123.30 - something specific, not the whole 40 CFR.

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The envl law handbook is a necessity. I relied on it heavily!

I've seen some suggestions to study and/or bring the RCRA or CERCLA orientation manuals.

Anybody found this useful? I already printed the RCRA one, and it's not that bad - takes up a 3/4"-1" binder when printed double sided.

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^I just studied the RCRA and CERCLA orientation manuals. I did not have the Env Law Handbook at the time (I have it now, thoug - pretty useful at work). The Law handbook might cover the material just fine. Really, for me, only the RCRA orientation was particularly useful, in explaining the whole "what's a hazardous waste" thing, and in assisting me in tabbing my CFR manual. But later on, I read through the intro chapters in LaGrega's Haz Waste Mgt., and it covered the process pretty well, too.

If you have the Law handbook and the LaGrega book, you probably do not need the free EPA stuff.

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