youngmotivatedengineer

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About youngmotivatedengineer

  • Rank
    Project Manager

Previous Fields

  • Engineering Field
    Civil Engineering
  • License
    EIT
  • Calculator
    TI
  • Discipline

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    New Jersey

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  1. You should list that you passed the test and how long before you can become an actual PE. The same theory applies to people who have their EIT.
  2. Do they decide on cut score based on how well people did? Meaning the better the group did the higher cut score so that there is a certain percentage that gets the license?
  3. I agree that most states treat a PE as a PE regardless of what test you take. Afterall, most approve you to take the test before you can even register. Future states could be a big issue though. It would suck if you move to a state that requires you to pass a specific test and then you have to take the test all over again in the second discipline.
  4. For those that get a free retake, I would suggest doing it. This time around, you know what areas you struggled with so you can pay more attention in those areas and/or ask more questions about those specific topics. Make sure you still pay attention to the other areas though, the October test will be different questions, so it may cover a specific concept that you may not be so strong in.
  5. Keep in mind that these companies do not know the actual exam questions and can only go based on the specifications and past experience or comments from past students. Come October, you may find that topics they focused on in class, but seemed missing from the test may actually be on the October test. For all we know, on the next test structural can be a cake walk while another area could be extremely hard.
  6. Thank you for the clarification. I thought this was what they meant but I could not find something clearly defining what they meant.
  7. II would agree in combing references to 1 binder. I went in with many smaller binders and it turned out taking more time switching between binders. I found that there was not too many problems that required multiple resources to solve the problem that would require me to have 2 references open side by side. If there are general equations, tables, and/or charts they can go in a seperate smaller binder. Another thing to keep in mind is weather. I used a milk crate and it was raining when I got to the site. Luckily I had 1 of my daughters blankets in the car to cover the crate, otherwise it could have been a disaster with everything getting wet. Also don't be afraid to bring a cart to help with the books. I saw people with 2 large luggage cases as well as someone who brought a full-sized hand truck with him.
  8. In chapter 6 of the MUTCD, there are 2 formulas for calculating taper length. One of the formulas mention offset distance. What exactly is the offset distance? Going through the manual and online I couldn't find a clear definition if what this distance is.
  9. Since we are starting to rested now, I suggest starting with a review of all the code references and flagging what may seem important ( tables, figures etc). I had most of the codes with me ( didn't have Osha(several other guides I had included OSHA topics ) or the SP-4 guidelines, but I don't think I really used them codes much during the exam). There may have been some easier questions if I was more familiar with what was in these codes and being able to find the info quickly.
  10. Taken from one of my kids favorite movie, there is only 1 thing we can do...just keep swimming, just keep swimming.
  11. 48/80
  12. Failed :-(
  13. Haven't had the guts to open it yet
  14. I don't think the firm would get in trouble, but the county most likely would not accept plans from an engineer not licensed in that state. If you tried doing a false signature saying you are a PE Illinois, or publicly advertised for work in the state then you would have an issue. Depending on time frame, you can follow Julie's advice and try to get licensed in the state (may not be worth it if there won't be future jobs in the state) or you can try to find a local engineer willing to review and sign off on the plans for you. Your firm can do the work but they would be engineer of record and be the responsible party. The issue you run into with this is making sure the local engineer doesn't charge you more than the profit you would be making.
  15. If the state has to approve them, it will probably come at the end of the day. In NJ the board meetings are an all day event. There was a meeting scheduled for last Thursday but there are no minutes posted so I'm assuming it was pushed off 1 week so that they can review/approve the board results this Thursday.