Road Guy

Propane Heater "top" apparatus...

11 posts in this topic

anyone have one of these?

I was going to pick one up for my garage for doing some work when its 2 degrees out to warm it up some.  It says outdoor use only but was wondering if I was just using it for the garage application if it would kill me?  I can crack a window or two?

 

I bought one of those "heater buddy" that uses the disposable propane tanks (the smaller kind) and it just doesn't work well enough and burns through the smaller propane tanks..

 

 

 

heater.jpg

 

 

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anyone have one of these?

I was going to pick one up for my garage for doing some work when its 2 degrees out to warm it up some.  It says outdoor use only but was wondering if I was just using it for the garage application if it would kill me?  I can crack a window or two?

 

I bought one of those "heater buddy" that uses the disposable propane tanks (the smaller kind) and it just doesn't work well enough and burns through the smaller propane tanks..

 

 

 

heater.jpg

 

 

I got a 360 degree round one. 4 people can stand around at one time. I really like it. Got it at Home Depot for maybe $100.00.

a8c565b15220b5d98cf64f37f9950e25.jpg

I also have used it to heat up garage for a party. Just don't leave on all day??

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32cab2821b55b0b64f6961cca889b775.jpg

40,000 BTU

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The main combustion products formed when gas burns are:
  • Carbon dioxide (CO2), a non-toxic gas formed during complete combustion of carbon based fuels.
  • Carbon monoxide (CO), a toxic gas formed if combustion is incomplete.
  • Nitrogen dioxide, a toxic gas.
  • Water vapor.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Unvented Gas Space Heating ...

 

 

As a spanking new fpe, i would go with 2 window cross flow.

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Quote

 

Additionally, in an enclosed environment , combustion would reduce the available oxygen in the room eventually resulting in hypoxia.

 Hypoxia is a state of oxygen deficiency in the blood, tissues, and cells sufficient to cause an impairment of body functions. Anything that impedes the arrival or utilization of oxygen to the cell places the body in a hypoxic state. All cells require oxygen to function. The central nervous system (made up of the brain and spinal cord) demands a great deal of oxygen (approximately 20 percent of all oxygen that you inhale feeds the brain). If the oxygen supply to the body is reduced, the brain will be one of the first organs to be affected, with the higher reasoning portions of the brain showing degraded function first. This means that judgment and cognitive skills diminish from the very start. There are many conditions that can interrupt the normal flow of oxygen to the cells.

If you are fortunate, you will feel giddy from the lack of oxygen to your brain.  If you miss the symtoms, you may just pass out.

  1. Signs of hypoxia can be detected in an individual by an observer. Signs aren’t a very effective tool for hypoxic individuals to use to recognize hypoxia in themselves. Symptoms of hypoxia are the sensations a person can detect while in a hypoxic state. Personal symptoms of hypoxia are as individual as the person experiencing them. A group of people who are hypoxic will, a majority of the time, get the same symptoms. However, the symptoms will appear in a different order and in varying intensities. The greatest benefit in hypoxia training in an altitude chamber is that the order and the intensity of your symptoms will usually remain constant over the years. Therefore, familiarity with one’s own hypoxia “signature” will facilitate the recognition of a hypoxic state during flight.
  1. Signs
Symptoms
Rapid Breathing Air Hunger
Cyanosis (bluing effect of the skin) Fatigue
Poor Coordination Nausea
Lethargy Headache
Executing Poor Judgement Dizziness
Sweating Tingling
Trembling Visual Impairment
Myoclonic (Muscle) Spasms Euphoria

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4fdd56f2aa8b69b84660a587d43a4487.jpg

I have a couple of these new carbon monoxide detectors left over from a large project. If you want one for your garage I will send you one. But watch out for the tricky verbiage on the box.

"And/or" this is only a carbon monoxide detector. It has no smoke capability.

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I have the lil buddy heater and have it hooked up to a 5 gal propane tank via an adapter hose.  It's not enough to really heat my garage either.  I don't think the one you propose at the beginning will be much better.  The one @Ship Wreck PE posted might be though.

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I saw at Cabelas they also make a larger version of the "lil-buddy"  But at lunch I just bought a kerosene heater from Home Depot, for just under $150 I have something I can use inside or in the garage that wont kill me...

Now that I have the tv mounted on the wall I just need an old laz y boy recliner and I can "work" in the garage like a champ!

 

Where did you get your adapter at for the 5 gallon tank?  I was wondering if I could do that so I didn't always run out of fuel about the time it got hot?  I used to have access to a store called Northern Hardware that sold them back in the ATL, but no such luck here!  I still like the "lil" buddy and plan on taking it on some of our "spring /Colorado Spring" camping trips

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Aren't the kerosene heaters even worse in terms of carbon monoxide?  Just curious what type you picked up.  Our mech. eng. profs almost killed our entire senior class with those jet engine-looking kerosene space heaters back during our senior project, heating a warehouse space where about 60 of us were working.  Even with several doors open.  Three people passed out and the rest of us were complaining about headaches and nausea before they figured it out.

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the new ones are pretty good, we had one back home and it worked pretty nice, Il get  a photo of it and send

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In simple terms of noxious fuel emissions (NOx and SOx), propane is much better than kerosene, diesel, or gasoline.  I got my adapter at home depot.

 

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Cuisinart-Tank-Conversion-Hose-QG-012B/202538406

 

Edited by Audi driver, P.E.

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