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zbest1966

Level of math of the PE

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zbest1966    0

:mf_followthroughfart:I have been out of school for awhile need to refresh my math skill. Whats the expected level of math skills for the PE

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RIP - VTEnviro    527

Some of that will be dependent on which exam you take...

Definitely be sharp on your algebra, geomertry, and trig.

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snickerd3    1,987

you are only allowed a scientific calculator, so if it is more difficult than that you are pretty safe it is not test worthy.

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z06dustin    0

I think the math required to do this problems is all you should worry about, not specific math equations. If you can do your practice problems; you can do the math req'd to pass the PE.

YMMV.

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z06dustin    0
Off topic for a sec - likin' the avatar dustin! Gotta love engineering humor....

haha I'm here for your entertainment!

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wilheldp_PE    548

If you don't understand dustin's avatar, then you are going to have trouble on the electrical exam.

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benbo    39
Dont EE's use j instead of i?

In general I'd say you are correct, but we can use both, depending on what the subject is. Generally, if you are in a subject area (like power) where you are likely to see i used a lot for current, you will use j for the imaginary number. But if you are doing work in other areas, it may not be as important. There can also be confusion because J can mean current density, although I think they generlly use capital J for that.

So it depends on the context to figure out what it means.

But I guess you are correct, in which case dustin's avatar would mean "old school-" or "not current".

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z06dustin    0
Dont EE's use j instead of i?

In general I'd say you are correct, but we can use both, depending on what the subject is. Generally, if you are in a subject area (like power) where you are likely to see i used a lot for current, you will use j for the imaginary number. But if you are doing work in other areas, it may not be as important. There can also be confusion because J can mean current density, although I think they generlly use capital J for that.

So it depends on the context to figure out what it means.

But I guess you are correct, in which case dustin's avatar would mean "old school-" or "not current".

I'm reavealing my nerdyness here... but I've used that on other boards, and only EEs would get it if I used j. This way we all can share in the fun. :multiplespotting:

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SSmith    0
If you don't understand dustin's avatar, then you are going to have trouble on the electrical exam.

But if a null set contains i, then how is it a null set? ;)

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